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      How many still using vintage gear?     

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CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/29/2019 03:55PM
I restore old lanterns and stoves as a hobby, and recently restored a Coleman 222A single mantle 'backpacking' lantern that, while small, for today's ultralight hikers would be like dragging an anchor along; also renovated a Svea 123R stove that is smaller than my peak one stove and about as bulky as my butane tank stove, and has me tempted to take that on hiking and kayaking overnighters.
So I'm curious how many out there are still using vintage stuff whether due to lack of budget or personal preference?
 
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Grandma L
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12/29/2019 05:46PM
Yup, all the time but, have replaced most gear with ultra light newer things and use the
"heavy" stuff at the cabin or car camping or have given it to the kids who don't mine it being a little heavy.
 
Grandma L
distinguished member(5369)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
12/29/2019 05:48PM
I did have Butthead refurbish several Coleman duel fuel stoves for me a few years back. He is a genius at it.
 
alpinebrule
distinguished member (215)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2019 07:20PM
Still find my circa 1975 Coleman 222 unsurpassed when I decide to carry a lantern. Burns forever on a fill and like the way it gives a bit of burn time after shutting it off. Mixed with a Optimus 8R, for long burn time meals, of the same vintage both still going strong. BWCA only not back packing.
 
CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/29/2019 07:58PM
Do you use a case for the lantern? I have one but it's bulky.
 
MossBack
member (41)member
 
12/29/2019 08:54PM
Still using the same REI Nalgene bottle and dry bag from the late 1970's. Nearly everything has been upgraded. Hoping someday a tent manufacturer will use zippers that will survive more than a coupe of summers..

 
Northwoodsman
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12/29/2019 09:30PM
I have some Duluth Packs from the 70's or 80's. I have used them a few times in recent years. My CCS packs are way more comfortable.

Not to hijack the OP, but the question I have for the group is... If you still have vintage equipment, for nostalgic reasons would you ever consider a trip using only technology from a vintage era? Perhaps to retrace a trip you took back in the day.

For me the answer is easy, "No way"!
 
jwartman59
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12/29/2019 09:36PM

The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975.
 
GraniteCliffs
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12/29/2019 10:50PM
I still use a Duluth Pack that the company estimated was made in 1948-1950. Still works the same but brought it in to have a hole patched.
 
GraniteCliffs
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12/29/2019 10:53PM
I also use a sleeping bag made my EMS that I bought in 1973. It has been around the world once and on several other overseas trips. Love that bag.

Also take a small coffee pot I use to heat water on most every trip. I bought that in the mid-seventies.

And then, of course, I, myself, am vintage gear...........................
 
RunningFox
senior member (57)senior membersenior member
 
12/29/2019 11:17PM
I still use a Duluth pack from the late 60s, a Boy Scout hatchet made by Plumb — I would guess it comes from the 60s, and a space blanket from the 1970s. All are hand-me-downs that I cherish.

Sorry to say I haven’t used either of my two Grumman 17ft canoes for a few years now. Maybe it’s time to part ways with the standard weight model.
 
Jaywalker
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12/29/2019 11:27PM
What’s your idea of vintage? My 15 year old nephew thinks my iPhone 5 qualifies.
 
WoollyBear
member (16)member
 
12/30/2019 12:30AM
I have a Hudson Bay pack from the mid-80s that I used until last year. I bought CCS Pioneer (and Explorer packs) and after one trip decided the Hudson Bay shall be retired.
 
alpinebrule
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12/30/2019 08:54AM
Response to Coyotakid's question.
For years I didn't only a padded sack but found a Tupperware container, lid on top, that fits it in the bag snuggly. Doesn't make it that much bulkier and much smaller than the one you probably have. Not sure what its original intended purpose was.
 
RTurner
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12/30/2019 09:01AM
jwartman59: " The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975."
That boat looks pretty vintage, too.
 
ZaraSp00k
distinguished member(1483)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/30/2019 09:22AM
Duluth pack, and a stove, burner actually that screws into a propane tank
if on a 4 person trip and nobody else supplies a tent I'll use my Timberline 4
do two Wenonah canoes from the late 80's, made of Tuffweave qualify as vintage?
also my winter pack that was made to carry skis or snow shoes, whichever aren't being used at the time, wish I could find another like it, has two ample side pockets and a large main pocket for sleeping bag
 
ThreeRivers
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
 
12/30/2019 10:14AM
I use my grandfathers mini pocket knife from 1948, my fathers spinning rod from 1982, and the the item that has seen the most wear and tear is my spine! circa 1971!
 
bwcadan
distinguished member(1464)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/30/2019 10:21AM
I still take and use my uncle's WW2 duffle bag. It has seen better days, but I expect it to last longer than I do. Time will tell. I always think of this uncle and his service in the Pacific Theatre when using this pack.
 
12/30/2019 10:28AM
Northwoodsman: "Not to hijack the OP, but the question I have for the group is... If you still have vintage equipment, for nostalgic reasons would you ever consider a trip using only technology from a vintage era? Perhaps to retrace a trip you took back in the day.

For me the answer is easy, "No way"!"

I will be taking an old hatchet this year. It has a cherry handle and a heavy head. This was passed down to my Dad sometime in the 60's by his uncle. My Dad never used it and gave it to me in the 70's and I can't remember ever using it either. So I got it sharpened up and oiled the handle and will give it a go. It's solid, that's for sure.

To answer Northwoodsman question - I really want to do a trip like I did in the 80's. Not so much the gear but the lack of electronics. No camera, no radio, no plb. Just a couple of books and minimal gear on a solo. The camera and radio can be very nice distractions on a solo but I think you experience the woods better without them.
 
CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/30/2019 12:07PM
Interesting responses!
I guess I consider vintage as anything that is older than the current century, and has since been updated with 'newer' technology.
I myself went from naïve novice trekker (cotton jeans and t-shirts, low budget, high bulk and weight items) to less gear, then less, then even less. During the trips I thought a great deal about items that are 'functionally redundant', i.e., many uses, like a heavy trash bag that can have many uses for the weight and bulk. Every year I kept a journal and one topic was gear: what worked well; what I should have brought; and what I need to leave behind. My list had 4 categories: Must have (safety, warmth, shelter and food and water; Functionally Redundant; Nice to have; and, Decadent. I started adding back in certain things (my limit was 2) on the 'decadent' list that added high value to the trip such as a stadium seat, 2nd stove, ultralight oven for baking, and slowly over time was able to upgrade to better, lighter, more robust, etc. gear.
Shifting to kayaking due to back issues caused a reshuffling of that gear list, and I had to shift to less, more uses, and lighter gear or risk having to pack the decks higher or 'trailer' the surplus.
That said, I will always take my Grandfather's Mitchell 300 reel and solid glass rod from the 1950s, along with new pole and reel for backup; all other gear is a blend of vintage (but tried and true) and new. I learned after a near fatal fall outing the critical importance of a working stove AND backup stove, and 'always dry' sleeping bag.

Thanks for the responses and I look forward to reading more.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13246)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
12/30/2019 12:29PM
3- Duluth packs 50 years old
1-14” Griswold cast iron fry pan about 90 years old
Brass candle lantern 50 years old
Boy Scout hatchet 55 years old

All these I use for preference sake. They are tried and true and will outlast me.
 
jwartman59
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12/30/2019 12:47PM
RTurner: "jwartman59: "
The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975."

That boat looks pretty vintage, too."

The canoe is a 1941 Peterborough Champlain cruiser. Last bwca trip was three years ago. I’ve got spinal issues that are slowing me down. Most of my gear is getting oldish. I live two miles from rei and probably go there once every two years. Canvas tents and cotton sleeping bags are all retired, I threw out a boys scout canvas baker tent and have really regretted that.


My 1970s vintage 18’ chestnut prospector. Perfect canoe for my dog. Not sure if it could be carried though.
 
CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/30/2019 12:48PM
Savage Voyageur: "3- Duluth packs 50 years old
1-14” Griswold cast iron fry pan about 90 years old
Brass candle lantern 50 years old
Boy Scout hatchet 55 years old


All these I use for preference sake. They are tried and true and will outlast me.
"


I would definitely consider the cast iron as decadent, but I understand the attachment. I could justify it as 'many uses', such as, bear weapon, anchor, one-pan cooking, boiling, wash pan!
 
CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/30/2019 12:52PM
Northwoodsman: "I have some Duluth Packs from the 70's or 80's. I have used them a few times in recent years. My CCS packs are way more comfortable.

Not to hijack the OP, but the question I have for the group is... If you still have vintage equipment, for nostalgic reasons would you ever consider a trip using only technology from a vintage era? Perhaps to retrace a trip you took back in the day.

For me the answer is easy, "No way"!"


I would, but would need three days instead of one for the trip in! And maybe a young, strong nephew to help with the heavier carrying.
 
CoyoteKid
member (11)member
 
12/30/2019 01:02PM
"And then, of course, I, myself, am vintage gear........................…"
"
What’s your idea of vintage? My 15 year old nephew thinks my iPhone 5 qualifies."

I am definitely 'vintage' as well! And I still use my i5...
 
justpaddlin
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12/30/2019 01:17PM
I've got a small carbide camping lantern from the 70's but don't use it because the fuel and fumes are toxic. I don't know if you can even buy fuel for it any more but I will say that it throws a lot of light for such a small and lightweight piece of equipment even compared to all the modern LED options. I've also got a 70's vintage brass stove (Optimus or Primus) that I don't use only because I like some of the newer options better but it's still a very effective stove even compared to newer ones. I do feel nostalgic when using my Buck model 119 fixed blade knife since we've known each other for a long time.

And if 1990's counts as vintage I'll say my Pat Moore Cues are still finer paddles than anything sold since and they do get used.
 
Savage Voyageur
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12/30/2019 04:14PM
CoyoteKid: "Northwoodsman: "I have some Duluth Packs from the 70's or 80's. I have used them a few times in recent years. My CCS packs are way more comfortable.


Not to hijack the OP, but the question I have for the group is... If you still have vintage equipment, for nostalgic reasons would you ever consider a trip using only technology from a vintage era? Perhaps to retrace a trip you took back in the day.


For me the answer is easy, "No way"!"



I would, but would need three days instead of one for the trip in! And maybe a young, strong nephew to help with the heavier carrying."


I normally trip with groups between 6-8 guys. We need 2 cast iron fry pans for walleyes and spuds. No worries with weight, it goes in the new guys pack.
 
Canoe42
distinguished member(1016)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/30/2019 07:59PM
I still bring my wife. Does that count?
 
jhb8426
distinguished member(1095)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/31/2019 01:53AM
Canoe42: "I still bring my wife. Does that count? "

Depends on if she's vintage or not. What's the odds you'll ask her that?
 
12/31/2019 05:02PM
jwartman59: "RTurner: "jwartman59: "
The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975."

That boat looks pretty vintage, too."

The canoe is a 1941 Peterborough Champlain cruiser. Last bwca trip was three years ago. I’ve got spinal issues that are slowing me down. Most of my gear is getting oldish. I live two miles from rei and probably go there once every two years. Canvas tents and cotton sleeping bags are all retired, I threw out a boys scout canvas baker tent and have really regretted that.


My 1970s vintage 18’ chestnut prospector. Perfect canoe for my dog. Not sure if it could be carried though"

Wow, beautiful canoes.
 
jwartman59
distinguished member(3116)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/01/2020 01:04PM
This a video of a group of Minnesotans that attempt to retrace the Hubbard expedition Using all traditional equipment. These guys have super solid canoe expedition experience. Labrador wins this one.
 
bwcadan
distinguished member(1464)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/01/2020 05:44PM
Does the BWJ aluminum fry pan qualify? Does not seem it should, but it is from the described century age wise.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1111)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/02/2020 02:51PM
1985 Quimby paddle is often the only paddle I bring in.
 
x2jmorris
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01/05/2020 08:00AM
My only vintage stuff is the cookware. I only cook over a fire no matter what up there and it is all old pots and pans.
 
Bearpath9
distinguished member (203)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/06/2020 07:59AM
Well, I have two lanterns, one Coleman 5114 that is probably from the late 70's or early 80's (I looked it up), and another that has no identifying marks, except 0200 stamped on the plate above where you attach the propane bottle. Probably Coleman, I have had it for years. Still use both of 'em. Also a Coleman suitcase stove, model 425F, which I probably bought in the early to mid 80's. It uses white gas, not propane. Since we will be base camping this season, it will come with, along with one of the lanterns. The only repairs I have made were on the stove. It developed a leak in the fuel valve, which I fixed with a little pipe tape wrapped around the threads.

Oh, I forgot the sleeping bag we bought in Yellowstone in the late 90's that I still use. The wife didn't think it would get cold there in July, so we didn't pack one, despite my assurances that it does get cold. Got below freezing, so I was at the general store before it opened that morning.
 
Ducksndirt
member (17)member
 
07/15/2020 01:10PM


I was planning on bringing this with me till the Corona virus got me, would have been arriving about this time. It’s a No. 530 Coleman, serial # dates back to late 40’s. It was my father-in-law’s. He used to be really big in the Scouts. It still works, I use it occasionally in the duck blind on really cold days when we need something warm on our bellies.
 
Nigal
distinguished member (156)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/15/2020 01:52PM


My LL Bean pack basket that was handed down from my father. I got a 20 liter bag as a liner and use it as a food pack.
 
CoyoteKid72
member (8)member
 
07/15/2020 02:21PM
Nigal: "


My LL Bean pack basket that was handed down from my father. I got a 20 liter bag as a liner and use it as a food pack. "


Sweet! Now that's really old school.
 
CoyoteKid72
member (8)member
 
07/15/2020 02:22PM
Wow, a 530 Coleman military stove, that's a beauty! I don't have one of those. But works the same no matter when it was made. Nice!
 
TipsyPaddler
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07/15/2020 02:35PM
GraniteCliffs:

And then, of course, I, myself, am vintage gear..........................."


Beat me to it :-)

Rest of my gear is relatively new and lightweight as I got into canoe camping somewhat late in life.
 
jillpine
distinguished member (487)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/15/2020 07:20PM
I have a Kelty two person tent that I purchased in the early 80's. My sons mostly use it now. It is unbelievable how it has held up. It is so well worn and durable. It smells just like it did when new. It must have over a thousand nights of use. Fourty years old x thirty nights/year.
 
straighthairedcurly
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07/15/2020 10:56PM
jwartman59: "
The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975."



I adore my Clement paddle from the 70's. Unfortunately it is in need of repair. I just dropped it off for a retired gentleman at my dad's assisted living who does beautiful woodwork. He said he should be able to make it as good as new :)
 
straighthairedcurly
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07/15/2020 10:59PM
Nigal: "
My LL Bean pack basket that was handed down from my father. I got a 20 liter bag as a liner and use it as a food pack. "

My husband has an old Maine pack basket from the late 60's or early 70's that he insists on taking on every family canoe trip.
 
lundojam
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07/16/2020 07:48AM
I got my down bag from the Ward's catalog 45 years ago. I like old stuff. I found a 1957 coleman lantern at a garage sale; works perfectly. Our newest tripping stuff is 20 years old.
 
MikeinMpls
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07/16/2020 08:40AM
I still use a Sawyer t-grip paddle that I bought at REI in the mid-80s. It has a tapered t-grip, meaning the grip ends kind of at a point rather than being the same width. Also, it is squared at the bottom, not rounded. I wish I had a pic to post. I've had it refinished several times. I may be replacing it with a sexy carbon model, though I still have allegiance to it. We've been through a lot together!!

Mike
 
07/16/2020 09:01AM
By Coyote kid's description of vintage I use a variety of old pre 2000 MSR stoves. Oldest of the bunch is a Firefly predecessor to the Dragonfly,
And occasionally a Peak One 220 lantern, (my impersonation of Diogenes).
And a Brunton Lucy Lantern,


butthead
 
CoyoteKid72
member (8)member
 
07/16/2020 09:25AM
I've never taken a lantern to the BWCA, since the mosquitoes almost always drove me into the tent by 9:30 every night. Also, was usually up there in July when the light hung around til 10. But if I did, it'd be a Coleman 222A!
 
07/16/2020 10:08AM
Sure. My canoes are from the '90s. I have a Granite Gear portage pack I got from another member who lives locally that dates to the 70s or 80s. Most of my Coleman stoves and lanterns are from the 70s or 80s too.

I don't take it on trips, but the oldest anything that I use just about daily is my 8" arc logo Lodge skillet. That baby's about 100 years old.
 
Grandma L
distinguished member(5369)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
07/16/2020 12:11PM
jwartman59: "
The pack is from the seventies. Still use my Clement paddle I bought in 1975."

Hey, does Clement still even make paddles - I have 2 that I protect.
 
07/16/2020 02:53PM
The portage monkeys, each having attained the age of 69, are the oldest of our gear...

TZ
 
scotttimm
distinguished member (349)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/16/2020 04:07PM
Two years ago I bought two original Eddie Bauer (not the newer big brand) down sleeping bags that I believe are late 60's early 70's for $20 each. No zipper. I put my two youngest kids in them, warmest bags we have, I believe. They just don't make down bags like that anymore. My son bought a $120 down, 20 degree backpacking bag from Hyke and Bike, which was great for the first two trips, and then epically failed in June, total compaction, unable to get fill to spread evenly, was miserable for him when the temps dropped to the lower 30's. My daughters, on the other hand, were toasty.
 
MossBack
member (41)member
 
07/16/2020 08:34PM
A drybag and a Nalgene bottle both purchased in late 1970's for my first trip, have made every trip since. I also take at least one of the Duluth packs in rotation so they get some regular oil on the leather. If there is a newbie or strong young fledgling Sherpa, they get the honor of carrying the Duluth.

MB
 
allfish
senior member (51)senior membersenior member
 
07/17/2020 09:39AM
...my knees and lower back???...
 
HowardSprague
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07/17/2020 10:17AM
I don't know if they qualify as "vintage", but I have my dad's US Army - issued down sleeping bag and poncho liner. The sleeping bag I use rarely - though it's very comfortable, but the poncho liner I bring on most trips. It's good as a liner, it's good as a light blanket on hot nights with my sleeping bag open, or I can keep it in a stuff sack as a pillow. As a kid, I used it to make cool camo "forts" in the house.
 
07/17/2020 11:02AM
I think the current military nickname for poncho liners is “woobie.” I have one and it’s very versatile. They are widely available online as surplus.
 
gkimball
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07/17/2020 07:00PM
!960's era camp stool for solos
1980 model year Alumacraft 17QTC - only if my 32 year old son comes on the trip
model year 1978 Svea 123R, original condition, my go to stove during fire bans when stoves with valves are required
 
07/18/2020 12:23PM
Not sure if qualifies as “gear” or not, but I still take some lures and plugs that my dad game in the 70’s.....I’ve spent a half hour a few times getting them out of tree branches on errant casts near shore.
 
gravelroad
distinguished member (306)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/20/2020 05:35PM
My SVEA 123 is older than yer newfangled one and still going strong. ;-)
 
07/20/2020 06:26PM
gravelroad: "My SVEA 123 is older than yer newfangled one and still going strong. ;-)"

Our second backpacking stove was a ~1973 Svea 123; before that we had a Sterno aluminum folding stove that was low heat with the Sterno can wide open and useless with the can partially blocked. When Sterno leaked, it turned gear/clothes in the pack a putrid pink. The nicest thing about the Svea 123 (and a couple other white gasoline stoves, like our WhisperLite) was turning it off--the silence was wonderful!

TZ
 
gkimball
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07/20/2020 08:51PM
TrailZen: "gravelroad: "My SVEA 123 is older than yer newfangled one and still going strong. ;-)"


Our second backpacking stove was a ~1973 Svea 123; before that we had a Sterno aluminum folding stove that was low heat with the Sterno can wide open and useless with the can partially blocked. When Sterno leaked, it turned gear/clothes in the pack a putrid pink. The nicest thing about the Svea 123 (and a couple other white gasoline stoves, like our WhisperLite) was turning it off--the silence was wonderful!


TZ"


Yes the sound was something you had to get used to. One good thing about it was you never had any trouble knowing if the stove was working!

Check out the latest new fangled gizmo:

Quiet Stove burner attachment
 
gravelroad
distinguished member (306)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/21/2020 10:09AM
gkimball:
Yes the sound was something you had to get used to. One good thing about it was you never had any trouble knowing if the stove was working!


Check out the latest new fangled gizmo:


Quiet Stove burner attachment "


Thanks for the tip! Field report to follow – the SVEA might just get to go hunting this year.
 
Duckman
distinguished member (389)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/22/2020 03:48PM
Oldest think I take is a wool blanket my dad bought with Marlboro points a long time ago.

It's quality.
 
CoyoteKid72
member (8)member
 
07/22/2020 04:39PM
Duckman: "Oldest think I take is a wool blanket my dad bought with Marlboro points a long time ago.


It's quality."

Would you say it's warmer than a sleeping bag? I have several from a house I purchased that came 'as is', and a camo bag liner (guess it's known as a 'woobie')...was thinking of trying the liner out for those warmer nights, but could also try the wool blankets....
 
Duckman
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07/23/2020 07:59AM
CoyoteKid72: "Duckman: "Oldest think I take is a wool blanket my dad bought with Marlboro points a long time ago.



It's quality."

Would you say it's warmer than a sleeping bag? I have several from a house I purchased that came 'as is', and a camo bag liner (guess it's known as a 'woobie')...was thinking of trying the liner out for those warmer nights, but could also try the wool blankets...."


I don't know if it's always warmer, but it sure is more pleasant to sleep under than in my sleeping bag. I take both. I usually go in May and the wool blanket is the easiest solution I have come up with for keeping the dog warm.
 
Model94
 
07/28/2020 10:07AM
1979 Jansport D-5. but i have to be honest, i just got a new pack. You should upgrade packs every 40 years whether you need to or not. Also just had to (broke my heart) throw out a pair of 80's green herman survivor boots. I loved those boots.
 
CoyoteKid72
member (8)member
 
07/28/2020 11:43AM
Model94: "1979 Jansport D-5. but i have to be honest, i just got a new pack. You should upgrade packs every 40 years whether you need to or not. Also just had to (broke my heart) throw out a pair of 80's green herman survivor boots. I loved those boots. "

40 years? Prepare for price sticker shock! I understand the attachment to footwear- had a pair of Sorels that I wore for 42 years of hunting and they literally had no tread left- I finally gave them a viking sendoff in a raging bonfire. I still have my original nylon pants purchased for my 2nd or 3rd bwca trip in the early 80's but the elastic waist is so stretched out I have to safety pin them. Time for a new pair!
 
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