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03/22/2017 12:36PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I've got a trip for the first week of August putting in at Cross Bay and exiting Poplar/Caribou.

I'm trying to get the tackle box put together and thought I'd ask the experts.
So far I've got:
Rapala Tail Dancers/Deep Tail Dancers
Larger Shad Raps 7/9 and Countdowns
A few original floaters
Deep husky jerks
Top water poppers
1/8 - 1/4 oz jigs and roadrunners
Zulu type plastics

Just wondering if there's anything obvious missing. Not really trying for lakers, but would like to hit walleye, SMB, and pike. I did get one of those small Deeper sonars for a really good deal.

Thanks
 
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fishtales
member (41)member
 
03/22/2017 01:01PM  
my 2 cents. Im a big believer in slip bobbers and plain hooks, as well as jigs. Both with live bait. leeches/crawlers at that time of year. Baits a little fussy to bring in, but should survive 3-4 days if it you keep the leech water fresh and the crawlers in the shade, or better yet, a cooler if you're bringing one.
 
mastertangler
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03/22/2017 01:13PM  
quote fishtales: "my 2 cents. Im a big believer in slip bobbers and plain hooks, as well as jigs. Both with live bait. leeches/crawlers at that time of year. Baits a little fussy to bring in, but should survive 3-4 days if it you keep the leech water fresh and the crawlers in the shade, or better yet, a cooler if you're bringing one."

Yup that is the route I would be taking as well. August on the smaller lakes can be one tough son-of-a-gun. On the larger lakes that have a cisco forage base (think Basswood) deep diving cranks can score well on walleye and pike. I believe the Zulu presentation is pretty much over in August (Mike correct me if I am wrong) and tubes would probably be better.

Think live bait, think 6lb quality line, think small hooks and think good knots and good things will happen. I only troll cranks in August because live bait is outlawed in the Quetico otherwise i would be "all in" with a big flat of conditioned "super" crawlers and a bunch of leeches.

Even then fish don't jump in the boat, especially in August. Fish tend to be concentrated as opposed to being spread out as in the spring and early summer. Offshore reefs hold walleye and better pike. The smallies in August are still a mystery for me. The best I have done was in 55' of water where I caught several ordinary 3lb green bass trolling a deep diving crank bait. I believe those fish were coming up off the bottom to smash it as I could see marks on my depth finder right on bottom. I probably should of dropped down some jigging spoons but I failed to exploit the "hint" and failed to focus and choose instead to be inflexible (Bad choice). I would like to go back to that deep basin sometime in late summer and give it a real go.
 
03/22/2017 01:35PM  
Was going to bring in some leeches, but forgot to mention it.

I always learn so much from reading this fishing forum.

Thanks.
 
QueticoMike
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03/22/2017 03:17PM  
Zulus will still be productive in the first week of August. I mostly use the 5 inch jerk shad made by ZMAN called ShadZ now. But don't overlook large tube baits in either watermelon or green pumpkin.

Booyah double willow blade chartreuse spinner bait with chartreuse blades - 3/8oz.

Red and white daredevil spoon.

#5 Mepps white bucktail

When fishing strictly for pike use a thin wire titanium leader - 6 to 9 inch.
 
mastertangler
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03/22/2017 03:40PM  
quote Jonesy: "Was going to bring in some leeches, but forgot to mention it.


I always learn so much from reading this fishing forum.


Thanks. "


Make sure you care for your leeches properly.......and when you leave them overnight in the water be certain they are out of the reach of the resident snapper. My first time with leeches was when I gave some Darky lake campers a lake trout and they gave me a locker full of leeches that the previous campers had left. In the morning I got to sneak up on a large snapper which had tore into my bag and was eating my leeches one at a time (Rats!). Any fish kept on a stringer will also get eaten if left in plain view by a snapper or a buzzard or an eagle.

I have hence learned to stash my bait/fish in some pockets of water surrounded by submerged bushes.

Don't overlook crawlers. You can get a small sturdy styrofoam box of 100 and they seem to travel rather well. The book "Lunkers love nightcrawlers" tells how its done and just as importantly how to care for your crawlers. A burlap sack kept wet will help keep them cool if its smokin hot out. If 1 dies it needs to be pulled or it will kill the entire box.

Mikes advice is good......note the larger lure size. I might even go 1/2 oz with the spinner bait. All things equal think deeper than spring and 15ft is a good starting depth IMO for walleye and pike. Mike seems to have a pattern of moving water (river inflow) for August smallies and is a bit of info which should cause the average angler to sit up and pay attention.

I also like his spoon advice.......get a decent sized one and use the 9" titanium leader. The titanium will set you back some but last and last with quality snaps and swivels. Spoons are not to be ignored and are quite versatile being able to fish shallow and deep, trolled or cast. Red and white is the classic as is the 5 of diamonds but I have done best on Crackle Frog which you will likely have to order. I am surprised that Mike did not include his Lucky 13 which is a big noisy topwater which is what you need in August. Something capable of bringing a fish up from deeper water.
 
QueticoMike
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03/22/2017 04:57PM  
I didn't mention the Lucky 13 due to Jonesy saying he had topwater poppers. I didn't want to overwhelm someone with a bunch a suggestions that already has a good start, I figured a few might help. I think a person can do just fine with Jonesy's current selection.

And yes, if you see moving water and it is deep enough to hold fish, fish it.
 
shock
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03/23/2017 04:57PM  
1 rapala product I don't see on your list 1/2oz rattln raps. Chrome black and orange crawdad are 2 of my favorite colors. Cast them out count them down then rip them back. Pike love them might want to use a leader ?
 
mastertangler
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03/23/2017 06:21PM  
quote shock: "1 rapala product I don't see on your list 1/2oz rattln raps. Chrome black and orange crawdad are 2 of my favorite colors. Cast them out count them down then rip them back. Pike love them might want to use a leader ? "

I like it.......let them hit bottom and like Shock says rip them back. Look into the Knot2Kinky leader material in say 12 or 16lb test.......very skinny and will still catch some walleye.
 
gqualls
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03/23/2017 07:00PM  
Jonesy,
You may want to consider a #3 Mepps Aglia. If you don't have any email me your addy and I'll send you a few. I made up a bunch of them several years ago and have some leftovers. I believe the fish will hit them in August, especially early and late in the day.
 
bassnet
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03/23/2017 07:09PM  
As alluded by previous posters, you will have the luxury of dealing with fish that have established patterns. For instance, when the wind comes up in the morning, baitfish follow the windblown plankton....the baitfish contact a reef(structure change)....and get whacked by waiting, wily Walleye. The point is, patterns you find will probably hold up for weeks at a time. You may be able to set up a "milk" run. Topwater around weedbeds 'til full light, maybe cranks around reefs (top, side) with the stirring of the wind, and drowning leeches somewhere(depth?) around reefs when the sun is getting high in the sky. Predators are there, and they will be back because they are there yesterday, and the day before, etc.

Maximize prime times, and that will be low light. An hour before sunrise, sunset 'til dark, cloudy, drizzled.....dude, ya live for a slow, drippy day in summer.

 
03/23/2017 07:39PM  
Wow, really appreciate the responses. Insight into fish habits is super helpful. I think most of the tools are covered, but techniques, etc I still need to learn.

I've got some silver and gold Mepps spinners and a few rattln raps.

Thanks!
 
mastertangler
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03/24/2017 05:26AM  
Heres a hint jonesy........there is a reason Stu doesn't guide in August and thats because the easy fishing is over.

Throw all your topwaters and spinners you want and when you start thinking the fishing sucks then its time to do something different........been there many times in August. Lots of guys will just tell you low light conditions and to me that means about 3 A.M. in August and I am still in the sack.

Not trying to rain on your parade........just if you strike out then its time to fish where the fish are at and that is deep. I am still catching walleye at dark in 20ft of water in August (yes I have to turn my backlight on my depth finder). Your starting point IMO for walleye and pike should be 15ft and that is your low light starting point. After 9 A.M. you should be fishing 20ft and by noon you should be at 30ft (yes you can still catch walleye right in the middle of the day if you fish where they are at).

So the trick is how to efficiently fish deeper water. Take advantage of the conditions......light winds mean drifting with Lindy rigs or jigs tipped with leeches. Keep the angle of your line at no more than a 45 degree and your bait within a foot or so of the bottom. If you have a hard time keeping that angle (say the drift is quick) you must go to a bit heavier jig. A vertical angle suggests you have to heavy a jig.........the key is to have the lightest jig possible and still have it at about a 45 degree angle. So a variety of jig weights is crucial and more important tools in August than a whole pile of lures.

If you have difficulty still connecting (or if its a bit to windy to drift) then its trolling time and you can prospect the water and start to learn it. I always start out trolling far and wide to get a lay of the land. That means a deep diving crank bait. Lots of them out there but they need to run at least 25ft in August and that starts to narrow the field considerably. It is hard to beat the larger Tail Dancer in purple or better yet rainbow trout.......the rest of the colors you can have IMO. Bang it around until you catch some fish and then go back to those areas with your jig and leech combo.

You can still catch some smaller fish shallow.........14" fish are still largely is water less than 15ft. Big fish can still come up but that will be the exception and probably 90% of the time they will be deeper than 15ft IMHO during the month of August.

 
03/24/2017 08:42AM  
Most of my initial list of Rapalas was taken from an older BWJ article (Darrel Brauer maybe?) on late summer fishing which advocated trolling with larger tail dancers and shad raps in 20+ feet of water to locate fish. Also some deep reef runners.

MT, thanks for the confirmation on the trolling. Will plan to start with the leech tipped jigs/lindy setup as you mentioned. Need to print this thread off and put it in my map case. I've got a few TDD 9/11s in the purpledescent pattern.

We realize this is likely a harder time for fishing, but we will try one way or the other. It doesn't take many fish to impress us. Just wanted help to increase our chances.

Thanks
 
summerdaze
member (10)member
 
03/24/2017 09:05AM  
All of my BW trips are in early August, and besides what has been said here, I will add this- don't overlook weed edges and sunken timber for good smallmouths. We have caught countless 17-19" smallies in these types of areas and a ridiculous amount of eating sized pike (24-30") as well, mostly ranging 5-10' deep. Black/gold #9 Shap Raps, double willow spinnerbaits of various colors (white, black, red, chart/blue), Mepps #5 black fury (yellow/black), and torpedoes in green/yellow have been very consistent performers every year, and a number of other cranks that you have listed also have done well for us. Yes you will catch a lot of smaller fish too, but the bigger (not the biggest though) ones will be there too. One caveat though- every 30"+ pike I have caught in the BW in August has been over sunken reefs and off various points in 15-25+ ft of water, trolling cranks, so if your looking for a big fish, that's the way to go. I am not a walleye fisherman in the BW(blasphemy- I know, but I live 2 miles from one of the greatest Walleye factories in the country, so I scratch that itch at home), so I can't really speak to those. They are generally "incidental" catches for us while targeting the above areas.

When the above strategies don't work (and some days and weather patterns, they just don't), and fishing moving water isn't an option, then we move to sunken reefs, points to inlets, and do a lot of trolling until we find the fish.
 
mastertangler
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03/24/2017 09:36AM  
Excellent catch Summerdaze........

Indeed weeds are the exception to deep fish in August although sunken timber may be hard to find except in some shallow back bay. There may be some bruisers in the weeds as well.......Be advised, the weeds have had time to grow and they are strong, big fish like to bury up in deep weeds when they feel the sting of the hook. I like light tackle in canoe country but this is not for the faint of heart and a bit stouter line would be a good place to start.

I have had some good luck in the weeds with Chatterbaits. Lift and drop in the pockets and "whack"!
 
03/25/2017 06:52AM  
My 2 cents worth
I've always gone up in July or August because of my schedule. Have had my best luck late July and August. However the last 2 years was able to go up the first week of June and was really disappointed. I think I figured out how to fish late summer and haven't figured out the June bite. What I'm sayen is that if you know what you're doing you will catch fish in late July & August.
Baits
I always have gold & silver #4 mepps. They are my never fail smallmouth bait and will work for any species up there.
I troll a lindy rig with crawlers & leeches for eyes. Throw away the wimpy 3/8 oz. weight and replace them with 3/4/ to 1 oz. weights. You have to have your baits near the bottom and it's hard to get your bait on the bottom in over 10 feet of water with that small weight.
Plus all the other advice.
 
Herm
member (6)member
 
07/14/2017 07:52AM  
Jonesy,

I too have only gone to boundary waters in August due to my schedule (still a college student and hard to do other dates), and I still believe the fishing is great, nothing like September when I plan to go after school, but August can still be a lot of fun. I have not done a lot of fishing specifically targeting northerns because of how good the walleye are to eat, but I have had luck on northerns trolling deep the big daredevil spoons and deep diving cranks and deep runners. Also caught a big 37 incher on a 1/2 oz white spinner bait that I let sink to the bottom. This time of year the bigger fish are definitely sitting deeper and so you have to get down to them.

When targeting walleye I try to go out really early in the morning or really late in the evening. Walleye eyes are really light sensitive and so they like to avoid the sun as much as possible which is why they sit so deep during the day. If you have an overcast day or a rainy day get out there and target the walleye. My best day walleye fishing was on a rainy day and my partner and I caught 20+ in about 3 hours, you know it is a good day when you start throwing back 18-20 inchers for being too small to keep. That day they were close to the surface and were hitting the rapala x raps. Other than that I would recommend the deep diving cranks and deep runners and just troll around reefs and off points, if you find their hiding spot just keep trolling and you'll keep catching fish. I also believe that leeches are a great bet. I have trolled them a few different ways from dropshotting to weighted floating jig heads. I would strongly recommend smaller hooks and you will be catching fish on the leeches. be really diligent about keeping your leeches fresh and not letting them die, the walleye love the squirming action of them. Walleye this time of year really start to school so once you find a few fish that spot for a bit. another technique that I have used for bass that I've also incidentally found to be good for walleye is to use a blade bait, simply get it to the bottom and then bounce it off the bottom almost like a jig. I use it for deep water bass fishing in the summer and when using it in BW it was great for walleye and pike. For the smallmouth fishing I use the same techniques as in VA, fish early and late and try a bunch of different stuff. Small mouth fishing up there is my favorite. I would also take a small lure or two called joes flies, we use them in VA for stocked rainbow trout but they can be a ton of fun for catching crappie and bluegill when nothing else is working. throw one of them on with a weight about 18 inches from the lure and let it sink then retrieve. Crappie can be a ton of fun and are really good to eat as well.


Good luck and tight lines!
 
Spookmeister
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07/14/2017 11:36AM  
quote Herm: "Jonesy,


I too have only gone to boundary waters in August due to my schedule (still a college student and hard to do other dates), and I still believe the fishing is great, nothing like September when I plan to go after school, but August can still be a lot of fun. I have not done a lot of fishing specifically targeting northerns because of how good the walleye are to eat, but I have had luck on northerns trolling deep the big daredevil spoons and deep diving cranks and deep runners. Also caught a big 37 incher on a 1/2 oz white spinner bait that I let sink to the bottom. This time of year the bigger fish are definitely sitting deeper and so you have to get down to them.


When targeting walleye I try to go out really early in the morning or really late in the evening. Walleye eyes are really light sensitive and so they like to avoid the sun as much as possible which is why they sit so deep during the day. If you have an overcast day or a rainy day get out there and target the walleye. My best day walleye fishing was on a rainy day and my partner and I caught 20+ in about 3 hours, you know it is a good day when you start throwing back 18-20 inchers for being too small to keep. That day they were close to the surface and were hitting the rapala x raps. Other than that I would recommend the deep diving cranks and deep runners and just troll around reefs and off points, if you find their hiding spot just keep trolling and you'll keep catching fish. I also believe that leeches are a great bet. I have trolled them a few different ways from dropshotting to weighted floating jig heads. I would strongly recommend smaller hooks and you will be catching fish on the leeches. be really diligent about keeping your leeches fresh and not letting them die, the walleye love the squirming action of them. Walleye this time of year really start to school so once you find a few fish that spot for a bit. another technique that I have used for bass that I've also incidentally found to be good for walleye is to use a blade bait, simply get it to the bottom and then bounce it off the bottom almost like a jig. I use it for deep water bass fishing in the summer and when using it in BW it was great for walleye and pike. For the smallmouth fishing I use the same techniques as in VA, fish early and late and try a bunch of different stuff. Small mouth fishing up there is my favorite. I would also take a small lure or two called joes flies, we use them in VA for stocked rainbow trout but they can be a ton of fun for catching crappie and bluegill when nothing else is working. throw one of them on with a weight about 18 inches from the lure and let it sink then retrieve. Crappie can be a ton of fun and are really good to eat as well.

Glad to hear someone else enjoys fishing bladebaits in the boundary waters! I've always done better with them for walleye. Do you fish them any differently when targetting smallmouth?



Good luck and tight lines!"
 
Spookmeister
distinguished member (185)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/14/2017 11:50AM  
Ooops...will try again.
Glad to hear someone else enjoys fishing bladebaits in the boundary waters! I've always done better with them for walleye. Do you fish them any differently when targetting smallmouth?


quote Spookmeister: "quote Herm: "Jonesy,



I too have only gone to boundary waters in August due to my schedule (still a college student and hard to do other dates), and I still believe the fishing is great, nothing like September when I plan to go after school, but August can still be a lot of fun. I have not done a lot of fishing specifically targeting northerns because of how good the walleye are to eat, but I have had luck on northerns trolling deep the big daredevil spoons and deep diving cranks and deep runners. Also caught a big 37 incher on a 1/2 oz white spinner bait that I let sink to the bottom. This time of year the bigger fish are definitely sitting deeper and so you have to get down to them.



When targeting walleye I try to go out really early in the morning or really late in the evening. Walleye eyes are really light sensitive and so they like to avoid the sun as much as possible which is why they sit so deep during the day. If you have an overcast day or a rainy day get out there and target the walleye. My best day walleye fishing was on a rainy day and my partner and I caught 20+ in about 3 hours, you know it is a good day when you start throwing back 18-20 inchers for being too small to keep. That day they were close to the surface and were hitting the rapala x raps. Other than that I would recommend the deep diving cranks and deep runners and just troll around reefs and off points, if you find their hiding spot just keep trolling and you'll keep catching fish. I also believe that leeches are a great bet. I have trolled them a few different ways from dropshotting to weighted floating jig heads. I would strongly recommend smaller hooks and you will be catching fish on the leeches. be really diligent about keeping your leeches fresh and not letting them die, the walleye love the squirming action of them. Walleye this time of year really start to school so once you find a few fish that spot for a bit. another technique that I have used for bass that I've also incidentally found to be good for walleye is to use a blade bait, simply get it to the bottom and then bounce it off the bottom almost like a jig. I use it for deep water bass fishing in the summer and when using it in BW it was great for walleye and pike. For the smallmouth fishing I use the same techniques as in VA, fish early and late and try a bunch of different stuff. Small mouth fishing up there is my favorite. I would also take a small lure or two called joes flies, we use them in VA for stocked rainbow trout but they can be a ton of fun for catching crappie and bluegill when nothing else is working. throw one of them on with a weight about 18 inches from the lure and let it sink then retrieve. Crappie can be a ton of fun and are really good to eat as well.


Glad to hear someone else enjoys fishing bladebaits in the boundary waters! I've always done better with them for walleye. Do you fish them any differently when targetting smallmouth?



Good luck and tight lines!"
"
 
wolfpack21
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07/14/2017 12:28PM  
Lots of good late summer fishing info here. I used to do only late summer trips, and my most consistent methods began with getting a good map, then trolling 15'+ down on the edges of mid-lake humps and reefs, as well as along points dropping off to deep water. We'd begin trolling one bright and one dark color lure to see what worked better. I've caught plenty of big august walleye trolling large lures, and you'll have better odds enticing a lunker pike to bite that way too, so don't shy away from adding a little drag to the canoe by pulling something big. If we had consistency in a spot with walleye, we'd switch to jigging. Troll to catch the big pike and find the walleye, and once you find the eyes take a break and jig a bit.
 
CampFam
member (6)member
 
07/14/2017 08:28PM  
Heading in in a couple weeks, and I'm super glad this thread got bumped up. Thanks to everyone for sharing their knowledge and experiences! We trip as a family, and fishing is not our primary goal, but, the info shared here truly helps us make the most of the time we do get to fish, and really helps me target in on the tackle to take, in limited space and weight.

ds
 
Mnpat
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07/15/2017 08:18AM  
As pointed out earlier on lakes with a good Cisco population troll deep divers around 30' down near reefs that come out of Deep water and in the basin of the lake in water 40 to 100+ feet deep. The largest walleyes in the lake will be there.
 
Kalvan
member (31)member
 
07/21/2017 04:37PM  
Jonesy: I'm doing nearly that same route about three weeks after you, would be interested in hearing how it went when you get back. Enjoy!
 
07/23/2017 03:04PM  
Kalvan: We still want to do Cross Bay to Poplar, but my wife has recently had some knee issues causing us to rethink the Kiskadinna portage. We may stick around Long Island/Cherokee/Frost. Still better than not going.

Will report back.
 
Kalvan
member (31)member
 
07/23/2017 04:59PM  
Understood, no worries. Our plan is to do two nights on Long Island so would still be interested in any tips from that part of your trip.

Cherokee and Frost are nice. Went there four years ago in early June and only caught trout. Spend more time fishing on Frost than Cherokee!
 
Herm
member (6)member
 
07/24/2017 03:13PM  
quote Spookmeister: "Ooops...will try again.
Glad to hear someone else enjoys fishing bladebaits in the boundary waters! I've always done better with them for walleye. Do you fish them any differently when targetting smallmouth?



quote>"
"


I tend to fish them very similarly as I would for walleye, bouncing them off the bottom with a steady or incremented retrieve. When fishing for largemouth in deep water in Indiana I often accidentally catch walleye using the same technique.
 
greywolf33
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07/25/2017 02:48PM  
At that time of year in that area, I favor live bait options. My preferred presentation is crawlers and leeches slow trolled with bottom bouncers and spinner rigs, followed by lindy rigs, vertical jigging and lighted slip bobbers in low light conditions. IMO a tackle box filled with live bait tackle will be lighter, more versatile and more productive than carrying all of those artificials. As a bonus, the weight you'll save will allow you to carry more of your favorite whisky. Best of luck to you!
 
Zanzinger
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
 
08/06/2018 12:49PM  
Bumping for valuable information this time of year.
 
Quacker1
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08/07/2018 01:51PM  
I love this blog, when you ask a question or ask for help you always get what you asked for an much more.

I'm coming up the end of Aug and into Sept. any changes to the menu for this period of time.
 
MichiganJohn
member (27)member
 
08/07/2018 05:24PM  
BWCA.com fishing forum... better than any fishing magazine out there. Heading up to Basswood on Friday, just gleaned all kinds of great info from this thread. Thanks all!!!
 
Tristian5431
senior member (57)senior membersenior member
 
05/24/2019 12:02PM  
Headed up for my first trip this summer. I will be lodging at Nor'Wester Lodge and hanging out around Poplar lake. I have a newborn (3 mos) and my wife so I won't get a chance to go to crazy. I would love to catch a few fish and have a good time outdoors! I am hoping the nights are clear (clouds) so I can take some cool astrophotogrpahy!
 
barehook
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05/25/2019 07:06AM  
Agreed with all, except I take a little different approach to jigging. As much as possible, I fish straight down, almost like crappie fishing. Any 'tap' and I set the hook. I'm baiting with unadorned jig head tipped with leech or a piece of nightcrawler. This way I can regularly feel for the bottom, but stay reasonably snag free. And if i do feel the weight of a snag, I can almost always 'pop' it off before it gets wedged.

This means I'm willing fish a heavy enough jig head to achieve the 'straight down' approach. Mastertangler (or others), feel free to 'set me straight' on the advantages of using a lighter jig head. I haven't been able to tell, for example, that I get less bites with 1/8 oz as opposed to a 1/4 oz, but I'm open minded to others' experiences. I will say my confidence level is much higher if I am positive I'm fishing within a foot or so of the bottom. Find a school, and this can be the best time of the year for catching walleye, (and with some real lunker smallies thrown in as well). Keep a marker handy and throw it as soon as you catch one.

The 18-28 foot depths on mid-lake reefs have been magic for me, no matter what time of day. Fishing stained waters, not clear.

mastertangler: "Heres a hint jonesy........there is a reason Stu doesn't guide in August and thats because the easy fishing is over.


Throw all your topwaters and spinners you want and when you start thinking the fishing sucks then its time to do something different........been there many times in August. Lots of guys will just tell you low light conditions and to me that means about 3 A.M. in August and I am still in the sack.


Not trying to rain on your parade........just if you strike out then its time to fish where the fish are at and that is deep. I am still catching walleye at dark in 20ft of water in August (yes I have to turn my backlight on my depth finder). Your starting point IMO for walleye and pike should be 15ft and that is your low light starting point. After 9 A.M. you should be fishing 20ft and by noon you should be at 30ft (yes you can still catch walleye right in the middle of the day if you fish where they are at).


So the trick is how to efficiently fish deeper water. Take advantage of the conditions......light winds mean drifting with Lindy rigs or jigs tipped with leeches. Keep the angle of your line at no more than a 45 degree and your bait within a foot or so of the bottom. If you have a hard time keeping that angle (say the drift is quick) you must go to a bit heavier jig. A vertical angle suggests you have to heavy a jig.........the key is to have the lightest jig possible and still have it at about a 45 degree angle. So a variety of jig weights is crucial and more important tools in August than a whole pile of lures.


If you have difficulty still connecting (or if its a bit to windy to drift) then its trolling time and you can prospect the water and start to learn it. I always start out trolling far and wide to get a lay of the land. That means a deep diving crank bait. Lots of them out there but they need to run at least 25ft in August and that starts to narrow the field considerably. It is hard to beat the larger Tail Dancer in purple or better yet rainbow trout.......the rest of the colors you can have IMO. Bang it around until you catch some fish and then go back to those areas with your jig and leech combo.


You can still catch some smaller fish shallow.........14" fish are still largely is water less than 15ft. Big fish can still come up but that will be the exception and probably 90% of the time they will be deeper than 15ft IMHO during the month of August.


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