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      Shining soloing?     
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missmolly
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10/23/2016 08:59AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I think sometimes soloing is elevated to a shiny status it doesn't deserve, as if it's more significant than paddling with others.

Full disclosure: I prefer soloing for the convenience. I don't have to coordinate with others on trip dates. I get to pack exactly the food I prefer. I don't have to wait for a paddling pal to make coffee or extract themselves from the tent to go fishing. I don't have to double back to fetch a partner who was too groggy to rise and shine at 4 a.m.

However, these are all a matter of convenience. Sure, I get the night heeby-jeebies the first few nights, but beyond that, I'm not a whole lot safer in the woods or on the water with a pal than alone and we all do a more dangerous solo activity everyday, which is driving, sharing the road with drunks, methheads, and texters.
 
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Alan Gage
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10/23/2016 10:52AM  
I think to some it's a bigger deal than others, and rightly so. For some people, me included, being solo feels natural. Most of my life is spent doing solo activities and it's been that way since I was a kid. I find it comfortable and natural. That's not the case for most people though so I can see where breaking free and finding out they can do things on their own would be a big deal. Or just relishing the ability to get some "alone time" away from the daily demands of friends, family, and work.

While I often shake my head at the anxiety people feel before their first solo I then step back and realize I'd probably feel that same level of anxiety and have just as many questions if I was planning my first group trip, which I've never done.

Stepping outside your comfort zone is always intimidating and, hopefully, rewarding.

Alan
 
hobbydog
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10/23/2016 12:17PM  
I envy those that have the perfect tripping partner(s). I would love to have some but i am far from a perfect tripping partner, especially if I am tired and crabby. I like to do things my way and I hate waiting on slow pokes. So unless you have the perfect tripping partners, soloing is pretty shiny.

I am at my cabin alone for the next 12 days and then my deer hunting buddies show up. I am savoring every day alone until then.
 
10/23/2016 03:16PM  
Soloing shines brightly for me. I like it. That's just a personal preference. It's not that it's more or less significant - just different. I'm sure it's different for each person.

A big part of it is the convenience you mention, but it goes beyond that to being a different experience - less distracted, more immersive, and more meditative. It offers me something that's nearly non-existent in my life at times. I'm sure it has more luster to me than to those who live alone, work alone, have fewer stressors, and responsibilities.

Like Alan I've always done many things alone since I was young. I've always done many things just for the experience of doing them, more so than the experience of doing them with others as a social activity, which would more accurately describe my brother. He, for example, would never do a solo BW trip.

I'm sure that the amount of luster a solo trip has varies with each person and that there's a pretty broad range.

 
mastertangler
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10/23/2016 04:05PM  
A shiny status it doesn't deserve?

Lots of ways of looking at this. Well, the simple fact of the matter is if you go down there is usually no one readily available to help. That alone adds an edge to soloing which is not a factor with a group.

Personally I think the group trippers, who have never went together before, deserve the real badges of courage ;-)
 
NotSoFast
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10/23/2016 05:17PM  
It definitely gets people's attention when they ask about a trip and I report I went solo. Many can't seem to fathom the idea, perhaps due to misplaced safety concerns. And it is nice indeed to not have to worry about others' agendas for a few days.

Is soloing more difficult? It's more work, since there's no one to share camp chores. There a bit more risk, although experienced wilderness travelers know how to minimize that.

So is a solo trip shinier? Well, it definitely beats traveling with a bad/disorganized group or someone who has a highly focused agenda that's not the same as mine. It's not shinier than a trip with a really good partner.
 
quark2222
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10/23/2016 06:36PM  
Soloing is just something I do and I love to do it. Most people don't "get" all the hard work and wildness of the BWCA/Quetico to be "out there" in the woods with only a tripping partner or solo. When you throw in the "solo" aspect, they just look at it as hard to fathom. They think that a bear or wolf will eat you, or you get lost and never come back. I just look at it as, "what happens, happens". That is what life is all about in the woods. Doesn't mean you have to be stupid or not prepare, but things do happen, and you better have a plan to deal with it. If that plan fails, then, I guess it was meant to be.

Soloing rocks, and that is my preference. Dual solo's is next best. A great canoeing partner in a tandem is third. A big group (for me, at least) would not be a great time. At least one of the group would be a downer, e.g. the "lady" who barfed on the ground in front of her tent one afternoon after having downed most of the other trip-mates liquor stash earlier that day when they weren't looking.

Tomster
 
10/23/2016 07:01PM  
OK, I'm back - my life interrupted my chain of thought (again).

quote missmolly: ". . . I'm not a whole lot safer in the woods or on the water with a pal than alone . . ."

This was really driven home to me recently when I had a heart attack a month after my trip. If it had happened on Roe Lake, I'd have probably been dead before anybody could get there and even if someone had been with me there's probably nothing they could have done that would have saved me.

And there's always the possibility that a partner could get me into a situation I might not have got into myself.
 
10/23/2016 07:06PM  
I have gone solo most of my adult life. It's just easier to organize a trip, schedule the trip, etc.

A friend of mine once commented that I was very comfortable keeping my own company. I'm not a loner by any means and enjoy being around other people, but I don't find being with other people to be a necessity.

The only negative thing that bothers me about solo tripping Is that I love sharing "special moments" with other people and there are always special moments during any wilderness trip. Those moments make special memories and are more special when they're shared.
 
missmolly
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10/23/2016 07:20PM  
quote boonie: "OK, I'm back - my life interrupted my chain of thought (again).


quote missmolly: ". . . I'm not a whole lot safer in the woods or on the water with a pal than alone . . ."


This was really driven home to me recently when I had a heart attack a month after my trip. If it had happened on Roe Lake, I'd have probably been dead before anybody could get there and even if someone had been with me there's probably nothing they could have done that would have saved me.


And there's always the possibility that a partner could get me into a situation I might not have got into myself. "


I thought about you when I wrote that line.

I used the word "shining" poorly. A solo trip is shiny to me because I love the silence (Boonie described it well as "less distracted, more immersive, and more meditative.") and the freedom it delivers. Folks who don't solo give soloing more credence than it deserves. It's just a canoeing trip where you do everything on your own.
 
10/23/2016 07:27PM  
quote awbrown: "
The only negative thing that bothers me about solo tripping Is that I love sharing "special moments" with other people and there are always special moments during any wilderness trip. Those moments make special memories and are more special when they're shared."


I agree. This is where I miss company the most. And also around the fire in the evening. Soloing is definitely not for the majority. We're mostly introverts who don't have to be partying to have a good time. I can't think of one other family member (extended included) who would ever go solo. We are probably in the 1% of people who love to do things in the outdoors.

I'm like the others and have always enjoyed doing things alone. My Mom tells the story of me as a 5 year old outside in a snowstorm just building a fort for hours by myself.


 
Northwoodsman
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10/23/2016 08:03PM  
quote hobbydog: "I envy those that have the perfect tripping partner(s). I would love to have some but i am far from a perfect tripping partner, especially if I am tired and crabby. I like to do things my way and I hate waiting on slow pokes. So unless you have the perfect tripping partners, soloing is pretty shiny.

Well said hobbydog! I don't think that I make a great trip partner either. If I'm tired I can be a real bear. I sort of delegate myself to be the planner and activity director which I am trying not to do. I am open to doing things according to other peoples methods but I can't read minds. If you have a "better" way to do it, then speak up and let's give it a try. I always look forward to learning new things. I am looking forward to my first solo next year. Who knows, maybe it will turn me into a better tripping partner.

 
10/23/2016 08:13PM  
TomT,
Nice story,
I have been solo 80% of my life. I did my first solo around age 11.
I motor boated to an island on the lake my family was vacationing at and spent the nite alone in Northern MN.
I find it hard to feel comfortable with others after being alone for most of my life, and going solo, therefore feels natural.

I do love camping with my wife, she is great, we just only camp together once a year now.
Despite all our difficulties in marriage, we have had just one fight in 20 years of camping together. (And it was my fault)
Can't wait to see her soon after a summer in AK.

Today's pic of the overlook above Skilak Lake where I spend my AK summers.
There are just a handful of people who live on this lake on the Kenai Peninsula.

 
quark2222
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10/23/2016 08:42PM  
quote TomT: "quote awbrown: "
The only negative thing that bothers me about solo tripping Is that I love sharing "special moments" with other people and there are always special moments during any wilderness trip. Those moments make special memories and are more special when they're shared."



I agree. This is where I miss company the most. And also around the fire in the evening. Soloing is definitely not for the majority. We're mostly introverts who don't have to be partying to have a good time. I can't think of one other family member (extended included) who would ever go solo. We are probably in the 1% of people who love to do things in the outdoors.


I'm like the others and have always enjoyed doing things alone. My Mom tells the story of me as a 5 year old outside in a snowstorm just building a fort for hours by myself.



"

I knew I was a 1 per center! Unfortunately not monetarily . . .

Tomster
 
muddyfeet
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10/23/2016 10:57PM  
quote boonie: "
A big part of it is the convenience you mention, but it goes beyond that to being a different experience - less distracted, more immersive, and more meditative. It offers me something that's nearly non-existent in my life at times. I'm sure it has more luster to me than to those who live alone, work alone, have fewer stressors, and responsibilities.

"


This is well said.
 
mastertangler
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10/24/2016 05:48AM  
Occasionally I am "trip leader" when I get 3 other solo boats together.......My philosophy is "let everyone do what they want". If I have to do extra work while someone else fishes or just sits thats fine.

But sometimes........We had been in the backcountry of Georgian Bay.......lots of islands, easy to get turned around. We had been fishing deep in the interior for over 5 hours with no results. I decided to ease towards the big water and try it out there........being the "guide" my buddies were in tow. Eventually they rebelled, lost interest, started falling behind and then completely stopped without telling me. I didn't think they could make it back to camp alone so I had to paddle a good 15 minutes back. I started percolating (getting hot) and found them dilly dallying on an island. I chewed them out rather soundly and then we proceeded to the outside where a muskie was landed and yes devoured quite promptly.

We are all the best of friends and if they could go for longer than 10 days we would still be a force. My point is, if possible, let folks do what they desire without imposing your own will or agenda. If they want to sleep in on a travel day then fine, I have my boat I can fish for a while. Be flexible.

 
10/24/2016 06:58AM  
People do give it more credence than it deserves in several regards, especially the safety aspect. I get the same reaction that many have reported in this thread - that it's just unfathomable. First, they have trouble just comprehending the wilderness part, but solo . . . ?! What if something happens?!

As you pointed out, everyday life is not without its dangers, but they are familiar. People know a lot of it is unlikely, but what we're talking about is totally alien to them. And all the imagined dangers are overblown.

Yeah, I could have a problem out there in the wilderness on a solo, but I could also be driving alone in a rural area with no cell phone service. I do that way more often here than many would believe.

I imagine that women who solo in the wilderness must get even more uncomprehending looks from some! :) I've told some that there are women who solo in the wilderness and they are just flabbergasted - that's unimaginable! They probably wouldn't even take a walk on the rail trail alone, but as you pointed out, that might actually be more dangerous in some respects!



 
missmolly
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10/24/2016 08:43AM  
I like reading your posts, Boonie.

As you likely know, I paddle on Crown Land lakes. I don't encounter many people. Going a week without seeing anyone is typical. However, over two, aggregate years of paddling Crown Land lakes, I have met some other paddlers and about 40% of them are female. Two groups were especially impressive. One consisted of five women in two canoes. They were wondering if there was a portage to another lake and I told them where to find it. I then asked them if they'd reached our current location by Lake X or Lake Y.

"Neither," they said. "We came by Lake Z."

"But there's no portage from Lake Z," I said.

"Yeah, we know. We just took a walk through the woods."

That was a about a mile walk through new growth. It was ten shades of Hell, but they smiled when they said it.

Another time I was fishing below a waterfall when two women appeared. I was wearing Gore-tex, I had a carbon fiber paddle, and was sitting in a Kevlar Bell Rockstar. They were wearing garbage bags with three holes each for heads and arms and were paddling a dented aluminum canoe. I felt like such a wimp.
 
10/24/2016 09:43AM  
quote missmolly: "Another time I was fishing below a waterfall when two women appeared. I was wearing Gore-tex, I had a carbon fiber paddle, and was sitting in a Kevlar Bell Rockstar. They were wearing garbage bags with three holes each for heads and arms and were paddling a dented aluminum canoe. I felt like such a wimp. "

You may be a wimp, but you can console yourself with the thought that they were probably cold, wet, and tired. :).
 
10/25/2016 07:56AM  
"Shining soloing?"

Bull! I solo because I'm selfish and anti-social.

butthead

PS: Sent this from Clarksville TN on my way to FL to spend time with G-Kids and relatives. Disneyworld, Universal, Garlits Museum, lots more, not much alone stuff for the next month. Pitty me! bh
 
missmolly
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10/25/2016 08:39PM  
quote boonie: "quote missmolly: "Another time I was fishing below a waterfall when two women appeared. I was wearing Gore-tex, I had a carbon fiber paddle, and was sitting in a Kevlar Bell Rockstar. They were wearing garbage bags with three holes each for heads and arms and were paddling a dented aluminum canoe. I felt like such a wimp. "


You may be a wimp, but you can console yourself with the thought that they were probably cold, wet, and tired. :). "


True dat. They were also half my age. Easier to get by with a garbage bag when you're still a pup.
 
10/26/2016 02:30AM  
I do think of soloing as a shining experience much for the same reasons that Boonie brought up.

I am a wife, mother, and registered nurse so I spend most of my time taking care of other people's needs before my own.

So when I have the opportunity to head into the woods alone I jump at the chance to be "self centered"...not having to think about anyone else while I am there. While I would definitely say that I am a people oriented person I am just fine with sitting solo lake side and soaking up the solitude.

But I have had great trips with friends and my boys as well!
 
10/28/2016 10:04AM  
I've been walking in the woods by myself since I was a little kid. Living on a farm, it wasn't like I could get together with a bunch of kids and play baseball or something. It's just how I grew up, so it's not that big of a deal.

I was out on a solo hiking trip over memorial day a few years ago and I missed a graduation party. My wife was there without me and told people what I was doing when asked why I wasn't with her. She got all the usual questions, concerns and protests from a group of extended family and friends. Someone asked her "How can you let him do that?". Before she could answer, my mother swooped in to "save her" from the group. My wife recounted it as my mom saying something to the effect of, "He's been going off in the woods by himself since he was 7. If you don't let him do it, you won't be able to stand to be around him. She's letting him do it for her own sanity as much as his." LOL

I take it for granted, but have come to expect people will not understand that it's not that big of a deal. I think more and more people aren't connected to anything wilderness related, so they see it as some sort of extremely dangerous proposition.
 
11/30/2016 02:08AM  
I'm sorry for posting so late, but I tend to agree with the OP. Guys and gals who take solo trips tend to "humble brag" and/or puff up their chests a bit when discussing their solo adventures. A ten-day trip with a buddy? Not much to talk about...but a ten-day solo? That's worth a little extra.

And maybe it's deserved. I take solo trips, and I recognize in others the same tendencies I see in myself. A solo trip *is* different and *does* include extra risk. People on this site accomplish amazing things. And I'm proud of my solo experiences, too. But I do think there's a bit of arrogance in the solo community. Of course, I'm not saying everyone does this, but....a quick look through the trip reports, and even the tenor of posts in different forums, will reveal a different tone (to my ears, at least) than is typically found in the non-solo reports/forums.

Just my .02.
 
MagicPaddler
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11/30/2016 07:18AM  
Hope you get a laugh out of this.
I was stopped at a gas station filling up with my canoe on the roof when a fell at the next pump ask where I used the canoe. I was unshaven and the car was full of unorganized gear. I replied that I was returning from a 14 day solo in Quetico.
He said “Wow you are brave”.
I said “ Ya I am brave” and then paused for ½ second. His face said it all. He had started a conversation he did not want to be in with some nut.
Then I said “I drove through Chicago without a armed guard”.
We both laughed and the conversation continued as we finished filling up.
It all depends on your comfort zone.
 
11/30/2016 08:11AM  
quote carmike: "I'm sorry for posting so late, but I tend to agree with the OP. Guys and gals who take solo trips tend to "humble brag" and/or puff up their chests a bit when discussing their solo adventures. A ten-day trip with a buddy? Not much to talk about...but a ten-day solo? That's worth a little extra.
And maybe it's deserved. I take solo trips, and I recognize in others the same tendencies I see in myself. A solo trip *is* different and *does* include extra risk. People on this site accomplish amazing things. And I'm proud of my solo experiences, too. But I do think there's a bit of arrogance in the solo community. Of course, I'm not saying everyone does this, but....a quick look through the trip reports, and even the tenor of posts in different forums, will reveal a different tone (to my ears, at least) than is typically found in the non-solo reports/forums.
Just my .02. "


Wow, this is a first for me. I never even considered that. I've read a lot of trip reports and never experienced that feeling of a soloist being an elitist. I think we just report what we do, see, and feel on a solo. Who knows, maybe I'm an elitest and just am not aware.
 
jeepgirl
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11/30/2016 08:41AM  
If you want to brag about soloing, go for it. Personally I talk about every BWCA trip a lot. Simply because the bwca is that special to me.
We are not elitist. Its just what we do. I solo for me. For me to find my peace in this crazy world.
 
11/30/2016 11:28AM  
i've been doing solo trips for about 35 years. the experience is very personal, much different than a group trip. i typically don't talk about them to anyone unless something really unusual has happened. my wife never asks how my solo trips were. i'm not interested in how other people do their trips, i am comfortable doing things my way. i don't think others would be interested in how i trip. it's kind of hard to be elitist when you're by yourself.

i often paddle wood/canvas canoes. i do this because i love them and am strong enough to carry them. people have paddled these things for years and it was no big deal. now however if your canoe weights more than fifty pounds you are viewed as some type of pitiable rube. there is a certain snobbishness with canoe brands, as if spending absurd amounts of money on a canoe makes you a superior canoeist.
 
11/30/2016 01:57PM  
At first read I got the thought some soloist were trying to "shine" their accomplishment and others perhaps encouraging this, after all we have our own special group on this forum. Reading the posts I get a different take.
Like many I grew up spending a lot of time alone and living on a farm much of that was keeping busy at some chore. As an adult I can work hard all day and enjoy playing hard all day. Paddling or hiking in the wilderness is hard play. Neighbors call me "the animal" and I think it nothing special. As the commercial says, "It's just what they do.", and it is just who I am.
 
11/30/2016 02:34PM  
I never gave it any thought that rolling solo was any different.
I have been solo backpacking and canoeing for over 40 years, it was just the way I roll.
I only discovered this website two years ago, and never gave it any thought, however I must admit that I do like talk to other outdoors people about my trips, and enjoy stating they were "Solo" trips.

Perhaps us solo people realize the extra risk involved, and due to that we have a heightened sense of our surroundings and situation, which then gets reflected in how we relay our experiences to others.

People in AK who are familiar with the consequences of going solo in heavy Griz country, do express some concern for me traveling solo. But I never felt I was doing anything extra ordinary.
(OK Carmike, I may have just inadvertently made/reinforced your point with the my last sentence)
 
11/30/2016 02:35PM  
Fair point, TomT. I could certainly be reading too much into the posts, and there's room for different interpretations, that's for sure.

But I'm sticking with my original hypothesis. :)
 
11/30/2016 04:31PM  
Soloing's not hard.
Leading a youth group. Now that's hard.
 
11/30/2016 05:24PM  
Soloing is a different experience, a different perspective, but I've never noticed the tone you speak of, carmike. Well, OK, maybe Magic Paddler bragging about driving through Chicago alone ;). I might just be tone deaf though, and people do have different perceptions, so I can't say you're wrong.

I'd agree with AmarilloJim that soloing's not hard after so many of them, but thinking about taking some newbies in . . . ? And that's what I'll be doing next year. I don't even consider soloing all that much more dangerous than going with another person.
 
BlueSkiesWI
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11/30/2016 09:45PM  
I can agree with everyone that said a lot of people can't fathom me going on a solo trip, especially in college. Nobody ever spends more than 30 minutes without contact with another person, so going even 3 days only talking to yourself really isn't something they've ever experienced. I know I'm guilty of being on my phone a lot, so soloing shines for me so I remind myself I don't need to be so dependent on phones!
 
Alan Gage
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11/30/2016 10:06PM  
I'll agree with Carmike and also admit that I've been guilty of "humble bragging" (I like that term) about my solos at times. I don't think it's pervasive, intentional, or offensive but I do think it's there. Just like I think at times Quetico paddlers subtly make it known they paddle in the Q and not the BWCA for various reasons.

Alan
 
12/01/2016 07:47AM  
quote Alan Gage:Just like I think at times Quetico paddlers subtly make it known they paddle in the Q and not the BWCA for various reasons.
Alan "


I say this but I'm not bragging it's just a preference. Quetico is a whole different experience vs. the BW. After many trips in the BW I just want a more quality experience. I want better "quality" for my experience seeing I only go once a year at best. I don't humble brag, I just state that I like a better quality experience and I am willing to jump through the hoops and pay more for it.

It's like beer, you can drink mass produced local or you can search out better quality. Guess what I drink? I enjoy quality things. Am I a snob? Am I bragging? I'll call it "not settling".




 
12/01/2016 07:47AM  




 
12/03/2016 08:08AM  
quote missmolly: "I think sometimes soloing is elevated to a shiny status it doesn't deserve, as if it's more significant than paddling with others.

Sure, I get the night heeby-jeebies the first few nights, but beyond that, I'm not a whole lot safer in the woods or on the water with a pal than alone and we all do a more dangerous solo activity everyday, which is driving, sharing the road with drunks, methheads, and texters."


Alright, let's get back on topic. Specifically the phrase that solo paddling is suggested to be more significant than paddling with others.

For me I grew up doing things as a group but also ventured out by myself to fish or hunt with my pellet gun as a teenager so wasn't a stranger to being alone for part of a day. I was 24 when I took my first weeklong BW solo. It was very significant for me at the time as it was a huge leap being the first time I was alone overnight camping.

That trip was a gigantic personal milestone. It was a challenge coming out of my comfort zone on several levels. So is soloing more significant? You better believe it! Until, that is - we achieve a comfort level with it. For me it was probably around my 4th solo where I knew I could do it and didn't experience the anxiety and worry of the first three.

I've gone solo seven times now and I would say it is way more challenging now to be with a group. The tables have been turned for me. Now for me personally it's more significant (and difficult) to go with a group.
 
hobbydog
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12/03/2016 12:36PM  
quote TomT: " I was 24 when I took my first weeklong BW solo. It was very significant for me at the time as it was a huge leap being the first time I was alone overnight camping.

That trip was a gigantic personal milestone. It was a challenge coming out of my comfort zone on several levels. So is soloing more significant? You better believe it! Until, that is - we achieve a comfort level with it. For me it was probably around my 4th solo where I knew I could do it and didn't experience the anxiety and worry of the first three.

I've gone solo seven times now and I would say it is way more challenging now to be with a group. The tables have been turned for me. Now for me personally it's more significant (and difficult) to go with a group.
"


A very similar experience. First solo, and soloing in areas more remote than the BWCA were big personal achievements for me. I felt a strong need to share that experience. The sharing was a little bit paying it forward as well because of much encouragement from others on the forum and help in getting started down the solo path. Is that shining a light on it....sure, maybe to encourage others to find the deep thing you just experienced.

I don't think it is much different than a first timer BWCA experiences. If it was positive, they want to share that with others in a shiny way.

Is it wrong to share personal accomplishments? In a day were people live vicariously through sports teams and TV reality shows I think it is refreshing to see people setting personal goals, achieving them and sharing them in a shiny light that may encourage others to take the leap.
 
12/04/2016 08:35AM  
quote hobbydog: "The sharing was a little bit paying it forward as well because of much encouragement from others on the forum and help in getting started down the solo path. Is that shining a light on it....sure, maybe to encourage others to find the deep thing you just experienced.

Is it wrong to share personal accomplishments? In a day were people live vicariously through sports teams and TV reality shows I think it is refreshing to see people setting personal goals, achieving them and sharing them in a shiny light that may encourage others to take the leap.
"


Right. I think it's perfectly normal for people to be very apprehensive about going solo in a wilderness area. We get all kinds of warnings from family and friends about all the "what if" scenarios.

Then by reading solo trip reports the person decides to break free of the limiting beliefs that keep most people "playing it safe". Maybe they will ultimately find out it's not for them but at least they went out and experienced it for themselves. Those are the people I respect, not the armchair paddlers who warn of bears and broken legs.

So yes, shine that light and "cast a vision to part the seas so others can go forth." Sorry, I was reading some philosophy this morning... :)


 
12/04/2016 10:04AM  
The idea of rightness or wrongness is the core of the IP, if I get you correctly MissMolly. If you had chosen bragging over shining it would be easy. I agree with hobbydog's question about sharing an accomplishment being okay and I would hope it is.
To me it is a matter of reporting or commenting. The media used to simply report what was happening with little interpretation or commentary. Today it is more commentary than reporting. And I suspect that commentary is political, not inclusive of what really happened and directed at making our decisions for us. If the fish I caught becomes a fish story then perhaps it is commentary but not good fishing advice.
So for the most part when I read posts on this forum I hear people report their trip events and when commentary is offered it is most often owned as such. Not much shining going on here. Probably one of the reasons it is such a good forum.
 
12/16/2016 09:13PM  
I never thought of this forum of "shining" or "bragging". Sometimes we share things here because like some have posted they miss people to share certain experiences with. I think this forum is better, because we can share stuff we're excited about and you know your talking to people who get it. The coolest thing about bwca.com is people of all ages, backgrounds, professions, and gender can share and relate what we all love... Even solos. :)
 
cgchase
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12/22/2016 12:48PM  
I can see what you're talking about - but it's not that way at all for me. I go solo out of necessity. If I could get anybody to come with me that would be my preference. I mean . .it's a fine line . .I usually can get *somebody* to come . .but not somebody who is capable in the outdoors, has similar goals for wilderness trips and can get time off work, family at the same time as me . .it's like trying to get the stars to align . .

So I go solo instead of not going. And I bore the crap out of myself . .always manage to catch some awesome fish that nobody but me sees . .sigh . . .but it's much better than not going. And it's much better than going with an incompatible person.
 
12/22/2016 04:40PM  
quote missmolly: "I think sometimes soloing is elevated to a shiny status it doesn't deserve, as if it's more significant than paddling with others.

Full disclosure: I prefer soloing for the convenience. I don't have to coordinate with others on trip dates. I get to pack exactly the food I prefer. I don't have to wait for a paddling pal to make coffee or extract themselves from the tent to go fishing. I don't have to double back to fetch a partner who was too groggy to rise and shine at 4 a.m.

However, these are all a matter of convenience. Sure, I get the night heeby-jeebies the first few nights, but beyond that, I'm not a whole lot safer in the woods or on the water with a pal than alone and we all do a more dangerous solo activity everyday, which is driving, sharing the road with drunks, methheads, and texters."


When I first read this miss molly, I thought it was "do you have shinings" as in "The Shining" which....admittedly...would be a totally different experience out there in the backcountry :).
 
12/23/2016 07:54AM  
quote nctry: "I never thought of this forum of "shining" or "bragging". Sometimes we share things here because like some have posted they miss people to share certain experiences with. I think this forum is better, because we can share stuff we're excited about and you know your talking to people who get it. The coolest thing about bwca.com is people of all ages, backgrounds, professions, and gender can share and relate what we all love... Even solos. :)"

Right on. I look at this forum as a small club. I can confide in this group. I can post things I wouldn't otherwise in forums here. Face it, soloers are seen by the masses as eccentrics. They look at us sideways. I've learned to be completely comfortable with that as I've gotten older. But here, here I can let it all out. and I appreciate this place for that.

 
12/23/2016 10:50PM  
quote TomT: "quote nctry: "I never thought of this forum of "shining" or "bragging". Sometimes we share things here because like some have posted they miss people to share certain experiences with. I think this forum is better, because we can share stuff we're excited about and you know your talking to people who get it. The coolest thing about bwca.com is people of all ages, backgrounds, professions, and gender can share and relate what we all love... Even solos. :)"
By

Right on. I look at this forum as a small club. I can confide in this group. I can post things I wouldn't otherwise in forums here. Face it, soloers are seen by the masses as eccentrics. They look at us sideways. I've learned to be completely comfortable with that as I've gotten older. But here, here I can let it all out. and I appreciate this place for that.


"




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