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05/09/2016 09:13PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I am hoping to do my solo cooking like this: Heat water and pour into a baggie of food that I've prepared at home (freezer bag cooking/FBC). I will either use a little twig-burning stove or a whisperlight (if there is a fire ban).

Which pot do you think I should take? These are my four choices:

Left to right:
1. light weight teapot thing
2. measuring cup that holds probably 1.5 cups totally full (the first line down says 1 1/3 cups)
3. small pot with lid that could be another pot
4. tall, skinny pot I bought today; forgot how much it holds exactly but I like that it has measuring guides inside.

Here's what I'm thinking about each:
1. Pretty big for one person. Also no indication of measuring, which would be helpful for FBC. Like the pour spout, however.
2. Too small and no lid. But I also like that it's small. Like the measuring lines. Nice handle...if it doesn't just get way hot.
3. Decent size. Smaller pot is a lid. But the lid doesn't have a handle. No pour spout, and the wider pot makes this more problematic.
4. Holds enough for 1 FBC meal plus a hot drink at the same time. Has measuring guides. Nice vented lid with tab to pull lid off with. Comes with two cups that nestle inside; but these are extremely heavy thick plastic things that I will never use. Bugs me to buy something and then never use it, but I really liked the pot and overall think it's better than my other three options that I already own.

Which would you take?


 
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05/09/2016 09:58PM  
Door number 4. I looked long and hard at that item on my last shopping trip, not yet. I would take a cup, heat your water, pour off enough for a hot beverage and make the meal in the balance.
Nice to keep it simple. I could work on that.
 
05/09/2016 10:10PM  
Door #4 as well.
Here is what I use. The bowl and coffee cup fit right inside it. I have an attachment that allows me to cook on top of my jetboil. When space for food allows, it all fits into my bearvault. The cooking utinsels not the jetboil.

Brand is GSI outdoors. Bought the coffee cup separately.

 
05/09/2016 10:13PM  
At the mention of a cup, I ran out to the garage to see if my titanium mug fits inside pot #4.

YESSSSSS

Then I weighed it, plus the foldable twig stove: 1 lb 5 oz.

I really hope there isn't a fire ban by the time I am going. My stove, pot, cup AND fuel weigh 1 lb 5 oz? Score! (technically the fuel weighs more. But I won't be carrying fuel...)
 
Guyinaboat
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05/09/2016 10:14PM  
It really depends on how much room you have but I would take one of the smaller units. It's always nice to have a lid to protect food from bugs. I would go with #3 or #4. Probably #4 since it seems less bulky.
 
05/09/2016 11:06PM  
Small pot with bail handle and pan lid (are you sure it does not have a folding handle?), looks like a 1 quart Peak One pot. Primarily because it would match the flame pattern of the stove I like. There you have pot and pan/plate, only a good cup and cutlery to fill out a cookset.


You can bake in it well also.

butthead
 
05/09/2016 11:22PM  
quote butthead: "Small pot with bail handle and pan lid (are you sure it does not have a folding handle?), looks like a 1 quart Peak One pot. Primarily because it would match the flame pattern of the stove I like. There you have pot and pan/plate, only a good cup and cutlery to fill out a cookset.
You can bake in it well also.


butthead"


Now that you mention it, I think it does. Couldn't remember and didn't see it in the pic.

I've just created my meal plan. I am not going to cook other than make hard boiled eggs and freezer bag cooking meals. I cook enough at home. No dishes to wash, either (just going to lick my utensils until they're clean!). Only drawback to not washing dishes is the need to more thoroughly wash hands. :)

I have to do the boiled eggs. I have my own chickens and it would be a shame not to take advantage of saving up some unwashed eggs to take along unrefrigerated.

I bought the #3 pan from kanoes (It's part of a larger set)
 
05/09/2016 11:29PM  
Nola, what stove are you taking?

butthead
 
05/09/2016 11:30PM  
quote butthead: "Nola, what stove are you taking?


butthead"


Either a whisperlight (I think that's the name) or a foldable stove I can burn twigs in (Canoe42 used this and raved about it).

Depends on if there's a fire ban or not.

link to stove

I also plan to test the twig thing before going for it to see what I think. But Dave likes it.
 
05/09/2016 11:40PM  
I you go Whisperlite, a wider pot 5 plus inches diameter works better. The sterno stove will do a smaller pot ok, might be slow and difficult to boil eggs though.

butthead
 
05/10/2016 12:02AM  
quote butthead: "I you go Whisperlite, a wider pot 5 plus inches diameter works better. The sterno stove will do a smaller pot ok, might be slow and difficult to boil eggs though.


butthead"


I'll bring that pot along, too, then and use it with the whisperlite if I have to take it in.

For the eggs I just need to get the water boiling and then let it sit for 15 minutes. Just two at one time is all I need. Dave says it boils water pretty quickly; I'll test it soon myself.
 
05/10/2016 06:07AM  
Nojo-

I think #4 would be your best choice of the ones listed.

I went to the system of rehydrating and eating meals out of the bag several years ago. Shortly after that I upgraded from a small Coleman canister stove to a JetBoil Sol, which is a compact, lightweight, and efficient integrated system. I have been very happy with both of those. I have no experience with a twig burner.

You'll want a "cozy" to keep your meal warm while it rehydrates. You may need a "pot holder" glove if the pot handle gets hot. Hand sanitizer is your friend ;).


 
Alan Gage
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05/10/2016 08:16AM  
I always thought cooking in the bag seemed wasteful since you end up with a dirty (and soon to be stinky) bag every meal. I prefer to carry bulk ingredients in their own bags (farro, quinoa, beans, veggies, hash browns, etc...). I measure out by the handful (2 handfuls of beans, 2 of veggies, and 2 of grains is a dinner), dump it into the pot, add water by eye (add more if it gets too dry or call it stew if too much water), bring to a hard boil, pull pot off the stove and wrap in DIY cozies (super cheap and easy), let sit for 10-15 minutes, and eat.

Cleaning the pot is super easy because nothing gets baked on unless you let it dry out while cooking. Just a quick rinse of water will do.

Alan
 
05/10/2016 08:41AM  
quote Alan Gage: "I always thought cooking in the bag seemed wasteful since you end up with a dirty (and soon to be stinky) bag every meal. I prefer to carry bulk ingredients in their own bags (farro, quinoa, beans, veggies, hash browns, etc...). I measure out by the handful (2 handfuls of beans, 2 of veggies, and 2 of grains is a dinner), dump it into the pot, add water by eye (add more if it gets too dry or call it stew if too much water), bring to a hard boil, pull pot off the stove and wrap in DIY cozies (super cheap and easy), let sit for 10-15 minutes, and eat.


Cleaning the pot is super easy because nothing gets baked on unless you let it dry out while cooking. Just a quick rinse of water will do.


Alan"


That describes the method I like. Apparently not real popular here. I have used and rejected the individually wrapped meals, and go with bags, ziplock/twist-tie baggies of ingredients (what I describe as pantry method). But a GSI solo press serves as cozie, the press itself has the benefit of a good strainer, or cup in the pot together for extra long cooking periods (together they hold temp for a good 30 minutes). I do like fresh breads so baking is a part of my cooking.
15 bags holding all food and snacking for a 10 day trip. Meats include beef/pork/bacon, starchy items pasta/potatoes, veggies are tomatoes/mushrooms/onions/peas/corn/peppers, soups, Bisquick baking mix, dried dairy items, coffee, nuts, dried fruit, chocolates, bottle maple syrup, bottle of oil, 2 bottles Mio and container of butter.

butthead
 
05/10/2016 09:24AM  
I'm too nervous to do it the way butthead and Alan are doing it. I know that might not make sense, but I need to see each meal separately so that I know I'm going to have enough. Maybe when I get more experience solo tripping I can switch. I justify the wasted ziplock bags because I am very frugal with them in my normal life. Prefer reusable if at all possible, unless I'm away from home.
 
05/10/2016 09:28AM  
quote Alan Gage: "I always thought cooking in the bag seemed wasteful since you end up with a dirty (and soon to be stinky) bag every meal. "

The bag only stinks if you don't zip it back up after you're done. Well, I'm sure it still will stink...just don't open it back up after it's sat a few days!
 
Alan Gage
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05/10/2016 09:35AM  
quote nojobro: "I'm too nervous to do it the way butthead and Alan are doing it. I know that might not make sense, but I need to see each meal separately so that I know I'm going to have enough.

I felt the same way for a long time and while I was still doing shorter trips I'd just over pack to be sure I had enough food. But last year I planned a 30-40 day trip and bringing twice as much food as I might need wasn't an option.

The easy way to do it was to eat a few meals at home before the trip and weigh all the ingredients. You quickly figure out the proportions of protein/veggie/grains and also how much total you need. For me it came out to about 2oz. of each plus 1/2-3/4oz oil for a good sized dinner meal.

Now it's easy to know how much of each ingredient to bring. If I plan to have veggies for every dinner I just multiply 2 ounces times the number of meals and weigh out the needed amount of veggies. Same for the rest of the ingredients.

And while you're at it figure out how many ounces a handful is. For me it turns out one handful is about 1 ounce of dried food. Doesn't seem to matter if it's veggies, grains, or beans. Now that I know one handful is 1 ounce and that I need 2 ounces each of beans, grains, and veggies I can easily measure out my meals at camp.

I do the same for bannock mix, powdered eggs, and dried potatoes. It's a nice system and allows you to mix and match ingredients depending on mood or hunger level.

Alan

 
05/10/2016 09:52AM  
Some very useful information here, thanks.
As long as I have the space and since I like a few luxuries I take a set including skillet, fry bake pan, and small coffee pot. I eat out of the skillet and bake breads in the pan. I also lick clean to reduce introducing food to the environment. Wiping up with a piece of bread works well.
I have started building a backpacking system and the JetBoil type systems make a lot of sense.
 
05/10/2016 12:00PM  
butthead and alan...so what types of dishes are you cooking with your ingredients?
 
Alan Gage
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05/10/2016 12:03PM  
quote nojobro: "butthead and alan...so what types of dishes are you cooking with your ingredients?"

Not many variations for me. I don't mind repetition and keeping it the same every day made it much easier to plan for a long trip. At first I was going to try and vary my meals more but then I realized that at home I usually eat the same things day after day so why not when tripping too?

Most breakfasts are powdered eggs and hashbrowns. I also bring along some oatmeal and on special days pancakes. For the pancakes I just add a little powdered egg and oil to the bannock mix and make it runnier with more water. Some mornings I'd just have some nuts and raisins if I didn't feel that hungry. This year I think I'll be swapping out the hashbrowns for mashed (less volume). I'll also be having oatmeal more often.

Lunch is bannock and peanut butter. Some people cook big batches of bannock to last a few days but I prefer to cook it fresh and hot each time. I usually paddle late into the day so I usually stop for a full hour at lunch to cook and relax. It's probably my favorite part of the day. Some mornings I'd cook the bannock with cinnamon and raisins to eat for breakfast. I'll also have it with dinner some nights. But on days when I didn't feel very hungry at lunch or when the weather was bad I'd just snack on some raisins, peanut M&Ms and almonds. Even my trail mix I keep separated so that I can eat whatever I feel like at the time.

Dinner is almost always a mix of beans, veggies, and grains. Last year I carried black, red, and garbanzo beans. Veggies were peas, corn, carrots and green beans. Grains were farro and quinoa. I throw it all in the pan and cook it together but you could also do them separately if you preferred it that way.

I also brought along some really good vegetarian chili and homemade tomato sauce to put in it. Enough for about 6 meals to have on special occasions or days when I felt I needed a little morale boost.

If I eat dinner with bannock I might leave out some or all of the grains. Or if you were eating fish you caught you could leave out the meat/beans and just cook up the grains and veggies. If I didn't work very hard that day or if I snacked a lot I can easily add less of any or all ingredients. Or more if I worked extra hard or skipped lunch.

I don't think I'll be bringing any garbanzo beans this time. I like them a lot but didn't care for them as much in my one pot meals. They also seemed more difficult to rehydrate. I love bread and will probably take more bannock this year. I took about 10 pounds last year and had to ration myself towards the end.

I think the shorter the trip duration the less particular you need to be about quantities. At the beginning of a trip it seems like your body is happy to get a good amount of fuel by burning what you already have stored in your body. For nearly two weeks into my long trip last summer I was surprised by my lack of hunger and regularly skipped a meal most days. During the last 2-3 weeks I ate full portions every meal and was always hungry at meal time. I lost 5.5 pounds during the 30 days I was out (from 171 to 165.5).

Alan
 
OldFingers57
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05/10/2016 01:35PM  
I use a small REI Ti ware pot and then use my Snowpeak Gigapower stove or an Alky stove with a DIY caldera cone. I do the Freezer bag cooking so not much mess other than the bag. Plus I use a long handled Ti spoon to eat with. A small insulated coffee mug and a cozy to put the FBC bag into.
 
05/10/2016 01:51PM  
Favorites are beef stroganoff, spaghetti, beef/pork stew with potatoes, biscuits with sausage gravy, potato pancakes with fish if caught or bacon/sausage.
Mac and cheese, soups, pancakes fill extra.
Main meals can be configured from 3 meats, 3 starch, variety of veggies most mixed. Lunches from Bisquick mixed something, potato pancakes, soups. Snacks whenever desired.

butthead
 
muddyfeet
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05/10/2016 10:24PM  
#4 for sure, but make sure you have a windscreen for it. Can be just a piece of aluminum roof flashing from the hardware store. It will roll around or Inside the pot for stowage, but will Make a huge difference in cooking times and fuel usage. Mine sits on the ground and protects the stove and the bottom 1/3 of the pot. This setup worked well for FBC meals and hot drinks.
 
05/11/2016 09:26AM  
So yesterday I tried out the twig stove. In the rain. I figured that's a good test (though I had totally try twigs and pine needles). 16 oz boiled in less than 10 minutes (I was timing it but then not paying much attention to the pot...it could have been less). I started timing at the very start before the fire was even going well.

Notes on the twig stove:

One must basically constantly feed it. But this is, in a weird way, kind of fun. Must have pile of sticks and tinder immediately at hand before starting.

I was surprised how quickly the water was heating.

I would like to have some gloves to wear while snapping twigs to avoid getting dirty and full of sap. So add gloves to the weight of my stove package (though would have been nice anyway, for gathering firewood for a campfire).

Ditto gloves for unfolding the stove after I'm done heating water.

This stove might be a bit of a pain overall (gas is easier), but I don't like the whisperlite stove at all, frankly, and that's the stove I've got...don't want to spend $$ on a Jetboil or something right now. (I despise how the whisperlite flares up when cold...freaks me the heck out every single time)
 
05/11/2016 12:50PM  
I've only been taking an emberlit twig stove on all my trips lately. A good hot fire in the stove will get water going for oatmeal and coffee in well under 10 minutes. I just keep it stoked and make sure the lid on my pot is tight.


Headed to Pictured Rocks at the end of the month to hike with my son and other than a beef stroganoff meal he requested as a birthday meal, we're going to try butthead's pantry method.
 
05/11/2016 01:13PM  
quote LindenTree3: "Door #4 as well.
Here is what I use. The bowl and coffee cup fit right inside it. I have an attachment that allows me to cook on top of my jetboil. When space for food allows, it all fits into my bearvault. The cooking utinsels not the jetboil.


Brand is GSI outdoors. Bought the coffee cup separately.


"


This is what I use also, But from your options number 4
 
mastertangler
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05/11/2016 03:21PM  
About the twig stove.........I picked up a solo stove which looks like the cats meow as far as twig stoves go.......I experimented a bit and found results pretty darn tooting good but I didn't like the soot aspect of the entire deal. Soot is dirty and tends to get on everything eventually and it dissuaded me from going that route.
 
05/11/2016 03:50PM  
quote mastertangler: " About the twig stove.........I picked up a solo stove which looks like the cats meow as far as twig stoves go.......I experimented a bit and found results pretty darn tooting good but I didn't like the soot aspect of the entire deal. Soot is dirty and tends to get on everything eventually and it dissuaded me from going that route."

I'm going to handle it with gloves on and put it in an old stuff sack for storage. I hear ya on the soot...hoping these measures help.

I don't really care if the pot turns black on the outside.
 
05/11/2016 04:02PM  
I carry a couple plastic garbage sacks and put any soot covered cookware in one before going in the stuff sack. I have an old stuff sack I get dirty when I open from all the soot. It was army issue canvas if anyone wants it...
 
05/11/2016 06:57PM  
Nojo-

Before I got the JetBoil, I used an inexpensive ($25) Coleman canister stove I got at WalMart. Do you want to try it?
 
05/12/2016 08:45AM  
quote boonie: "Nojo-


Before I got the JetBoil, I used an inexpensive ($25) Coleman canister stove I got at WalMart. Do you want to try it?"


I'm excited about the twig stove. So no, thanks. :)
 
05/12/2016 09:20AM  
I hope it works out well for you. I have considered them (and wood/alcohol combos), especially for longer trips, so will be interested in your thoughts after the trip.
 
jcavenagh
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05/15/2016 09:09AM  
You will be well served with the choices you have made. A lot of folks really like that Stanley pot. It is sturdy and heats up well. All the best! j
 
1JimD
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05/15/2016 09:06PM  
This is a very good thread !

I'm interested in the Pantry system ! I like not having sticky and eventually moldy bags in my pack from commercial freeze dried meals !
I see a lot of possible variations.
What do you guys take for spices ?
 
FOG51
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05/15/2016 09:23PM  
Beings someone else jumped into the twigs stove I'll tell you what I used last Sept. up in Ontario just south of Wabikimi. I used a 3 pd coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and holes drilled around the edges for draft, large square hole cut in the side to feed the twigs in. Atop of that I used one of those blue and white metal cups [I got it at WallMart], got the stove going and put about 1-1/4 cups of water into the cup along with 1/2 a package of Knoors noodles, bring it to a boil and the simmer till noodles are done, some cheese and crackers and supper. Washed out the cup, put it inside the coffee can along with the spoon and dropped the whole thing into a stuff sack so no soot would get on everything else in the pack. I got the stove idea from Housty9. FRED
 
billconner
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05/16/2016 07:24AM  
quote FOG51: "Beings someone else jumped into the twigs stove I'll tell you what I used last Sept. up in Ontario just south of Wabikimi. I used a 3 pd coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and holes drilled around the edges for draft, large square hole cut in the side to feed the twigs in. Atop of that I used one of those blue and white metal cups [I got it at WallMart], got the stove going and put about 1-1/4 cups of water into the cup along with 1/2 a package of Knoors noodles, bring it to a boil and the simmer till noodles are done, some cheese and crackers and supper. Washed out the cup, put it inside the coffee can along with the spoon and dropped the whole thing into a stuff sack so no soot would get on everything else in the pack. I got the stove idea from Housty9. FRED"

I got the ten tin stove idea from my aunt, a Girl Scout executive, born in 1889, when I was a young Boy Scout, 50+ years ago. Cut the hole in bottom to feed, use a church key to cut holes in the sides just under rim, cook pancakes right on it. Probably fry pan bread too, no fry pan required.
 
05/16/2016 09:28PM  
quote 1JimD: " This is a very good thread !


I'm interested in the Pantry system ! I like not having sticky and eventually moldy bags in my pack from commercial freeze dried meals !
I see a lot of possible variations.
What do you guys take for spices ? "


Pretty simple stuff not much for lots of spice, salt, pepper, dried Italian herb seasons, chives and or green onions.

butthead
 
gkimball
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05/22/2016 10:24AM  
quote FOG51: "Beings someone else jumped into the twigs stove I'll tell you what I used last Sept. up in Ontario just south of Wabikimi. I used a 3 pd coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and holes drilled around the edges for draft, large square hole cut in the side to feed the twigs in. Atop of that I used one of those blue and white metal cups [I got it at WallMart], got the stove going and put about 1-1/4 cups of water into the cup along with 1/2 a package of Knoors noodles, bring it to a boil and the simmer till noodles are done, some cheese and crackers and supper. Washed out the cup, put it inside the coffee can along with the spoon and dropped the whole thing into a stuff sack so no soot would get on everything else in the pack. I got the stove idea from Housty9. FRED"


Last year I switched to a Trangia alcohol stove backed up by a home made coffee can stick stove for soloing. Cook and heat most water on the alcohol stove. The stick stove is a back up and great way to heat a large batch of water if needed and can cook anything and never a problem finding fuel. Someday might try a trip with it as the only stove.

Have had this one for about 5 years:


 
05/22/2016 11:04PM  
quote nojobro: "quote boonie: "Nojo-



Before I got the JetBoil, I used an inexpensive ($25) Coleman canister stove I got at WalMart. Do you want to try it?"



I'm excited about the twig stove. So no, thanks. :)"


I love the idea of the twig stove and the use of available fuel! I am lazy when it comes to building campfires but this would be like a mini campfire every night.

Be sure to keep an eye on the fire bans before your trip to make sure this stove would be OK to bring.
 
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