BWCA Low-carb backcountry meals Boundary Waters BWCA Food and Recipes
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04/30/2015 12:51PM  
I'm trying to drastically reduce the amount of carbs in my diet, so I'm avoiding breads, pastas, and sugar (some sugar in a recipe okay...but avoiding desserts). I'm not hard-core about it, but... Also, while some potatoes are okay in a recipe, I am not eating them as a focal point item, if that makes sense (stew with potatoes=okay. Giant pile of hashbrowns=not okay)

My husband is also on a low carb diabetic diet.

I prefer freezer bag cooking when canoe camping, so I like things fast. (I prefer to do the food prep at home when out there, rather than while in camp)

What are your favorite lower carb menu items?

Will I be stuck having to take a lot of fresh foods that require more cooking time? Not to mention more space...

Anyone ever bring lettuce to the BW? Hubby eats a lot of salads these days...he'll put just about anything on a salad, but I can't see lettuce keeping well up there.
 
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04/30/2015 02:54PM  
We take salad for at least two nights. We usually take along the bagged kits that contain dressing and all. It lasts well for two days, especially if it's cool. Not sure how well it would last if it's 80 degrees, though. One of our favorites is Taylor Farms Asian Chopped salad available at Sam's, and Target. It is mostly Savoy and green cabbage and will last at least two days in 60-70 degree weather.

It was difficult to take before we purchased a food barrel, though. Salad is easy to mash in a soft food pack. Once mashed it doesn't last more than a few hours before becoming totally soggy.

We also take fresh green beans along. They'll last a week at least! Don't wash or prep them at home, leave them whole. Snap the stem end off, wrap loosely in foil with a couple tablespoons of water and toss them into the coals for about 15 minutes to steam. Season them how ever you like. We really like them with a sprinkle of Sour Cream and Onion popcorn seasoning.
 
billconner
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04/30/2015 08:39PM  
I take a vacation from my constant not eating when canoeing and camping. My " hunger is your friend" diet has cut over 30 pounds and able to maintain it. Hopefully another 20 and I'll be set for life.
 
04/30/2015 08:40PM  
Freezer bag fan here too, who also tries to cut out the carbs. I haven't found a good way to do it, so I've settled on just staying away from the wheat and rice. I figure that I'm burning enough calories that I'll just "process" everything. Beans, corn, peppers, vegatables of any type really with protein. I'll normally stay away from beans and corn at home too. I'll eat dried fruit too, that I'd normally not eat at home.
 
04/30/2015 11:15PM  
You might want to consider substituting/using some quinoa and lentils in your freezer bag cooking. Both are high in fiber and protein and low on the glycemic index, so they are filling. Not too many foods have a lower GI than lentils. Add some fat to it and even better. Nuts are good, no sugar added PB. Dark chocolate (85%) for a treat is fairly low in sugar. For a salad you might consider some cabbage, which is tough enough to travel well.
 
Hamm0cker
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04/30/2015 11:27PM  
I believe carbs are relevant in the BWCA. This ain't the suburbs any more. Just choose better sources of carbs like tabouli salad. It screams "freezer bag" simplicity, but is parboiled bulgur wheat. High in bran. Cleans you up real good. Yummy. Requires exactly boiled water.....
 
OBX2Kayak
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05/01/2015 07:32PM  
quote boonie: "You might want to consider substituting/using some quinoa and lentils in your freezer bag cooking. Both are high in fiber and protein and low on the glycemic index, so they are filling. Not too many foods have a lower GI than lentils. Add some fat to it and even better. Nuts are good, no sugar added PB. Dark chocolate (85%) for a treat is fairly low in sugar. For a salad you might consider some cabbage, which is tough enough to travel well."


Laurie Ann March, author of A Fork in the Trail offers lots of good quinoa and lentil recipes. Her book is worth the price; her web site ... priceless.
 
Swampturtle
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05/07/2015 11:41AM  
quote OBX2Kayak: "
quote boonie: "You might want to consider substituting/using some quinoa and lentils in your freezer bag cooking. Both are high in fiber and protein and low on the glycemic index, so they are filling. Not too many foods have a lower GI than lentils. Add some fat to it and even better. Nuts are good, no sugar added PB. Dark chocolate (85%) for a treat is fairly low in sugar. For a salad you might consider some cabbage, which is tough enough to travel well."



Laurie Ann March, author of A Fork in the Trail offers lots of good quinoa and lentil recipes. Her book is worth the price; her web site ... priceless."


+1
I have found excellent recipes, techniques and advice in her first book. Didn't know she had a second called Another Fork In The Trail which is vegan, vegetarian & gluten free recipes. Website says a third book Is on the way. Her blog website is here:
Wilderness cooking
 
05/07/2015 01:30PM  
Why skimp on carbs in the backcountry? That's one case where I can feel confident I'm burning off anything I consume so I don't need to worry about it. If you spend most of your time basecamping I guess it would be understandable.
 
05/07/2015 07:52PM  
The diabetic part of the OP is the reason to avoid simple carbs like pasta and rice. I'm going to experiment over the next few days with some paleo recipes and see what they're like after they're dehydrated.
 
QuietWaters
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05/07/2015 09:37PM  
I plan on bringing lettuce on our trip this summer. We use red romaine at home which seems to stay fresh longer, so we're going to try it. I'll put it in our small soft sided cooler with a few frozen items and see how well it keeps. Hopefully it won't be 90 degrees when we're there.
 
05/08/2015 08:40AM  
I assume from your OP that the glycemic index of the food would be important for your husband and of interest to you. This link might be useful.
 
05/08/2015 09:55PM  
I use this site for almost all things nutrition. I will admit that it's become a bit less user friendly with all the restaurant and prepared foods included in the basic searches.

Nutrition Data

 
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