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      Acts of kindness or a helpful hand in the BWCA-Quetico     
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Pinetree
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03/18/2018 10:30AM
Pass it On the kindness of the BWCA folks.
Many of you have some great stories much better than mine of people whom went out of the way or just showed a little extra deed of goodness. I know we had this thread before but these kind of stories I like hearing again.

With so much negativity today

I though it would be nice to hear acts of Kindness in the BWCA or Quetico which are common among us canoe-campers.. I know many people here have helped others when in need or just something simple deed. I also know there are stories much better than mine.
I do remember when doing a solo canoe trip from Little Isabella to Snake river entry point and a person from Wilderness Outfitters seeing me walking back to the Little Isabella entry point and stopped and asked if I want a ride to my truck,which I gladly took. It was July 3rd 1999 the day before the monster wind storm.
Also I remember the Forest service personnel and a Outfitter once in the fall on there day off looking for a lost dog from a couple that tipped over on Isabella lake. The outfitter many days later coaxed the timid dog into at a campsite and called the folks that they rescued their dog and they can come back up north and get their dog.
Acts may be small like a little kindling wood left to start a fire to helping out in a medical emergency.

Your Story?
 
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Savage Voyageur
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03/18/2018 10:50AM
A big pile of split wood at a campsite was waiting for the next camper,me. It was recommended to me by an old guy I met on the entry point. I now try to practice this when I leave the site.

Another is our groups have always asked if the other group on the other side of the portage needs help with thier packs. We can haul gear both ways to help them out if they want.

I’ve had groups tell me where the fish are biting, gave me a tub of night crawlers they did not need.
 
03/18/2018 11:02AM
The first thing I remember happening is sitting on a portage with a group going the opposite direction . We were heading to lis and they to moose River North. So they tossed us the keys to their truck so we had a way back to mine and their truck was waiting for them when they got out. 1977 maybe?
Numerous times helped and was helped across portages.
Outfitter sent in a steak and a couple beers to me on day 15 of my 26 day shot in WCPP.
This couple I stumbled upon on finger lake on my 40 day trip shared a gourmet cup of coffee a real chair and great conversation. I believe it was the captain of the black pearl, his first mate and their little daughter (at the time) Aurora.
 
bobbernumber3
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03/18/2018 11:05AM
Our group of three Dads and three sons was invited to share a campsite on Ottertrack in the Q after a long day of paddling into headwinds. We were exhausted and so appreciated their offer!

Thanks Ladies!
 
mastertangler
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03/18/2018 12:07PM
I always encourage portagers who ask me "How much further" with the response "Your almost there" ;-)

Just helping make the world a better, more positive place in my own little way!
 
missmolly
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03/18/2018 12:11PM
Savage Voyageur: "A big pile of split wood at a campsite was waiting for the next camper,me. It was recommended to me by an old guy I met on the entry point. I now try to practice this when I leave the site.


Another is our groups have always asked if the other group on the other side of the portage needs help with thier packs. We can haul gear both ways to help them out if they want.


I’ve had groups tell me where the fish are biting, gave me a tub of night crawlers they did not need. "


I am always amazed by stories of split wood awaiting folks. It's a lot of work to portage an ax and split wood and to do that for someone you'll never meet! Wow.
 
OldTripper
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03/18/2018 01:32PM
Savage Voyageur: "Another is our groups have always asked if the other group on the other side of the portage needs help with thier packs. We can haul gear both ways to help them out if they want. "

One time I was at the Knife Lake / Seed Lake portage on my way out.
I met some folks in the middle of the portage and said a friendly Hi as we passed. When I got to the Seed Lake side I could see they had a lot of gear, I mean a lot!
It was older gear, well seasoned. I admired that.
So on my return for the last of my gear I grabbed two of their Duluth packs and headed back to Knife. Once again we met in the middle. To my surprise they had grabbed my remaining pack and paddles. And to their surprise I had a couple of their packs. We both continued on without saying much. On my trip back to my canoe we again met in the middle of the portage. This time they were ready for a break so they dropped their packs and we began to chat. After visiting a while I finally asked this older gentleman his name. Turns out it was Chuck Carey. I thought that was pretty cool.
 
Pinetree
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03/18/2018 02:52PM
nctry: "The first thing I remember happening is sitting on a portage with a group going the opposite direction . We were heading to lis and they to moose River North. So they tossed us the keys to their truck so we had a way back to mine and their truck was waiting for them when they got out. 1977 maybe?
Numerous times helped and was helped across portages.
Outfitter sent in a steak and a couple beers to me on day 15 of my 26 day shot in WCPP.
This couple I stumbled upon on finger lake on my 40 day trip shared a gourmet cup of coffee a real chair and great conversation. I believe it was the captain of the black pearl, his first mate and their little daughter (at the time) Aurora."


That is really cool. Giving you their car keys so you could get back to your vechile and also benefit them so their vechile would be at the right access. Very trustworthy on their part. Neat.
 
riverrunner
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03/19/2018 09:04AM
I always ask if I can carry someone pack over a portage if I am going back empty handed done it many times.
 
Pinetree
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03/19/2018 09:07AM
It seems camping people our at a higher level of kindness than anywhere else you may be. Its like when life is a little more simple and basic people becomes a little more socialable(sp) and relaxed and willing to help each other.
 
JustinLinnell1
member (43)member
 
03/19/2018 09:22AM
A friend and I came across an old guy & his dad entering Beaverhouse and carried a lot of their gear down to the landing for them. The older gentleman must have been over 80 at a minimum. He was struggling at the end to carry their small canoe over the portage & was tired when he finally made it. The look of gratitude on his face when he saw all his gear at the landing was worth a million bucks. It was quite likely his last trip, I hope we made it a little easier for him.
 
missmolly
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03/19/2018 09:46AM
JustinLinnell1: "A friend and I came across an old guy & his dad entering Beaverhouse and carried a lot of their gear down to the landing for them. The older gentleman must have been over 80 at a minimum. He was struggling at the end to carry their small canoe over the portage & was tired when he finally made it. The look of gratitude on his face when he saw all his gear at the landing was worth a million bucks. It was quite likely his last trip, I hope we made it a little easier for him. "

I love that you did that. Thank you.
 
03/19/2018 01:43PM
In 2015 my 80 pound son and I were paddling the Granite River on our last day, into about 25-30 MPH winds, and even with the weight distributed in the canoe the best we could, we couldn't make any headway. We were supposed to get picked up at Sag Falls and weren't going to make it anywhere near on time.

A family of 5, with 3 boys, camping near Devil's Elbow saw our difficulties, and insisted we join up with them. They put my son in the middle of their 3 seat canoe, and lent me one of their older, stronger sons for the front of my canoe, and we all paddled out the last 3 hours or so together.

I recently tracked them down and thanked them again. Their boys run a fishing/hunting website, if you google 3 Brothers Flies you'll find their site.

 
hobbydog
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03/19/2018 07:12PM
I was on day 12 of a 2 week WCPP trip. I had been a long warm day, no wind and very dry air. I had exited WCPP and paddled the 3 hours across Eagle and Midway Lake. As I approached the narrows to Chase Lake it was getting late in the day. There was an outpost cabin there and a boat just returning. I decided to stop, say high and take a break. I hadn't seen anyone for over a week. It was a father/son (Steve and Steve jr) from Apple Valley. After an introduction they offered me an ice cold diet coke and a salted nut roll. It may sound little but it was so much appreciated. We swapped a few stories and I was on my way again but before I left they offered me another diet coke and salted nut roll to take along. I hope they know how much that was appreciated.
 
myceliaman
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03/19/2018 09:23PM
A few years back we were fishing below the falls on Rose. It was getting windy and we could see canoes approaching. 2 couples paddled up to us, they had old heavy gear, aluminum canoes and looked like they'd been onthe loosing end of a whoopin. They were tired, and looking for a camp site. We helped them on the stairway portage and pointed them towards an open site. It was our last night and we typically have a fish dinner. We knew those folks were eating dehys because the one lady mentioned how much she was not enjoying the hard work , heavy gear and bad food. So we whipped them up some baked lake trout, spuds and a flask of gd bourbon and delivered dinner to their camp. I'll always remember the smiles on their faces and the grumpy lady teared up on us. They noticed the Rockwood Lodge logo on our canoe contacted and asked Mike if he knew who we were. A week later we got a package, with a bottle of Makers and a heart felt thank you.
 
Warty
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03/20/2018 04:39AM
As my buddy and I were coming across Kawishiwi Lake, returning from Malberg, we spotted a guy sitting in a chair at the campground. As we got closer, I said "Pete, that dude is just chilling in his chair and drinking beer, the finer things in life". Pete shouts out to him, "I'll give you a hundred bucks for one of those beers", we laugh, land the canoe and start the process of unloading. Like an angel coming down from heaven, Carl came over with a couple Castle Danger's to share with us. He wanted to hear all about the trip and brighten our day, one of the best beers I have had. God bless ya Carl, wherever your at!
 
plexmidwest
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03/20/2018 10:16AM
In 2007, my first BWCA trip with my 14 yr old son a group of three men camping on Ottertrack (BW side) invited us to join them for a fish fry. They had walleye, pike and smallies. Timing was good after a long day of paddling and did not have time to catch dinner.
John
 
SaganagaJoe
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03/20/2018 06:28PM
These stories are truly inspirational. Thank you all.
 
Pinetree
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03/20/2018 06:33PM
SaganagaJoe: "These stories are truly inspirational. Thank you all. "

They really are,they make you feel good all over.
 
Canoearoo
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03/21/2018 09:22AM
A few years ago my daughter left her camera on a portage. We had stopped to talk to a family and the kids played together. This family found her camera and took the time when they got home to find us (we had shared our name with them and where we were from) and let us know they had her camera. We met a few weeks later and got her camera back.

Another time we finished a portage and went to the take out. Once we were home I found out my fishing tackle bag/ditch kit with all my gear, and my fishing license was left at the last portage. I figured it was a lost cause and started pricing out the replacements. A week later I received a box with my fishing tackle bag/ditch kit in it. All it contained was a note saying they figured I would want it back and they hoped we had a good trip. No name, no return address, no way to thank them.
 
Mocha
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03/21/2018 10:08AM
myceliaman: "A few years back we were fishing below the falls on Rose. It was getting windy and we could see canoes approaching. 2 couples paddled up to us, they had old heavy gear, aluminum canoes and looked like they'd been onthe loosing end of a whoopin. They were tired, and looking for a camp site. We helped them on the stairway portage and pointed them towards an open site. It was our last night and we typically have a fish dinner. We knew those folks were eating dehys because the one lady mentioned how much she was not enjoying the hard work , heavy gear and bad food. So we whipped them up some baked lake trout, spuds and a flask of gd bourbon and delivered dinner to their camp. I'll always remember the smiles on their faces and the grumpy lady teared up on us. They noticed the Rockwood Lodge logo on our canoe contacted and asked Mike if he knew who we were. A week later we got a package, with a bottle of Makers and a heart felt thank you. "

i like this one. so you also portaged their dinner and your canoes up stairway portage? that is wonderful.
 
Pinetree
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03/25/2018 05:31PM
Lot of nice comments. Keep them coming. I like Positive stories than all the other we hear everyday lately.

Maybe a emergency helping hand story?
 
Pinetree
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03/25/2018 05:31PM
Lot of nice comments.
 
QuietWaters
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03/25/2018 06:24PM
I was on my first trip with my two brothers. They had previous experience canoeing local waters and one BWCA trip. We had a Man Chain permit; had a tow to Hook Island, made it to the ranger station and crossed Cache Bay without incident. As we were landing at the Silver Falls portage, I stepped on shore and was immediately stung by some insect, through my thick wool sock.

I have had mild reactions to bee stings, so was getting out the Benadryl to stop any reaction. The brothers unloaded the canoe, then decided since they hadn't filled their water bottles that they would go out to the middle of the lake to pump some water. By that time, I was feeling a little woozy and didn't realize what was happening until I heard some one coming off the portage say something like " Look, they must be practicing their rescue technique". I looked up and saw the brothers in the water with the canoe and paddles drifting to the top of the falls.

I remember yelling at the people on the portage that the brothers weren't practicing and needed help. They did have their life jackets on, but I found out later that one of them hadn't zipped his all the way and it slid down his body, pinning his arms. A couple of the guys on the portage hopped into their canoe, got our canoe and paddles and towed all including my brothers back to shore. We were so grateful they had come off that portage when they did as they really saved my brothers' lives. In the confusion afterwards, we never got their names, but if they are on this board, I want to give them a GREAT BIG THANK YOU.

We went on to have many more "adventures" that trip, but those are stories for another time. In spite of it all, I got wilderness canoeing in my blood and went on to have many more trips with one and both of my brothers.
 
shock
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03/25/2018 06:54PM
hobbydog: "I was on day 12 of a 2 week WCPP trip. I had been a long warm day, no wind and very dry air. I had exited WCPP and paddled the 3 hours across Eagle and Midway Lake. As I approached the narrows to Chase Lake it was getting late in the day. There was an outpost cabin there and a boat just returning. I decided to stop, say high and take a break. I hadn't seen anyone for over a week. It was a father/son (Steve and Steve jr) from Apple Valley. After an introduction they offered me an ice cold diet coke and a salted nut roll. It may sound little but it was so much appreciated. We swapped a few stories and I was on my way again but before I left they offered me another diet coke and salted nut roll to take along. I hope they know how much that was appreciated. " day 12 and they give you a cold coke and a salted nut roll , i'll bet that tasted ****** good !
 
poobah
member (33)member
 
03/25/2018 07:34PM
Thanks to Pinetree for this post. I've given, and been blessed to receive many acts of kindness through the years - recently the most humbling was the outpouring of support that was offered last year as I took my young son out for his first trip in the BWCA. A number of folks from that one post reached out to me, and solved all my gear issues in the snap of the finger. Bonus was that a true friendship was born, and my son met some deeply kind and selfless people who are uncommon where we live, so it offered huge learning for him. We pay it forward.
 
bwcadan
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03/26/2018 07:52PM
A long day of traveling to Tiger Bay had worn out a family of 5 who then found no open sites . We invited them in for the night and were happy to offer ideas for their trip. First we suggested they base camp right here on the southern end of the island as we were leaving by 6:00 AM. They needed a more easily achieved trip, and we suggested day trips to the areas they were going to visit. I hope they decided to take the 2 day version of what had been a hard trip for them to enter. They said they before we bent their ear that they would welcome any ideas from the above to how to set up camp including pitching a fly. I think we may have saved their trip from turning ugly to a successful outing for them.

As a Dr for the military, he provided me with information about a condition I had, but my Dr. had not really gotten through to me (I take blame for that) many of the aspects of it. A great trade for us both.

Condition is manageable with proper medication: I now know many more details.
 
jeroldharter
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03/27/2018 12:14AM
Lost and found:

I once exited from Tanner in Quetico by boat transfer. Somehow, I managed to forget my pfd at the last portage which was upstream in irrecoverable. I realized I did not have it as I was sitting in the back of the canoe at the pontoon pier waiting for the boat. All I could do was leave and think of a good rationalization for my wife!

I fly fish and in my PFD I had about $500 worth of odds and ends. Not happy about that. A couple months later I someone on this forum replied to my lost and found post. He picked up my pfd, took it home, and then shipped it to me at his own expense declining and reimbursement. Amazing good people here.
 
03/27/2018 07:30AM
Pinetree: "Maybe a emergency helping hand story?"


So, met up with a member from here (Unplanned) and we decided to travel together. I was prepping for my more ambitious trips. I saw a little drop before the portage and though oh fun. And hit it full steam... My canoe was grabbed and rolled so fast I didn't have a chance to react. Bud rushed to the rescue as both me and my stuff we're pushed by the current out away from any shore. His quick thinking had him cutting a chunk of my painter and using it to drag me to shore. I was not swimming well and on shore I couldn't stand well right away. Meanwhile my other motive was to meet up with a friend I'd put in two weeks earlier. He saw only the tipped canoe when across the portage, so he summoned a couple of guys fishing to come over and possibly help with rescue. Little did he know it was me. Haha. Meanwhile, Bud had all under control. So back to the campsite I'd left earlier so I could set up my yard sale. A great friendship was formed!
 
scotttimm
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03/27/2018 11:29AM
Great thread.

On one of my first trips, was camping with my then-girlfriend now-wife on an island on Ensign, watched in bewilderment as an unoccupied aluminum canoe flew by down that long lake...and a minute later two guys, no lifejackets, swimming like nuts to catch it. We hopped in ours, caught up to the boat and returned it to them in the middle of the lake. They were out of breath, so we didn't ask questions!
Last year we were fortunate to be on the receiving end, a guy named Scott (Schmoe on the message board) who I met on Seagull Outfitters message board, mentioned he was planning on camping at the same site as us, leaving the day we arrived, and would leave my son and I a "little treasure map or maybe some scotch". When we got to Seagull Outfitters - a couple of the guys working there had the "treasure map" he left us, they...and we...thought it was the coolest thing ever. Schmoe had left us a laminated map with fishing spots and hints of treasures left behind on the island we planned to camp on. Super cool.
When we got to the island on Ogish, there were four young guys already there. We were bummed. I inquired from the water, "did you guys find my treasure?" DEAD SILENCE. "We drank it", they said. I explained the story, they apologized...said they were clearing out the next day. When we arrived the next day to the site, minutes before another group, they had left behind a couple of nice, fat, lovely cigars. We truly appreciated it and it made for a great memory as I smoked those stogies watching the moon and stars. Scott, wherever you are - thanks for the solid gift!
 
myceliaman
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03/28/2018 08:38PM
Mocha: "myceliaman: "A few years back we were fishing below the falls on Rose. It was getting windy and we could see canoes approaching. 2 couples paddled up to us, they had old heavy gear, aluminum canoes and looked like they'd been onthe loosing end of a whoopin. They were tired, and looking for a camp site. We helped them on the stairway portage and pointed them towards an open site. It was our last night and we typically have a fish dinner. We knew those folks were eating dehys because the one lady mentioned how much she was not enjoying the hard work , heavy gear and bad food. So we whipped them up some baked lake trout, spuds and a flask of gd bourbon and delivered dinner to their camp. I'll always remember the smiles on their faces and the grumpy lady teared up on us. They noticed the Rockwood Lodge logo on our canoe contacted and asked Mike if he knew who we were. A week later we got a package, with a bottle of Makers and a heart felt thank you. "


i like this one. so you also portaged their dinner and your canoes up stairway portage? that is wonderful."


We helped them on the portage and delivered them a freshly cooked dinner. Delivery in the bwca could be a great business..
 
rdricker
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03/28/2018 11:38PM
My first time in the Q, we were on a Northern Tier trek with the BSA. All female crew except for me. One of the taller ones, who probably outweighed me severely sprained what turned out to be four tendons in her ankle. Anyway, as luck would have it, we ran into the only other group of the trip on the very next portage....a family of four with their college age son. He carried her across that portage. I wound up carrying her over the remaining 5 of the trip, but it was nice to have the help on that one!
 
bobbernumber3
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03/29/2018 07:36AM
Leaving Hook Island at the start of a trip we noticed 2 fishing rods left behind by a group just ahead of us. We paddled 20 minutes behind them to the entrance of Cache Bay when they realized what they had left behind. They were just heading back to Hook Island when we pulled up with there fishing gear. They were relieved to find we had there missing rods!
 
bottomtothetap
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03/29/2018 11:36PM
Kindness trip report

My very first trip report highlights kindness we received from campcook184, pink canoe and others in their group. It was an awesome experience!
 
Pinetree
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09/23/2020 09:15AM
Sounds like the Kindness and positive vibes need to be expressed. I know its out there in many ways. Stories? Thanks?
 
JimmyJustice
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09/23/2020 10:43AM
In June at the end of a trip with my kids, we came out on Snowbank a few hours ahead of schedule for our pickup. Two other families were coming out the same time. One of the families who where using Spirit Outfitters offered to drop my teenage son off at VNO (across the street) so he could get our driver. Very nice of them. It saved us a few hours.
 
chessie
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09/26/2020 02:45PM
Great topic! This brings up so many fond memories of kind gestures, large and small, in the BW. I may have posted this before, but one that really stands out happened in Quetico in the mid-80s. I had undertaken a roughly 2 week trip w/ a college friend, heavy alum canoe and all. We did a loop out of Atikokan ... and toward the end had a lot of rain, cold, etc. Got pretty low on food. Second-to-last day on the water we were attempting to cross big Batchewaung Lake and got caught in high winds and rough water. Somehow we made it - then into Nym Lake and now it was not only ugly weather but near dark. We stopped at an island, and in spite of no trespassing signs, we were spent- & hoping to secure permission to pitch our wet tent for the night; we saw a dim light coming from a cabin. We knocked on the door, two greasy, soaked, tired river rats, and a voice from inside said "come in!" Trusting souls. Long and short of it is - these two gentlemen (Fa and son as I recall) opened up a cabin (which had been closed for season), let us shower while they made pizzas, fed us (including dessert), and put us up for the night, clean sheets and all! The next morning it was still windy as heck, so they threw our canoe and gear on their pontoon and shuttled us to the landing. We had nothing to offer them in return. Talk about the kindness of strangers! I only hope I have or will 'pay it forward'. All these years later, I can still visualize that cozy quintessential northwoods cabin, as we tentatively opened the door and entered, these 2 fellows sitting in their easy-chairs reading their respective newspapers. They scarcely looked up, as if they were expecting us.
 
Pinetree
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09/26/2020 05:28PM
Chessie

That is quite a helping hand. I always found the Canadians I met very helpful and friendly.

It would be hard if not impossible, but wouldn't it be something you could send them a note of appreciation now.
 
missmolly
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09/26/2020 05:45PM
Chessie, I too was saved by a Canadian. I was musky fishing a lake north of Lake of the Woods, staying at a resort. It had rained all day and my boat didn't have a bilge pump, so by day's end, it had settled pretty low. I fired up the engine, headed down the bay, and pulled the plug to drain it, but by the time I reached the main lake, I still had plenty of water aboard, so I aimed at another bay. When I reached it, my boat was drained and I figured I might as well make a few casts. It was choppy, gray, and raining, so the weather was perfect. A musky breached like my great, white whale and I was hooked. I kept casting and casting and the weather grew worse and the day darkened. Finally, I had to quit my mad quest to hook that great fish, so I fired up my engine again, motored about a hundred yards, and ran out of gas. Stupid, I know.

So, now it's dark and there's lightning coming and sooner or later, I'll be blown into an island or the shoreline and I might survive, but my boat my take a beating. So, I launch a flare, even though no one's out there, and wait. And soon I see a little light bobbing toward me and it's an old man who lives on the side of a cliff in a shack. He tows me to his old dock and we climb to his shack and he makes tea and we talk, waiting for the wind to lessen. Finally, we go back to his dock, he gives me some gas, and he leads me home in the middle of the night.

He had next to nothing, but he gave all he had.
 
bwcadan
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09/26/2020 09:04PM
I have carried a fair share of packs and canoes across on my return trip, otherwise empty handed. Now at the situation is reversed due to age and i appreciate the help. Most recently, 2 ladies carried the canoe and another item. From Stillwater, Mn. Thanks again.
 
09/27/2020 11:04AM
As noted in several earlier posts, I have also found Canadians to be kind and giving. They are generous with cold drinks on warm days and always provide news updates on what is currently happening in the states.
 
Pinetree
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09/27/2020 11:12AM
Love the comments of Kindness. A helping hand usually is paid forward with the receiver helping someone else. That is what I always tell someone many times they would want to give me something for helping them. I just say pass it on and help someone in the future.
 
airmorse
distinguished member(2722)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/27/2020 11:27AM
missmolly: "Chessie, I too was saved by a Canadian. I was musky fishing a lake north of Lake of the Woods, staying at a resort. It had rained all day and my boat didn't have a bilge pump, so by day's end, it had settled pretty low. I fired up the engine, headed down the bay, and pulled the plug to drain it, but by the time I reached the main lake, I still had plenty of water aboard, so I aimed at another bay. When I reached it, my boat was drained and I figured I might as well make a few casts. It was choppy, gray, and raining, so the weather was perfect. A musky breached like my great, white whale and I was hooked. I kept casting and casting and the weather grew worse and the day darkened. Finally, I had to quit my mad quest to hook that great fish, so I fired up my engine again, motored about a hundred yards, and ran out of gas. Stupid, I know.


So, now it's dark and there's lightning coming and sooner or later, I'll be blown into an island or the shoreline and I might survive, but my boat my take a beating. So, I launch a flare, even though no one's out there, and wait. And soon I see a little light bobbing toward me and it's an old man who lives on the side of a cliff in a shack. He tows me to his old dock and we climb to his shack and he makes tea and we talk, waiting for the wind to lessen. Finally, we go back to his dock, he gives me some gas, and he leads me home in the middle of the night.


He had next to nothing, but he gave all he had. "


Miss Molly=Captain Ahab.

"He piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart's shell upon it." 
 
bwcadan
distinguished member(1515)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/27/2020 02:36PM
Pinetree: "Love the comments of Kindness. A helping hand usually is paid forward with the receiver helping someone else. That is what I always tell someone many times they would want to give me something for helping them. I just say pass it on and help someone in the future."

BIG PLUS ONE
 
GraniteCliffs
distinguished member(1859)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/27/2020 03:52PM
I have canoed with the same three guys for the past 15-20 years. They are old coworkers that are 15-22 years younger than me.
I always portaged a canoe and pack. About five years ago my pack became much, much lighter after they had packed it. Last year I portaged the canoe and a PFD. Again, due to their packing. On a couple of the very long portages someone actually walked back after finishing the portage to check on me.
They never complain. They just tell me to take my time.
A very kind group of friends.
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6957)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
09/27/2020 04:39PM
airmorse: "missmolly: "Chessie, I too was saved by a Canadian. I was musky fishing a lake north of Lake of the Woods, staying at a resort. It had rained all day and my boat didn't have a bilge pump, so by day's end, it had settled pretty low. I fired up the engine, headed down the bay, and pulled the plug to drain it, but by the time I reached the main lake, I still had plenty of water aboard, so I aimed at another bay. When I reached it, my boat was drained and I figured I might as well make a few casts. It was choppy, gray, and raining, so the weather was perfect. A musky breached like my great, white whale and I was hooked. I kept casting and casting and the weather grew worse and the day darkened. Finally, I had to quit my mad quest to hook that great fish, so I fired up my engine again, motored about a hundred yards, and ran out of gas. Stupid, I know.



So, now it's dark and there's lightning coming and sooner or later, I'll be blown into an island or the shoreline and I might survive, but my boat my take a beating. So, I launch a flare, even though no one's out there, and wait. And soon I see a little light bobbing toward me and it's an old man who lives on the side of a cliff in a shack. He tows me to his old dock and we climb to his shack and he makes tea and we talk, waiting for the wind to lessen. Finally, we go back to his dock, he gives me some gas, and he leads me home in the middle of the night.



He had next to nothing, but he gave all he had. "



Miss Molly=Captain Ahab.


"He piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart's shell upon it." 
"


Gosh, I wish I could have jumped on its great, white back, but I would have hugged it rather than hated it.
 
jillpine
distinguished member(521)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/27/2020 05:25PM
missmolly: "


He had next to nothing, but he gave all he had. "


Those are always the ones who give the most, from Mary M. right on down.

What a terrific story!
 
09/27/2020 07:49PM
bwcadan: "I have carried a fair share of packs and canoes across on my return trip, otherwise empty handed. Now at the situation is reversed due to age and i appreciate the help. Most recently, 2 ladies carried the canoe and another item. From Stillwater, Mn. Thanks again."



Wow, portages your stuff all the way from Stillwater. That’s quite a portage! :)
 
chessie
distinguished member (134)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/28/2020 08:12PM
PineTree, I hope I did thank them properly all those years ago. I have tried to figure out how to see if they are still around now> I don't even know the name of their outfit. I do recall that one of them, maybe the dad, played football for Canada, maybe pro? Somewhere I probably have a journal of that trip.... !
 
Pinetree
distinguished member(12797)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
09/28/2020 08:17PM
chessie: "PineTree, I hope I did thank them properly all those years ago. I have tried to figure out how to see if they are still around now> I don't even know the name of their outfit. I do recall that one of them, maybe the dad, played football for Canada, maybe pro? Somewhere I probably have a journal of that trip.... !"

I am sure you did the day they helped you out.
 
TuscaroraBorealis
distinguished member(4683)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/04/2020 10:19AM
I was on my first solo in over a decade and, had endured nearly a week straight of cold and rainy weather. My countenance was plummeting after waking to yet another disagreeably cold/rainy morning on Boulder Lake. As I busied myself tearing down camp, a canoe was drawn close to my site after noticing the BWCA.COM sticker on the Black Pearl and called from out on the lake.

It turns out it was fellow bwca.com'er Ghamer. We proceeded to have a nice conversation, and while we didn't discuss anything particularly profound; just the short talk we had was quite the uplifting experience and really rejuvenated me when my spirits had been down.

When seeing others I always try to simply give a smile or wave when I see them out and about. Hopefully, even these simple gestures will help brighten their day.

 
10/04/2020 01:01PM
nctry: "bwcadan: "I have carried a fair share of packs and canoes across on my return trip, otherwise empty handed. Now at the situation is reversed due to age and i appreciate the help. Most recently, 2 ladies carried the canoe and another item. From Stillwater, Mn. Thanks again."




Wow, portages your stuff all the way from Stillwater. That’s quite a portage! :)"


Good one! 'I just flew in from Vegas, and man, are my arms tired!'
 
HangLoose
distinguished member(798)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/04/2020 08:45PM
One kind camper left me thousands of pistachio shells randomly spread around the campsite as a sort of welcome matt for me. I believe that same camper left his partially burnt tighty whities on the fire grate as a little token of love. It is these random acts of kindness that really warm my heart as I travel the BWCAW.
 
colddriver
member (12)member
 
10/04/2020 09:19PM
We would do a family trip every year when we were all younger.
As we got older sometimes one of the kids would have to stay home for other obligations and such, well it happens to be me that had to stay home that year. We would always use Cliff wolds outfitting, my dad and cliff would sit and drink coffee like it was gonna never be around anymore lol... But any ways a few days into there trip I received a call that my uncle(dad's brother) had a heart attack and passed away.
Being my dad's only brother I knew I had to do something.
Thought about driving the 12hrs and looking for them,
I called Cliff wolds and told them my deliema, asking how I can get a reservation and equipment ready as I would be there in 12 hrs to search knife lake for my family.
After the phone call with them, I started to gather my things and pack the car when I got a call back from Cliff himself sayimg he sent out a few of his employees to look for my family and guaranteed they would find them. And find them they did, not only did they find my family they said to just get in the canoe and go, two of the employees stayed at the camp and broke everything down and packed it up and the other two employees helped my family back cross all of the portage's. WOW!!
My hats of to cliff and to the employees who helped complete strangers in a time of need. I never got to shake Cliffs hand and personally thank him for what he did but I will never ever forget MR.Cliff Wold may he RIP!
Jay
 
Pinetree
distinguished member(12797)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
10/04/2020 10:15PM
colddriver: "We would do a family trip every year when we were all younger.
As we got older sometimes one of the kids would have to stay home for other obligations and such, well it happens to be me that had to stay home that year. We would always use Cliff wolds outfitting, my dad and cliff would sit and drink coffee like it was gonna never be around anymore lol... But any ways a few days into there trip I received a call that my uncle(dad's brother) had a heart attack and passed away.
Being my dad's only brother I knew I had to do something.
Thought about driving the 12hrs and looking for them,
I called Cliff wolds and told them my deliema, asking how I can get a reservation and equipment ready as I would be there in 12 hrs to search knife lake for my family.
After the phone call with them, I started to gather my things and pack the car when I got a call back from Cliff himself sayimg he sent out a few of his employees to look for my family and guaranteed they would find them. And find them they did, not only did they find my family they said to just get in the canoe and go, two of the employees stayed at the camp and broke everything down and packed it up and the other two employees helped my family back cross all of the portage's. WOW!!
My hats of to cliff and to the employees who helped complete strangers in a time of need. I never got to shake Cliffs hand and personally thank him for what he did but I will never ever forget MR.Cliff Wold may he RIP!
Jay"


Cliff Wold was kind of a legend up there.
 
colddriver
member (12)member
 
10/05/2020 06:43AM
He definitely is in my book and probably my dads.


 
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