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tomo
distinguished member (212)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/17/2020 10:17PM  
My copper spur ul is light and spacious, but I'm sick of the zipper vestibule catching, and I hate losing all the view when it rains. Have pondered making the switch to hammock, but I've never tried it so don't know how I'd actually sleep and the learning curve (and price curve) is daunting.

I think I've seen too many Bill Mason videos, because I've been enamored of the Baker/Campfire design. I want a porch, and a big mesh view. I want lightweight. I don't want to be totally without a view, unless it's a real beast of a rain.

The Backwoods bungalow seems like a more ultralight/modern take on the classic campfire, but I don't like the notion of a non-free standing tent. The big awning and huge door seem very appealing. (I'm aware of Leans, but am in the market for something for solo and with a floor.)

All of which to say I'm still on the lookout for a tent that truly meets my needs and checks my aesthetic boxes.
 
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ZaraSp00k
distinguished member(1457)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 06:49AM  
you mention cost of a hammock
know that the hammock forum is dominated by hammock Nazi's , you don't have to spend much on a hammock.
I've been doing it longer and in just as remote, if not more so, than everybody in that forum, my setup cost me maybe $50 or so. When I first started doing it I spent maybe half that back in the late 80's early 90's. I've even used the setup in subzero weather.

As for a tent, I still use my Kelty, which is a self supporting popular design with double doors and vestibules, you can't stand in it, but you can kneel and sit upright. When it ain't rainin' remove the rain fly/vestibule or keep the vestibules open and enjoy the view. Spent $99 on it twenty years ago. Again, there are tent Nazi's who will insist spending more to save a couple ounces. Good for them.
 
06/18/2020 07:54AM  
MSR had a similar lean to design the Missing Link. Never very popular and out of production. Small single wall tents are notorious for condensation. CCS makes a Lean shelter, larger and taller that I used solo for many seasons, big enough to offset condensation collection and a floor-less design, which offers many advantages over such a design with a floor. The condensation can just run down the walls onto the ground. You can get patterns for so called campfire tents and DIY.
The cost of hammocks seem to be modular, or additions to the system. The hammock by itself is not expensive, you could use a tarp and sleep system you already have for a start.

I have often setup my solo tent under a tarp so I could keep the door open or even take the fly off.
I know there have been solo and 2 person tents made with extendable canopies, Just cannot remember them right now.

butthead
 
mschi772
distinguished member(801)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 08:11AM  
Why not just pitch a small tarp over your tent so that you don't have to close the rain fly and lose your view in the rain? For ultimate views with a tarp pitched over a tent, how about a tent like the Alps Zephyr? That's basically just a free-standing bug mesh with a floor when the rain fly is removed.

Regarding hammocks ... they don't need to be expensive. A quality hammock sleep system is no more expensive than a tent sleep system, and you can piece it together slowly over time starting with just a simple hammock. Most of the quality makers like SLD, Dutchware, Warbonnet, etc have basic hammocks that are as well-designed as their other hammocks and are extremely affordable because they omit all the bells and whistles. They are no more expensive than stuff like ENO and ENO knock-offs which pale in comparison quality and comfort-wise. Once you have one of those hammocks and have determined that you're comfortable with it, you can add a bug net and tarp later while using your existing pad and sleeping bag for insulation. Farther down the line, if you want less weight/bulk, and better comfort, you can slowly swap your bag and pad for quilts.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14435)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
  
06/18/2020 08:16AM  
You really need a hammock. I’ve read your wants and needs and I really think it’s the best idea for you. I just get up in the morning, unzip the bug net and swing my legs out, just like your bed at home. There is plenty of room under my tarp for gear storage. I’m always high and dry, never had any problems with rain like tents have. I stand under my CCS tarp after getting out in the morning. With hammocks you can go as a beginner or expect. There is a learning curve. I suggest if you are serious to join our hammock forum here, or hammock forum online. Ask questions, maybe try out before you buy one. Hammocks are a game changer in the woods.
 
Tomcat
distinguished member(708)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 08:43AM  
 
06/18/2020 08:43AM  
 
06/18/2020 08:52AM  
ZaraSp00k: "you mention cost of a hammock
know that the hammock forum is dominated by hammock Nazi's , you don't have to spend much on a hammock.
I've been doing it longer and in just as remote, if not more so, than everybody in that forum, my setup cost me maybe $50 or so. When I first started doing it I spent maybe half that back in the late 80's early 90's. I've even used the setup in subzero weather.

I agree. I also have an inexpensive two person Byer of Maine Hammock, (I think it was about $30),a cheap off the rack one size fits all bug net for it, and an tarp.

I sleep like a baby in it, and I'm 6'2" and 260. I'm sure there are better set-ups than mine out there, but I'm content.

If I were you I'd try some entry level hammock gear, and test it out at home. Worst case if you're not in love with it and have a nice place to nap.
 
mschi772
distinguished member(801)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 08:56AM  
butthead: "Quick search and,
BA Copper Spur HV UL 1
Marmot Mantis
FLYTOP 3-4 Season 1-2-person Double Layer Backpacking Tent


butthead"


I assume that Mantis isn't free-standing, but there is something about it that I really like. I feel like that tent could be free-standing with some tweaking to the design, too.
 
Northwoodsman
distinguished member(2059)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 09:02AM  
I have a Copper Spur 4, a CCS Lean 2, and a CCS Lean 3. The CS is really quick and easy to put up alone and it has a floor to keep you dry but it's short and I too get tired of crawling in and out. The Leans are great because you can walk in and out (almost upright) and offer a great view. Condensation is an issue when it's cool and humid. You need to use the floor and make sure you keep it above the sod cloth if it rains to divert water under it. All 3 options are extremely light. You would be amazed at how much room the Lean 1 offers you. The foot print is 5' x 11.5', it is 5' tall at the peak (door side) and weighs under 2.5 lbs. The floor doesn't add much weight at all. We fit 4 people and all of our gear in the Lean 3 and it's very comfortable. The weight savings allows us to bring chairs for everyone.
 
06/18/2020 09:03AM  
mschi772: "I assume that Mantis isn't free-standing, but there is something about it that I really like. I feel like that tent could be free-standing with some tweaking to the design, too."


Yeah not freestanding but it has a frame set, similar to Sierra Designs Clip.

butthead
 
06/18/2020 09:07AM  
New Copper Spur allows pitching with a porch!
 
gravelroad
distinguished member(1017)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 09:33AM  
butthead: "MSR had a similar lean to design the Missing Link. Never very popular and out of production. Small single wall tents are notorious for condensation.
butthead"


"Ask the man who owns one." It meets all my requirements for three-season solo camping except it has a large footprint and needs to be staked at the corners and guylines, which makes it less than perfect for the BWCA. Never had a problem with condensation, as it vents extremely well from the low vent at the back out through the PORCH-LIKE view from the front door.

MSR Missing Link
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1727)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 10:03AM  
tomo: "...
(I'm aware of Leans, but am in the market for something for solo and with a floor.)
"


Why do you say that you need a floor?

I have a CCS Lean3 and a Kifaru tipi. Both of those do not have floors. It is actually quite liberating and refreshing to have a tent without a floor. There are definitely advantages to no floor. You can just walk in and out without taking your shoes off. You don't have to worry about spilling drinks or water spilling. Etc...

But... to be fair... floor can be nice in extremely wet areas. If there is a heavy downpour, you need to take special precautions to make sure that water doesn't enter your shelter and get your stuff wet.
 
06/18/2020 11:14AM  
gravelroad: "Ask the man who owns one." less than perfect for the BWCA. Never had a problem with condensation, as it vents extremely well from the low vent at the back out through the PORCH-LIKE view from the front door. "


I used a Lean 1+ for 10 years in the BWCA so yes I owned one of those. Never had a problem setting it up and never took extra poles. I also often just used a tarp and as vented as an open tarp is it still collected condensation. As long as the damp ran off to the ground no problem at all.

butthead
 
tomo
distinguished member (212)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/18/2020 11:43AM  
Great conversation!
A few thoughts/responses:
I should explore hammock camping. I've got a friend with a rig, so I could at least borrow it for a few nights, and seek other ways to try different set-ups. Thanks for the good reminders that it doesn't have to be an expensive undertaking.

I have and enjoy a lean 2, and have slept in it a few times, but for whatever reason I prefer a floor and full enclosure for sleeping (on my spring trip this year, I found a shocking number of wood ticks in my lean).

I've been intrigued by the Missing Link, which is no longer made. Good to hear from an owner who has one and likes it. I think the tent I linked to (single wall), has had issues with condensation, especially when weather forces a battening down of the hatches.

Thanks for other links--some of them look as though they would fit the bill. I have thought about pitching a tarp over the tent so I could keep the rainfly open.

Cool news about the new copper spur.

As I sit here and think about it, I think I'm probably best off pitching a tarp over my current tent, or exploring the world of hammocks. I'm not really that keen on buying another tent, but I can't get that Mason image out of my mind--sitting under the porch of his campfire tent, rain gently pattering down, a small fire going, mug of tea in hand, etc.

I was out solo a few weeks back and was stuck in the tent for half-a day (thunder and lightning, 41 degrees). I had my lean 2 with me but hadn't set it up the night before, and wasn't very inclined to do it in that moment...anyway, it reminded me how much I hate getting out of a wet, small vestibuled tent, and how much I miss looking around when confined to a tent (lean would have obviously helped) in the rain and in general.

Anyway, a few days ago I ordered a 10 x 12 CSS tarp, which I think I'll end up using more than the lean (bought the lean as a bug shelter for family trips), at least solo. But I am still vaguely pursuing the holy grail of comfort, view, storm-proof, etc. in a tent.


 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14435)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
  
06/18/2020 12:50PM  
If you borrow your friends hammock have him show you how to lay flat on the diagonal, not like a banana. You just turn a bit and you can lay mostly flat.
 
06/18/2020 10:42PM  
I too am hunting for that perfect tent. Just not a solo- I need one for 2 plus a dog.

One of my big issues with backpacking tents is this : while in the tent, having to crawl out to zip /unzip the fly. And the law height then leads me to touching the cold wet fly as I get out. And it just gets more annoying the older I get (arthritis issues).

I like the design of the CCS lean, but don't know if I could handle no floor. I'd be worried about bugs and maybe mice getting in. like into my sleeping bag especially if we stay in the same site for a few days. Yes, bugs in the BW are inevitable, but I like getting away from them when I sleep.



 
06/19/2020 06:26AM  
Savage Voyageur: "If you borrow your friends hammock have him show you how to lay flat on the diagonal, not like a banana. You just turn a bit and you can lay mostly flat. "


Agree. There's a big difference when sleeping in a "day" hammock like an Eno to a well built sleeping hammock like a Warbonnet. If it's not made to lay on a diagonal with room for your feet (like the Warbonnets) don't bother buying that type unless you want it for casual use.

I used a classic rope hammock in the 1980's and didn't lay on a diagonal. It was very painful in my lower back. Now, with my basic Warbonnet Blackbird I get the best sleep of the year and it's hard to want to get up in the morning. If you can borrow a friends and you like it, do yourself a favor and look at quality built dedicated sleeping hammocks. Warbonnet, Clark, Dutchware, etc.
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1727)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/19/2020 07:57AM  
Another option to look at is Kifaru tipis. I have an 8 man for hunting trips. I take it to the BW on early spring trips without a lot of portaging.

The 8 man is a castle for 2 people, gear, and a dog. It has a strong metal center pole. So not only can you stand up in it, you have a pole to help you stand up.

I also have a kifaru wood stove that I bring along. That is really cool when it gets very cold and rainy. But I haven't really needed the stove in the BW.

It doesn't help give the original poster his views of the outdoors (or his floor). But it is a nice shelter to think about...
 
ZaraSp00k
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06/19/2020 08:22AM  
Savage Voyageur: "If you borrow your friends hammock have him show you how to lay flat on the diagonal, not like a banana. You just turn a bit and you can lay mostly flat. "


on the other hand, some people sleep perfectly fine without being diagonal

in addition, some hammocks you lay fairly flat as well, so no need to lay diagonal

you won't know until you try
 
06/19/2020 08:55AM  
The Backwoods Bungalow looked interesting, but I noticed it's only 6 1/2 feet long (78"). That's not really long enough even if walls are perfectly vertical, especially if there's condensation issue. It's wide enough, a little taller than average tent. Not sure how stable it would be in strong wind though.
 
06/22/2020 12:43PM  
4keys: "I too am hunting for that perfect tent. Just not a solo- I need one for 2 plus a dog.


One of my big issues with backpacking tents is this : while in the tent, having to crawl out to zip /unzip the fly. And the law height then leads me to touching the cold wet fly as I get out. And it just gets more annoying the older I get (arthritis issues).


I like the design of the CCS lean, but don't know if I could handle no floor. I'd be worried about bugs and maybe mice getting in. like into my sleeping bag especially if we stay in the same site for a few days. Yes, bugs in the BW are inevitable, but I like getting away from them when I sleep.



"


Yeah, I have a few tents with very deep vestibules. My solution was to tie a length of cord between the zippers, and pull the cord to open the fly. My Alps Extreme 3, the green cord.
Far a bugproof the Lean I used was never a problem. Staked tight to the ground there is a substantial "snow flap' on the bottom. I used a solo tent floor to keep my sleeping gear off the ground.

butthead
 
TacoOverland
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
  
01/22/2023 10:05AM  
tomo: "Great conversation!
A few thoughts/responses:
I should explore hammock camping. I've got a friend with a rig, so I could at least borrow it for a few nights, and seek other ways to try different set-ups. Thanks for the good reminders that it doesn't have to be an expensive undertaking.


I have and enjoy a lean 2, and have slept in it a few times, but for whatever reason I prefer a floor and full enclosure for sleeping (on my spring trip this year, I found a shocking number of wood ticks in my lean).


I've been intrigued by the Missing Link, which is no longer made. Good to hear from an owner who has one and likes it. I think the tent I linked to (single wall), has had issues with condensation, especially when weather forces a battening down of the hatches.


Thanks for other links--some of them look as though they would fit the bill. I have thought about pitching a tarp over the tent so I could keep the rainfly open.


Cool news about the new copper spur.


As I sit here and think about it, I think I'm probably best off pitching a tarp over my current tent, or exploring the world of hammocks. I'm not really that keen on buying another tent, but I can't get that Mason image out of my mind--sitting under the porch of his campfire tent, rain gently pattering down, a small fire going, mug of tea in hand, etc.


I was out solo a few weeks back and was stuck in the tent for half-a day (thunder and lightning, 41 degrees). I had my lean 2 with me but hadn't set it up the night before, and wasn't very inclined to do it in that moment...anyway, it reminded me how much I hate getting out of a wet, small vestibuled tent, and how much I miss looking around when confined to a tent (lean would have obviously helped) in the rain and in general.


Anyway, a few days ago I ordered a 10 x 12 CSS tarp, which I think I'll end up using more than the lean (bought the lean as a bug shelter for family trips), at least solo. But I am still vaguely pursuing the holy grail of comfort, view, storm-proof, etc. in a tent.



"


I love my hammock setup and will never go back to a tent but, it is more complicated and there is a learning curve. For me that was a plus because I enjoy learning new things and being challenged to get better at them.
 
TacoOverland
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
  
01/22/2023 10:12AM  
Since you mentioned having a view, here’s a great example of why I love my hammock set up.

 
Graybeard
member (45)member
  
01/22/2023 10:18AM  
I agree with most of the positive comments here regarding hammocks. I had back surgery in my 30’s. I haven’t slept on the ground since then and can positively guarantee you that I never will again. My nights in a hammock are some of the best sleep I get. Age 66 and still learning…
 
ockycamper
distinguished member(1440)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/22/2023 01:59PM  
Graybeard: "I agree with most of the positive comments here regarding hammocks. I had back surgery in my 30’s. I haven’t slept on the ground since then and can positively guarantee you that I never will again. My nights in a hammock are some of the best sleep I get. Age 66 and still learning…"


Our group (16-20 men that divide into 3 groups) all went hammocks several years ago. Probably due to the age of the guys and how many times they have to "get up" at night. When we were in tents that meant crawling out on your knees, finding every rock and pebble.

I have a Eureka Chrysalis bridge hammock. You can sleep on your side, and there is storage for your clothes at each end. I can set it totally up in less then one minute.
 
TacoOverland
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
  
01/22/2023 02:25PM  
ockycamper: "
Graybeard: "I agree with most of the positive comments here regarding hammocks. I had back surgery in my 30’s. I haven’t slept on the ground since then and can positively guarantee you that I never will again. My nights in a hammock are some of the best sleep I get. Age 66 and still learning…"




Our group (16-20 men that divide into 3 groups) all went hammocks several years ago. Probably due to the age of the guys and how many times they have to "get up" at night. When we were in tents that meant crawling out on your knees, finding every rock and pebble.


I have a Eureka Chrysalis bridge hammock. You can sleep on your side, and there is storage for your clothes at each end. I can set it totally up in less then one minute."


Second only to my hammock setup is this;

Stansport Unisex Portable Urinal , Red, 11" L x 4.75" W x 4.75" H Pee bottle

Don’t even need to stand up. Never fails, never an issue. Never get out from under a warm quilt again. At almost 60 years old, this has been my go to for many years now and I wouldn’t be without it camping.
 
Tomcat
distinguished member(708)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/22/2023 02:38PM  
TacoOverland: "Since you mentioned having a view, here’s a great example of why I love my hammock set up.


"






Tent view:



 
cyclones30
distinguished member(4155)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/22/2023 05:59PM  
If you're losing a view in the rain in a tent, I'd think you'd lose the view under a tarp in your hammock too?? At least all the ones I've seen setup
 
TacoOverland
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
  
01/22/2023 06:01PM  
cyclones30: "If you're losing a view in the rain in a tent, I'd think you'd lose the view under a tarp in your hammock too?? At least all the ones I've seen setup "


Not necessarily so at all.



It has to one heck of a storm for me to abandon “porch mode”. Happened maybe 2 or 3 times over the years.
 
gravelroad
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01/22/2023 06:22PM  
DELETED BY AUTHOR.
 
Sparkeh
distinguished member (125)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/23/2023 05:43AM  
Hammock.
 
jillpine
distinguished member(911)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/23/2023 07:56AM  
I’m not much help with advice for a higher tent and vestibule, but I think you’d enjoy the learning curve with a hammock-tarp set up, and you might enjoy the different style of sleeping off the ground and often with a view that’s different than a tent. If you camp with mixed groups, you might miss the privacy a tent offers - or not. Depends on the space and the tarp set up.

I’ve been thinking that a good topic at the MWM spring expo would be hammock set up, like Dan does with CCS tarp set up. I think it would help people who are thinking of trying it but maybe a little overwhelmed at where to start, not to mention the fanaticism and terminology.

Areas where cost really factors in will be weight and warmth. If a person just starts with the basics of how to hang and how to sleep, and the associated knots and tarp tie-outs, it does not need to be expensive. Once the person figures out what they want and need in those realms, then informed purchases can be made - in the vein of buy once, cry once. As far as all the gear, the hardware, the rope and on and on - just ignore that until you figure out how to hang it and how to sleep in it.

I did some paddling last summer with folks who hadn’t used a hammock. While there was envy of being off the cold, wet ground, there was not envy about the complexity and lack of a little closed-in bubble (aka - a low tent and vestibule :). In some burn areas, finding safe hanging was a bit of a challenge. But no more so than when we bush-camped and those in tents were sleeping on roots and rocks. If there was a perfect solution, everyone would be doing all the same.

Given a choice, I prefer to sleep in a hammock. But I respect the tent option and use it when indicated.

Airing out after a stormy night in Wabakimi:
 
PriorImage
member (8)member
  
01/23/2023 08:52AM  
jillpine: "I’m not much help with advice for a higher tent and vestibule, but I think you’d enjoy the learning curve with a hammock-tarp set up, and you might enjoy the different style of sleeping off the ground and often with a view that’s different than a tent. If you camp with mixed groups, you might miss the privacy a tent offers - or not. Depends on the space and the tarp set up.


I’ve been thinking that a good topic at the MWM spring expo would be hammock set up, like Dan does with CCS tarp set up. I think it would help people who are thinking of trying it but maybe a little overwhelmed at where to start, not to mention the fanaticism and terminology.


Areas where cost really factors in will be weight and warmth. If a person just starts with the basics of how to hang and how to sleep, and the associated knots and tarp tie-outs, it does not need to be expensive. Once the person figures out what they want and need in those realms, then informed purchases can be made - in the vein of buy once, cry once. As far as all the gear, the hardware, the rope and on and on - just ignore that until you figure out how to hang it and how to sleep in it.


I did some paddling last summer with folks who hadn’t used a hammock. While there was envy of being off the cold, wet ground, there was not envy about the complexity and lack of a little closed-in bubble (aka - a low tent and vestibule :). In some burn areas, finding safe hanging was a bit of a challenge. But no more so than when we bush-camped and those in tents were sleeping on roots and rocks. If there was a perfect solution, everyone would be doing all the same.


Given a choice, I prefer to sleep in a hammock. But I respect the tent option and use it when indicated.

Airing out after a stormy night in Wabakimi:
"


For what it’s worth I would visit the expo for this alone. Even though I have years of experience hanging, I’m always looking for some new ideas and techniques.
 
JohnGalt
distinguished member (422)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/08/2023 02:51AM  
tomo: "I'm aware of Leans, but am in the market for something for solo and with a floor."


Lean+ served me well on an extended solo last year & the thought never crossed my mind to get another tent for this year. It's just about the perfect tent & the detached floor has it's perks. Going to sleep with a sight of the moon & stars is magnificent.
 
OldGuide2
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03/08/2023 05:23PM  
The best tent that meets these requirements is the one we've had for almost fifty years. It's a three-man designed by Gerry Cunningham that I can stand up in (I'm six-two). We added our own custom vestibule after a six-inch torrent one night on Gijikiki. Since I am sure the patent on this has expired I keep wondering why no one has duplicated the design. Have looked at and tried other designs over the years, but still keep using the Gerry. Have had to re-water proof it several times, but still use it. It's as much a part of my canoeing as my Old Town Guide and Clement paddle.
 
03/10/2023 09:07AM  
The biggest issue I see with the whole learning curve (and price curve) is that it is a "one or the other" situation. I'd love to try out a hammock, but then I'd have to carry it all in with me and I'm not going to carry both the tent and a hammock. I would have to commit to an entire trip in the hammock. I don't even know if I would be comfortable overnight in a hammock. Plus, we always sleep 2 in a tent, so both of us would have to make the switch at the same time or plan an awkward solo tent situation.

Then there is the cost factor. I would have to but a hammock, bug net, underquilt and tarp. Even if I go with cheap versions of everything, that is a lot just to test the idea out. And then, I need to consider my buddy again as well. He would have to do the same thing at the same time which just adds another layer of complication.

I like the idea of using a hammock, but I'm not sure I will ever make it actually work.
 
ockycamper
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03/10/2023 09:39AM  
I take a group of 15-20 men up to BWCA every fall (we divide into 3 groups). We all started out in tents 15 years ago. Now they are all in hammocks.

There are far more camp sites that you can put a hammock in we found, then ones that have flat areas that are grassy for tent pads. We are also all 50 years old up to 70's. We no longer can crawl out on our knees from a tent 3 times a night. As others have stated, getting out of hammock is just like getting out of bed. Lastly, hammocks will compress far smaller and often will weigh only a couple of lbs.

Ditch the tent and join the hangers!
 
DMan5501
senior member (75)senior membersenior member
  
03/10/2023 12:31PM  
Yep.. I too was tired of the nightly tent crawl .. started experimenting with hammocks in the 2000's with a Hennessey Safari.. but always felt like a banana, plus I'm as side sleeper.. thus left the gathered end hammocks behind.. Now I feel I have the best of both a tent and hammock when I discovered Tentsile 3 point products..
Absolutely a flat sleeping position, dual floor that the sleeping pad slides in and bomb proof fly.. Bonus also purchased the mosquito room that hangs below the unit .. Have 3 of their models Una 1 person (shown back & side) , Flite 2 person (shown with the mosquito room W/O fly) and 2 person Connect... (Not shown)

Very Happy Camper!

RW



 
ockycamper
distinguished member(1440)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/10/2023 02:11PM  
Why not a bridge hammock? Flat lay, and 1/2 the price and 1/3 the weight?
 
03/10/2023 02:56PM  
I'm not a fan of those suspended tents either. They are expensive, heavy, and they seem like they would put a lot of strain on the trees.

It might be easy to find 2 decent trees to hang a hammock, but 3 trees of the right size without other trees in the way plus leveling it seems like a pain.
 
DMan5501
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03/10/2023 03:18PM  
ockycamper: "Why not a bridge hammock? Flat lay, and 1/2 the price and 1/3 the weight?"


Ockycamper & A1t2o.. Appreciate your comments
The one I use most is the UNA... $299 and comes in at just over 4 Lbs complete.. Already had the proper pad for it... Thinking by the time you buy the Bridge Hammock, Upgraded Suspension & Under Quilt the cost would be over $299!
As for the leveling aspect I find it no more difficult than a 2 tree hammock.. slight tweaks are about the same once pitched.. Been using Tentsile products since 2018 Also have never had an issue finding the 3 trees needed for set up within the BWCA and Northern AZ. Plus from my experience you will still have a "Butt Sag" in a Bridge Hammock due to the lack of tension.. and there is really no strain on the trees in you utilize the recommended proper size tree.
Again - thanks... RW

 
jamdemos
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03/10/2023 03:44PM  
DMan5501: "Yep.. I too was tired of the nightly tent crawl .. started experimenting with hammocks in the 2000's with a Hennessey Safari.. but always felt like a banana, plus I'm as side sleeper.. thus left the gathered end hammocks behind.. Now I feel I have the best of both a tent and hammock when I discovered Tentsile 3 point products..
Absolutely a flat sleeping position, dual floor that the sleeping pad slides in and bomb proof fly.. Bonus also purchased the mosquito room that hangs below the unit .. Have 3 of their models Una 1 person (shown back & side) , Flite 2 person (shown with the mosquito room W/O fly) and 2 person Connect... (Not shown)


Very Happy Camper!


RW



"



Just forgot to mention that they weigh roughly 25lbs (3 Person), which even for canoe camping is heavy, and each ratchet is rated at 2.5 tons, so I'm guessing it puts a pretty hefty stress on the trees.
 
ockycamper
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03/10/2023 03:48PM  
I use a Eureka Chrysalis bridge hammock. Paid $200 for it and has its own mosquito net, rain fly and storage. Added an insulated pad $60 and was good to go.

Best of all, I can attach the straps, cinch it up and have it ready to go in under 2 minutes
 
03/10/2023 08:07PM  
Lot of hangers out there, good for you. Appreciate the benefits and have seem many cool pics of the setup. But I have been tent camping for 50 years and I am not about to change now. Don't want the expense or the learning curve and since I sleep "weird" I am not sure I would be comfortable in there anyways.

I do a lot of car camping and have a nice roomy BA tent for that that I can walk into and stand up in. Sleep on a comfy cot with a side table for the light and whatever. Even though I don't relish the feeling of clamoring in and out of my little 2 man tent on my knees that is 46 or so inches high I can make do once or twice a year in the BWCA. It is just such a central part of the experience for me I don't think I would want it any other way. Once you are in for the night, relaxing with a dim light and reflecting on the day, it is as cozy a place as I could ever want. I sleep quite comfortably with a quality sleeping bag and a good pad.

In 50ish trips I have never had a difficult time finding a spot to put the tent and it usually goes up in 2-3 minutes. Love the feeling of camp being setup, bag and pillow in the tent and back to chilling in camp.

So to all of you hangers, I am glad you enjoy it. it's likely not better, just different. I'll stick with my tent.
 
YetiJedi
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03/10/2023 09:14PM  
lindylair: "Love the feeling of camp being setup, bag and pillow in the tent and back to chilling in camp."


Well said. Can't wait for May!
 
Tomcat
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03/11/2023 10:23AM  
Deleted
 
HayRiverDrifter
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03/12/2023 09:11PM  
I too went through the transition from tent to hammock. It is not expensive to try. I bought a $20 hammock on woot.com (you can get these anywhere), used my sleeping pad in the hammock and my sleeping bag, and slept under my CCS 12x12 tarp. I used a Coleman bug net ($13) stretched over the hammock. The only issue was the pine beetle chewing it's way out of the pine log next to me all night :-)

Next I tried using my CCS 12x12 as a tarp shelter. This was actually a really great setup. You can leave the front open, or stake the first loop back from the end on the front corners and close the doors. Again the Coleman bug net tucked under my sleeping pad. It was so great to just get up and out from under the bug net, and walk out the front of the shelter.



Once I knew I liked the hammock, I bought the whole setup. My hammock setup cut 6 lbs from my pack weight and allows me to single portage when solo. I will likely not go back the ground.
 
NEIowapaddler
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03/13/2023 08:07AM  
Count me among the happy hammockers. I use an Amok Draumr hammock and I'll never sleep in a tent again unless I'm in an area without any suitable trees. Was it pricey? Yes. But without it I wouldn't be out there camping. It made that much difference in the quality of my experience. I never slept well on the ground, no matter what kind of pad I used. I would get up in the morning exhausted, with an aching neck and back that would bother me all day. Now I wake up refreshed and feeling good.
 
03/13/2023 06:42PM  
HayRiverDrifter: "
Once I knew I liked the hammock, bought the whole setup. My hammock setup cut 6 lbs from my pack weight and allows me to single portage when solo. I will likely not go back the ground.
"


6#? What kind of tent did you use? My solo tent is under 3#, 4 person tent weighs in right at 5#. I can see advantages to hanging if you sleep in a style that a hammock accommodates but weight savings really doesn't seem to be one.
 
Pilgrimpaddler
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03/13/2023 08:11PM  
I’m also a recent convert to hammocking. I was using an REI Halfdome 4 for about a dozen years then found out about CCS products and got a Lean+2. The Lean was a great improvement in space and weight, but I was still sleeping on a ground pad (Exped Downmat 9, so actually really comfortable). I’m in my mid 60s now and crawling on my knees to get in and out of bed at camp is not a daily highlight for me. So, I got a Superior Gear hammock set-up a couple years ago and I love it! No more crawling on the ground and it takes about 2 minutes to set it up. My son and guests get to use the Lean now.
 
HayRiverDrifter
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03/14/2023 10:14AM  
Banksiana: "
HayRiverDrifter: "
Once I knew I liked the hammock, bought the whole setup. My hammock setup cut 6 lbs from my pack weight and allows me to single portage when solo. I will likely not go back the ground.
"


6#? What kind of tent did you use? My solo tent is under 3#, 4 person tent weighs in right at 5#. I can see advantages to hanging if you sleep in a style that a hammock accommodates but weight savings really doesn't seem to be one."


My sleeping bag was about 3 lbs, pad, 2.5 lbs, and my tent was 6.5 lbs. I could have certainly cut weight by buying a lighter bag, pad, and tent, but decided to go with the hammock setup. My entire hammock setup (hammock, tarp, under quilt, and top quilt) is 6 lbs.
 
ockycamper
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03/14/2023 10:32AM  
My Hennessy Ultralite backpacker hammock is just 2 lbs. That is for the hammock, mosquito netting, rainfly and straps. The underquilt is just 18 ounces.

Just over 3 lbs for a fully functioning hammock, rain fly, mosquito net and insulation.

A solo tent with a sleeping pad is going to weigh more then that.

In our groups experience there are only two types of campers. . . .hammock campers, and tent campers that never yet tried a hammock
 
03/14/2023 06:45PM  
ockycamper: "My Hennessy Ultralite backpacker hammock is just 2 lbs. That is for the hammock, mosquito netting, rainfly and straps. The underquilt is just 18 ounces.


Just over 3 lbs for a fully functioning hammock, rain fly, mosquito net and insulation.


A solo tent with a sleeping pad is going to weigh more then that.

"


No it's not, ocky. Many options under 3 lbs. Here's one example without even going DCF for lighter weight. Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo with stakes, pole, extra guyline, and Thermarest NeoAir XLite NXT sleep pad, 4.5 r-value, total weight 43 oz.

 
hernfiry
member (25)member
  
03/17/2023 08:39AM  
TacoOverland: It has to one heck of a storm for me to abandon “porch mode”.


Is that a Hammock Gear setup? I've been looking at getting into hammocks and I already have one of their top quilts. Do you like it?
 
PriorImage
member (8)member
  
03/17/2023 09:02AM  
hernfiry: "
TacoOverland: It has to one heck of a storm for me to abandon “porch mode”.



Is that a Hammock Gear setup? I've been looking at getting into hammocks and I already have one of their top quilts. Do you like it?"


I love it. Most of my kit is Hammock Gear or Dutchware. Under quilt is HG as is Top Quilt. I also add an underquilt protector. Silnylon dream tarp from UGQ has been awesome. I can cook and hangout under it as well. I’m considering upgrading the tarp to Cuban Fiber but the $$$!
 
Marten
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03/17/2023 04:22PM  
Mad_Angler: "
tomo: "...
(I'm aware of Leans, but am in the market for something for solo and with a floor.)
"



Why do you say that you need a floor?


I have a CCS Lean3 and a Kifaru tipi. Both of those do not have floors. It is actually quite liberating and refreshing to have a tent without a floor. There are definitely advantages to no floor. You can just walk in and out without taking your shoes off. You don't have to worry about spilling drinks or water spilling. Etc...


But... to be fair... floor can be nice in extremely wet areas. If there is a heavy downpour, you need to take special precautions to make sure that water doesn't enter your shelter and get your stuff wet."



Horror of horrors to set up on soft moss and have all the bugs rise up at dusk. Friend Jimbo lost a few pints that way!
 
tomo
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03/22/2023 10:22AM  
I like that this thread is still alive. I figured I should report back. I ended up buying a Draumr hammock, but I sold it because I didn't like the precarious entry/exit--though I think it's something I would have gotten used to over time. From there I ended up buying a Warbonnet Blackbird xlc, which I have enjoyed greatly. For BWCA trips the hammock is now my go to. Thanks all for the suggestions.
 
OldGuide2
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04/05/2023 03:34PM  
I finally found a couple of photos of the Gerry tent. One with vestibule down the other with it raised. The vestibule was something we modified and added on to. I can stand up in the tallest part of the tent to give you some idea of height. Am enclosing in hopes some manufacturer will revive the design. It sheds wind and rain well and has plenty of room.
 
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