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Zwater
distinguished member (374)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/10/2019 10:41PM
I went through 4 interviews with this upcoming job. I received the postion. Now they are doing background checks on my previous job salary, and now say I was deceiving about my previous salary. It was a gap job as a Process Engineer that I only worked at for around 4 months. My previous boss will go to bat for me. Any advice? Thank you!
 
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cyclones30
distinguished member(1633)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/10/2019 11:08PM
Who cares what your salary was at an earlier job?
 
Zwater
distinguished member (374)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/10/2019 11:15PM
That's what I thought.
 
Canoearoo
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01/11/2019 12:16AM
So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt.
 
GeoFisher
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01/11/2019 12:31AM
Zwater: "That's what I thought. "

Salary is a private matter between you and your employee. If you told them 100k and they paid you 120k but you really only made 50k, THEY obviously thought you were worth the 120k before they offered it.

If anything comes of this and you don't get the job, you should SPEW vitriol about this employer, because they SUCK.

 
GeoFisher
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01/11/2019 12:33AM
Canoearoo: "So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt. "


I wouldn't ......I run away........AS FAST AS I could. They don't deserve my skills, my ability, my expertise in ANYTHING.
 
Canoearoo
distinguished member(2164)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 01:16AM
If he has the money to do that then I agree. But if you need a job till you find a new one or if it is a dream job just being mucked up by bad hr then hang on a little bit. But to be called a liar is a big deal to me.
 
Guest Paddler
 
01/11/2019 02:57AM
Canoearoo: "So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt. "

It sounds like Zwater is saying that he lied about his previous salary. If I found out that someone had lied to me during their application process I’d fire them. I don’t want people working for me that cannot be honest with me.
 
01/11/2019 03:52AM
Use that previous employer! Clear up whatever you need to clear up. If they’ll go to bat for you, use them!
 
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(1078)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 07:44AM
I don't think a previous employer can disclose your salary to a new employer by law. They can hardly provide a reference or review, only that you were employed and the dates.
 
bwcadan
distinguished member(1254)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 09:14AM
It should be easy to prove your income to the new employer. Just dig out tax records and show them exactly what you earned for the last several years. If you really want the job, and what they are telling you about the reasons for not offering to take you on, this should clear up the problem without involving your former employer.
 
nofish
distinguished member(2844)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 10:15AM
I have done A LOT of job interviews and I have never been asked about my previous salary. Frankly what I made at a previous job is irrelevant to what I should be making at the new job. The salary for a position should be based on the responsibilities of that job, what experience the candidate brings, what value the job and candidate bring to the company, and then it should also be based on what similar jobs might pay in similar sized companies within the same industry.

Frankly Im surprised your former company would even say anything to the new company other then to confirm dates of employment. Legally they are allowed to disclose whatever they want as long as its factual and accurate but most employers steer clear of anything beyond dates of employment so that there is no chance of a lawsuit.

To me this is all a big red flag from this new company. I wouldn't necessarily reject the offer immediately but it would at least have me thinking.

I think its completely fair to explain yourself to the new company but then say you feel your salary should be based on the position you are being hired for and the skills and experience you bring not what another company thought your former job was worth. If they can't agree then tell them to pound sand.
 
HowardSprague
distinguished member(3062)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 10:27AM
What nofish and GeoFisher said is right on! The best policy, imho, when they ask for "previous salary" - which is NONE of their business - is to answer "My compensation requirement range is $______- _______".
In some states, they have made it illegal for recruiters to ask for your salary history. The only reason they insist on this is so they can potentially get someone who is worth, say, $100K but has been working - for whatever reason - for $60K - to work for them for $65K.

I know, online applications often don't let you fill it out without populating a "current salary" field. either fill that out with $0, or fill it out with your target salary and later in the free-form section indicate "salaries given indicate current requirement" or something like that. If they're really stubborn about it - yeah, big red flag.

"So, what are you making now?"
 
HowardSprague
distinguished member(3062)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 10:41AM
: "Canoearoo: "So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt. "

It sounds like Zwater is saying that he lied about his previous salary. If I found out that someone had lied to me during their application process I’d fire them. I don’t want people working for me that cannot be honest with me."


Would that work both ways? "What is the salary budget for this position?" "What did the previous person in this position get paid?" Do you think the employer would be honest in answering these questions? Fat chance!
That company has no more business knowing what Zwater makes than they do knowing if he ever had a genital fungus.


States banning asking salary history
 
Guest Paddler
 
01/11/2019 07:59PM
HowardSprague: ": "Canoearoo: "So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt. "

It sounds like Zwater is saying that he lied about his previous salary. If I found out that someone had lied to me during their application process I’d fire them. I don’t want people working for me that cannot be honest with me."



Would that work both ways? "What is the salary budget for this position?" "What did the previous person in this position get paid?" Do you think the employer would be honest in answering these questions? Fat chance!
That company has no more business knowing what Zwater makes than they do knowing if he ever had a genital fungus.



States banning asking salary history "


I agree that his previous salary isn’t anybody’s business but honesty is just something I expect from people close to me and people I work with. I dislike deceptive people. Much prefer honest folks with a backbone.
 
sns
distinguished member (235)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 11:05PM
Hopefully you get the backup you need to support your position.

Agree with what others have said...a whiff of dishonesty is the kiss of death.

Fun story from many, many years ago.
CEO creates a new technical leader role. Needs some very, very specific lab testing knowledge - super hard to find. Months later, a miracle - qualified candidate is found who actually wrote the certification exams for this technical discipline - expert of experts.
Final interview is a mere formality...fly in on a Saturday, meet the CEO at the airport, have lunch and get the offer in writing.
CEO goes to the airport...no candidate. Mad scramble to find candidate. Nothing for hours.
Finally, he surfaces! "My flight got delayed, then cancelled due to weather. Can be on next flight out - please advise." I tell CEO same. CEO says "OK - but give me a few minutes." CEO calls airline.
Flight was not delayed. Flight was not cancelled.
Offer pulled.
The quote from the CEO, which I've never forgotten:
"He could have told me that he woke up in a brothel with a needle sticking out of his arm, and I would have still hired him. But he lied."
 
sns
distinguished member (235)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/11/2019 11:26PM
So I have interviewed many folks. Like probably close to 10,000. Asked every single one what they currently make, because we don't want egg on our face making an offer that is too low. Can't recall anyone ever refusing to share this info outright.

I do understand the argument that the job should pay what the skills required warrant, and I think there is real merit to it, but it's also easy to see candidates and companies both wasting effort, getting all the way to the end and then having an inappropriate offer made.

That said, the winds are blowing that way, and I am actually looking forward to not asking - I do expect that most states will eventually prohibit the question.

You would still be able to volunteer this info, and many people definitely would do so early in the process in order to avoid wasting time if the budget for the role isn't enough. I'd say 1 in 4 candidates volunteer this info up front as it is today.

Zwater, feel free to reach out to me privately if you'd like to discuss. I am not a lawyer, but again, this is kind of my area.
 
OCDave
distinguished member (362)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/12/2019 12:34AM
Zwater: "I went through 4 interviews with this upcoming job. I received the postion. Now they are doing background checks on my previous job salary, and now say I was deceiving about my previous salary. It was a gap job as a Process Engineer that I only worked at for around 4 months. My previous boss will go to bat for me. Any advice? Thank you!"

Are they trying to recind the offer of employment or just renegotiate the salary?
 
01/12/2019 03:58AM
: "HowardSprague: ": "Canoearoo: "So they are calling you a liar? That's not ok in my book. I would defend yourself If you like this new job. Ask for proof from your old job that you are telling the truth.
Hopefully they are just misunderstanding and not judging your character. If it were me I would be offended. But if it were a job I liked I would give them the benefit of the doubt. "

It sounds like Zwater is saying that he lied about his previous salary. If I found out that someone had lied to me during their application process I’d fire them. I don’t want people working for me that cannot be honest with me."




Would that work both ways? "What is the salary budget for this position?" "What did the previous person in this position get paid?" Do you think the employer would be honest in answering these questions? Fat chance!
That company has no more business knowing what Zwater makes than they do knowing if he ever had a genital fungus.



States banning asking salary history "



I agree that his previous salary isn’t anybody’s business but honesty is just something I expect from people close to me and people I work with. I dislike deceptive people. Much prefer honest folks with a backbone."




Your assumption is he lied. Mine is there is a misunderstanding... I say utilize your previous boss that will bat for him and go from there.
 
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(1078)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/12/2019 06:59AM
nctry:Your assumption is he lied. Mine is there is a misunderstanding... I say utilize your previous boss that will bat for him and go from there. "

Maybe he lied. Maybe he didn't. We don't know
We may never know. It's no big deal, trust me. I know. Overblown. So sad.
 
yellowhorse
senior member (68)senior membersenior member
 
01/12/2019 07:55AM
Zwater: "I went through 4 interviews with this upcoming job. I received the postion. Now they are doing background checks on my previous job salary, and now say I was deceiving about my previous salary. It was a gap job as a Process Engineer that I only worked at for around 4 months. My previous boss will go to bat for me. Any advice? Thank you!"

Were you deceiving about your previous salary?
 
Captn Tony
distinguished member(1344)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/12/2019 08:12AM
2X post
 
Captn Tony
distinguished member(1344)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/12/2019 08:12AM
Why I interviewed job applicants, 4 things mattered.
1. Are you qualified?
2. Do you have the right attitude
3. Can we work together as a team?
4. If 1-3 look good, what is it going to take to get you to work for me?
Most other questions are strictly B.S. including what was your previous salary. The only wage question that should matter to the interviewer is how many $ is it going to take to get to you to work for me and is there another similar candidate for less $.
Things to think about
1. You are also interviewing them to see if you want to work for them.
2. If you want the job prove your point and get on with the offer.
3. If you're seeing other red flags in the interview keep looking.
4. In this case keep looking in case this doesn't work out.
 
thegildedgopher
distinguished member (306)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/12/2019 12:53PM
I refuse to interview for any position that will not give at least a salary range up front. Why should employees be asked to state their salary requirements or divulge current/past salaries, if the company isn’t willing to be forthright about their valuation of this position? No thanks!

I work for a large university and all employees have access to a database showing salary info for everyone who works there. So when a job is posted I can find out who currently or recently held it, and look up their salary as a point of reference. I can also see salaries of all current university employees in any specific job classification, which is amazing.

I realize this level of transparency isn’t common. It’s probably turned me off from the public sector for good to be honest.
 
01/12/2019 05:27PM
Advice?

I think it depends. If you think this is a really good position and really want this job or maybe simply you need this job then I’d try to clear this up.


If you already had a good job, I’d move on.

T
 
jhb8426
distinguished member(812)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2019 12:54AM
bobbernumber3: "I don't think a previous employer can disclose your salary to a new employer by law. They can hardly provide a reference or review, only that you were employed and the dates."

Ummm, no. The reason they prefer to answer with only a "yes, he worked here" and the dates is a CYA issue. There's no other legal reason to withhold information. That said, and individual is free to provide any info he/she deems appropriate depending on the situation. I've give references for many previous employees.
 
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(1078)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2019 07:16AM
jhb8426: "bobbernumber3: "I don't think a previous employer can disclose your salary to a new employer by law. They can hardly provide a reference or review, only that you were employed and the dates."


Ummm, no. The reason they prefer to answer with only a "yes, he worked here" and the dates is a CYA issue. There's no other legal reason to withhold information. That said, and individual is free to provide any info he/she deems appropriate depending on the situation. I've give references for many previous employees."


Yeah... I think you are right on CYA. It was a company policy I recall from HR training.
 
Basspro69
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01/13/2019 11:42AM
As an employer the only thing they should be concerned with is your experience, sounds almost as if they had someone else in mind and are trying to rail road you .
 
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1718)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2019 11:01AM
timatkn: "Advice?


I think it depends. If you think this is a really good position and really want this job or maybe simply you need this job then I’d try to clear this up.



If you already had a good job, I’d move on.


T"

+1
Proceed with caution
 
salukiguy
distinguished member(505)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2019 01:21PM
As dumb as it sounds I don't always remember or know my exact salary from a previous job. Maybe I was making $52,865 but I put $50,000 as my approximate previous salary. Maybe I got a incremental bonus the previous year and it bumped my salary above my base. Maybe I worked a little overtime or there were some perks like phone compensation or perdiem. Just saying sometimes its harder than you think to come up with exact salary.
 
nofish
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01/14/2019 02:24PM
jhb8426: "bobbernumber3: "I don't think a previous employer can disclose your salary to a new employer by law. They can hardly provide a reference or review, only that you were employed and the dates."


Ummm, no. The reason they prefer to answer with only a "yes, he worked here" and the dates is a CYA issue. There's no other legal reason to withhold information. That said, and individual is free to provide any info he/she deems appropriate depending on the situation. I've give references for many previous employees."


Exactly. In some states employers are legally not allowed to disclose salary but its a state by state issue with no federal law prohibiting it. In most states an employer can divulge a previous salary along with anything that is factual and accurate. The reason most won't say anything beyond dates of employment is because "factual and accurate" often times can be argued as matter of opinion and employers are eager to avoid anything that can end up as a messy legal matter. In reality for the former employer they have no more skin in the game and nothing to gain from giving out information about a former employee so its not worth the risk.
 
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