BWCA Bead and cove end to edge question Boundary Waters Group Forum: Boat Builders and Repair
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      Bead and cove end to edge question     

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Cloznuff
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
 
12/10/2015 06:03AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
For those that have used b&c strips, how do you handle the detail where the flat cut end of a strip meets the bead or cove edge? I'm trying to lay out a pattern for the bottom of a new merlin and am wondering how to address this.

Thanks
 
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1JimD
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12/10/2015 08:17AM  
I'll take a stab,
I'm guessing you are not making a center line cut down the middle of your hull ? Like Canoecraft does.
I've not done this with bead and cove, but you could sand a bead on the flat end of you strip, so that it fit into the cove. You would want to allow a little extra for this joint, as the bead will sit in the cove. In theory an extra 1/8".

A simple hand block sander, would work very well with some 80grit paper.

Could you post a pic ?

Jim
 
Cloznuff
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
 
12/10/2015 09:01AM  
Thanks 1JimD. I thought about adding the bead to the mating end, just wondering how most tackle this. Here's a random internet pic that shows what I'm talking about. You are correct in that I plan on running 1 strip on each side of the centerline and filling in like in the pic. So I will have to plan on having the cove exposed on the 2 outside pieces because it would be hard to add a cove to the strip ends. I just read what I wrote and I hardly understand it myself, hopefully, I make sense to someone else!

 
Alan Gage
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12/10/2015 10:08AM  
If I think about it ahead of time, which I never do, I'll plan ahead and install a strip with a square edge that the trimmed pieces can butt into. But since I rarely have that much forethought I instead use a plane and razor blade to shave off the bead or cove, depending on the situation, of the strip that's already in place, which gives you a square edge for the trimmed pieces to butt into.

Since you're already taking extra time to cut those tapers on the end it doesn't really take any extra to bevel it so that the square edges mate up nicely.

Alan
 
1JimD
distinguished member(541)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/10/2015 06:50PM  
Cloznuf
Your pic explains perfectly.
If this is where you are at, I would take two strips, that are already beaded and coved. Cut the coves off on a table saw.
You will have two strips that just have the bead on them
Glue one strip on each side of the strips that run parallel to the keel strips.
This will give you a square edge that you can fit your angled strips to.

I Hope that makes sense !

That's exactly what Alan is talking about.

Jim
 
1JimD
distinguished member(541)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/10/2015 07:02PM  
I have built a few Merlins, and I know Bruce originally built them with a Herringbone pattern. That worked great, especially if you didn't bead and cove. It also helped use up short strips.
I built all mine with bead and cove, and used the Canoecraft method. It's much easier, and faster.
But every builder does it his way.

Good luck, and post some pics ! I love pics ! HA !

Jim

 
Rustycards
distinguished member (138)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/14/2015 07:36PM  
When I built mine I got to the "football" point when it was time to start from the center and work out to finish the bottom. I then ran 4 chalk lines in a diamond shape and cut the diamond out with my pull saw. I then had a diamond shape in the bottom without bead and cove but rather flat edges to work with. This also gave me a symmetrical shape to work with. Have to credit Dennis from Northwestcanoe.com for this tip. Sorry, don't have a pix to share.
 
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