Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Gear Forum
      Wenonah Rendezvous     

Author

Text

RoundRiver
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/07/2018 10:58PM  
Hi. Does anyone have information and specifications on the Wenonah Rendezvous - I cannot find these anywhere? Does anyone have opinions about it as a river tripping boat and/or an all-purpose tripping boat? I am looking for an all-purpose tripping boat that can handle smaller rivers and an occasional class 1 or 2 rapid.
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
justpaddlin
distinguished member (370)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/08/2018 09:09AM  
I had a Royalex Rendezvous and my friend had a composite one. From memory it's 15'8" long and has 2 inches of rocker both front and rear. It's a deep boat...14 inches center depth if I recall. The Royalex boat was known to have scary handing and I think there is a fix where you add a longer front thwart. The composite boat paddles more efficiently than the Royalex one.

Rendezvous is quite a unique boat. It's light on the water. It's quick and quite fast...especially for a river boat with symmetric rocker. It is extremely maneuverable and turns sharply with just a slight lean. It's quite trim sensitive. My Royalex boat was uncontrollable with a dog in front of me. The composite boat is less sensitive but still prefers to have the load behind the paddler rather than in front (or it gets tail happy).

A Rendezvous would work just fine for your planned use. There are lots of other solos that would,also handle your needs well.
 
10/08/2018 07:58PM  

Here you go Mike!

Specs and graphics below are from a 2006 Wenonah catalog.

As justpaddlin mentioned, it would certainly work well for your intended use. It's a rather big and deep solo canoe, which is great if you need or want cargo capacity.

I purchased a used Royalex Rendezvous several years ago that was in very good condition and at a great price. Unfortunately I haven't had a chance to use it as often as I'd like.

I acquired my Rendezvous for canoe-tripping on northern Wisconsin rivers, such as the Namekagon, St. Croix, Flambeau River(s), etc., or other similar rivers that might too abusive for a composite solo canoe.

In my opinion, it's well suited for other similar type rivers that have intermittent sections of non-technical whitewater, yet also have several miles of flat water between the sets of rapids. In my opinion, it works well for my intended purposes, especially if you intend to travel for several days with gear.

Hans Solo

 
RoundRiver
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 08:58PM  
Thanks guys. Good input. I figured I would hear from you Hans, and knew if anyone had input from an old catalog, it would be you. Thanks for sharing.

I am not sure this boat is sufficiently different from my NC Pal to warrant buying. I am still considering either a Northstar Phoenix or Swift Prospector 14 as the front-runners for my all-purpose canoe. We will see.
 
JATFOMike
distinguished member (331)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/10/2018 07:45AM  
One of my buddies picked up a used royalex wilderness and I hope to paddle it this weekend on a local river overnighter we are doing. I currently have a Phoenix in their IXP layup and absolutely love it! More than capable of class I/II and I recently used it on a weeklong BWCA trip. Not the ideal boat for that, but worked just fine.....plenty of cargo capacity. You've probably already seen it, but in case you haven't, there is a review by Cliff Jacobson on his website and a link to it on the Northstar website about the Phoenix.....

Mike
 
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5366)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/10/2018 10:50AM  
I would emphasize this more so than any other boat I've paddled, but paddle it before you buy it. There are a lot of fans out there, but "Squirrely" would be my best description. The friend who owned it had a royalex model and had made the recommended change in the thwart. But gosh, my much smaller mad river Indy wasn't as "Trim sensitive" as the Rendezvous. I admit, my observation was just from one paddle, but I just could find nothing I liked about it. Seemed deeper than boats I've paddled that were deeper than the Rendezvous? And to me, it didn't track NOR turn well? Now how is THAT possible? Lastly, stability was just all over the place for me. It felt like a wild horse just waiting for an opportunity to throw me!
 
RoundRiver
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 12:36AM  
Thank you Ozark and JATFOMike. Glad to hear real-life reports on the Phoenix, and its versatility. I have seen Cliff's review several times. I know it won't be considered "ideal" for the BWCAW, but I like the river segments (Frost, Kawishiwi out of Kawishiwi Lake, Louse, Horse, Little Indian Sioux, Chub, Phoebe, and all the little stream linkages). I do potentially see using the Phoenix occasionally in lower/class I/II whitewater. I often paddle with a double bladed paddle across larger lakes, which should help me track straighter - any thoughts on that?

I have learned over time there is no one boat that is ideal for a mixture of uses and I think the Phoenix or Swift Prospector 14 will be most "ideal" for the mixture of uses (even within a trip) I enjoy - and better for this than my CJ Solo.
The CJ Solo is a great lake canoe that is quite fast and holds a good amount of gear, but simply does not have much rocker. I was considering the Wilderness (tested one and really liked it), but the rocker is lower than I want and did not see it being a significantly better boat than the CJ Solo.
 
10/13/2018 02:49PM  

ozarkpaddler: "I would emphasize this more so than any other boat I've paddled, but paddle it before you buy it. There are a lot of fans out there, but "Squirrely" would be my best description. The friend who owned it had a Royalex model and had made the recommended change in the thwart. But gosh, my much smaller mad river Indy wasn't as "Trim sensitive" as the Rendezvous. I admit, my observation was just from one paddle, but I just could find nothing I liked about it. Seemed deeper than boats I've paddled that were deeper than the Rendezvous? And to me, it didn't track NOR turn well? Now how is THAT possible? Lastly, stability was just all over the place for me. It felt like a wild horse just waiting for an opportunity to throw me!"

Wow Terry, definitely not what I'd call a ringing endorsement! :-)

You didn't mention if the Rendezvous you paddled was loaded or unloaded, but I'm guessing it was without a load? It does react much differently when loaded properly.

I do admit the Rendezvous is trim sensitive, but I have had had, or currently have, other solo canoes that are more trim sensitive than the Rendezvous. My Wenonah Jensen C1W is even more sensitive to trim than the Rendezvous.

Although I'm aware of the thwart modification, I can't say I have needed to apply it. That's primarily because that was more of an issue with some of the earlier Royalex Rendezvous solos produced in the early 2000's where the thwart placement(s) were off when they left the factory.

Hans Solo

 
10/14/2018 05:09PM  
I kinda messed with one at spring Creek a few years ago. I liked it well loaded, but not sure my "load" was a good representative. I personally like the Wilderness better.
 
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5366)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 12:04PM  
HansSolo: "
ozarkpaddler: "I would emphasize this more so than any other boat I've paddled, but paddle it before you buy it. There are a lot of fans out there, but "Squirrely" would be my best description. The friend who owned it had a Royalex model and had made the recommended change in the thwart. But gosh, my much smaller mad river Indy wasn't as "Trim sensitive" as the Rendezvous. I admit, my observation was just from one paddle, but I just could find nothing I liked about it. Seemed deeper than boats I've paddled that were deeper than the Rendezvous? And to me, it didn't track NOR turn well? Now how is THAT possible? Lastly, stability was just all over the place for me. It felt like a wild horse just waiting for an opportunity to throw me!"

Wow Terry, definitely not what I'd call a ringing endorsement! :-)

You didn't mention if the Rendezvous you paddled was loaded or unloaded, but I'm guessing it was without a load? It does react much differently when loaded properly.

I do admit the Rendezvous is trim sensitive, but I have had had, or currently have, other solo canoes that are more trim sensitive than the Rendezvous. My Wenonah Jensen C1W is even more sensitive to trim than the Rendezvous.

Although I'm aware of the thwart modification, I can't say I have needed to apply it. That's primarily because that was more of an issue with some of the earlier Royalex Rendezvous solos produced in the early 2000's where the thwart placement(s) were off when they left the factory.

Hans Solo


"






Heheheh, you know, you made me think about my comments. ONE paddle with an empty (except an XL paddler) does not make for an accurate assessment. So I need to stress to the OP that it was just ONE PADDLE. But, I disliked the boat so much, I'd have never paddled it a 2nd time (LOL)!

Different strokes, 'eh? Only 3 boats I've paddled that I felt so strongly about disliking, the 'Vous, Wenonah Argosy, and composite Nova Craft Supernova (Interestingly enough, I really liked the royalex Supernova, though).
 
justpaddlin
distinguished member (370)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/16/2018 03:18PM  
I sold my Rendezvous and also passed on my friend's lightweight Kevlar version that I could have picked up at a great price so I do agree about the cautions raised. I would never pay new boat prices for one with so many other fine choices out there. The Argosy and Rendezvous are similar in that they both cruise fast for their class...they hum along and have some Wenonah in them. Both will run away from a Phoenix on flat water. And if you lean a Rendezvous or Argosy a little bit they turn really well, and if you lean them a lot they will scare the crap out of you and maybe even spit you out...but turn sharply if you stay dry. The Rendezvous is even scarier than the Argosy if you try to put the gunnel to the water. So maybe they work well for sitters. I am a kneeler. I think their flatwater cruising is their unique strength given that both are river boats.
 
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5366)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 03:38PM  
justpaddlin: " So maybe they work well for sitters. I am a kneeler. I think their flatwater cruising is their unique strength given that both are river boats."

You know, as a fellow "Kneeler," it makes sense. I too kneel and enjoy a boat that I can lean to the gunwale as I'm turning or playing around. Lean it past the "Bubble" in the Wenonah Argosy and Rendezvous and at the least it will scare the crap out of you. Paddlers whom sit, may find the hull a more comfortable ride? Here's a pic of what I mean about that "Bubble" in the Argosy and Rendezvous.

 
59kanu
member (5)member
 
11/12/2020 02:20PM  



 
59kanu
member (5)member
 
11/12/2020 02:20PM  


 
59kanu
member (5)member
 
11/12/2020 02:20PM  


 
59kanu
member (5)member
 
11/12/2020 02:20PM  



 
59kanu
member (5)member
 
11/12/2020 02:20PM  
Old post, I know, but I've come across some Rendezvous lore that doesn't seem to be widely known. From conversations with Jerry Nyre at Canoe Colorado and Susan at Wenonah, I've learned some history and yet another set of specs for this boat.
The original version of the Rendezvous was designed by Jerry Nyre and manufactured by Wenonah from 1988-92. It had a bow height of 18", center of 13" and stern 16" and was built with Wenonah's center-rib construction.
Starting in 1990 a deeper version (19-14-17), redesigned by Dave Kruger, was made available, also in composite layups only. Apparently this version was the same below the waterline as the original. After 1992 this deeper version became the only choice in composite layups. The Royalex version, deeper still and with a more raked bow, came along later.
I have a 1990 model in the original, shallower version. Mine is Tuf-weave and the listed weight is 48 lbs. It mostly stays on my roof rack as my daily paddler. I use it on tidal rivers, Puget Sound, class 2 rivers on the Olympic Peninsula and lakes. It's very versatile. Fast, maneuverable and seaworthy, it's low-slung enough to be pretty well-behaved in the wind and it will carry more than you need. Mine has the narrow Kevlar sliding seat, which I can kneel around easily though it's rarely necessary. It's round-bottomed so the primary stability is a little loose but the secondary is fine. The only time I've dumped it is when launching through the surf, which has more to do with my technique than the boat.

 
Stevador
 
11/17/2020 08:14AM  
Can you tell about this changing the length of the front thwart on a Wenonah rendezvous? You have me curious about this since I have an opportunity to get one. Thanks- steve
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next