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cowboymac12
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/23/2020 09:16PM
For tying down all the loops on the sides of tarps for that extra tight look and feel, how do you create the appropriate length? Do you buy long pieces of paracord and cut to the appropriate size in the field, or just create a series of 10 or 20 ft pieces? or something else? What is the best way to go?
 
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TipsyPaddler
distinguished member (203)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/23/2020 09:39PM
I use 1/8” poly cord on my CCS tundra tarp.

CCS 1/8” Poly Cord

For my hammock tarps I use Dyneema cord. When I need to replace the poly cord on my tundra tarp I will probably switch to dyneema.
Dyneema

I put 12 feet on each tie out point. But I also bring a couple pieces of 8-10’ cordage. Seems there is often a tie out point just a foot or so longer than the guy line.
 
06/23/2020 09:44PM
My tarp is completely rigged with ridgeline and guylines plus some extra cordage. I have 20-foot guylines, but may cut them down. I use the yellow cord that comes with CCS tarps, not paracord.
 
GearGuy
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06/23/2020 09:44PM
No. I cut no rope on my trips, and no I don't have tag ends of rope hanging everywhere lol. Stay with me.

I have Tarp worms from Dutchware attached to shock cord loops which are fed through themselves, over a loop of the tarp. This allows me to change tie out points on the tarp by unlooping it from itself, and looping it back over itself in whatever tarp loop I need. If you're not familiar with dutchware tarp worms, they are a piece of metal 1/5th the size of a dime, and allow you to tie out a tarp as tight as you want, in a single move, with no knots.

On the stake side, I have 8 stakes per tarp. Attached to each stake is a single strand of guy line that feeds through the tarp worms. 4 of the stakes have a rope strand that is "shorter" and are about 6 feet long. The other 4 stakes have a rope that is "longer" and about 10' long. The end of the rope attached to the stake feeds through the tarp worm, loops over itself to securely hold the tarp, and that's it. To free it you just pull on the end of the rope. I've had these tarps tied out in 20 mph winds, the tarp worms are solid don't let the rope move at all

I usually hang my tarp flat like a ceiling. I simply take the stake, and loop the end of the stake rope through the loop at the stake end. I just wrap it around a branch, tree, w/e I can grab with the rope, loop around it, and then tie off to the tarp. No knots. To free it from the free or branch I just grab the stake, and pull. Conversely when I'm hammocking I set the stakes up to pull the Tarp down like an A Frame. Or I leave the short stake side down half A Frame style, and then I "porch mode" the long 4 stakes on branches/bushes/branches/etc.

If you're not familiar with dutchware tarp worms, or dutchware hardware, watch this 40 second video by dutch himself. Tarp Worm Video

Side note: I welcome all challengers, no one can set up a 10x14 tarp faster than me!
 
IndyCanoe
senior member (87)senior membersenior member
 
06/24/2020 11:04AM
I picked up 180 ft of zing-it cord it is lighter and far less bulky compared to paracord. I did precut several pcs. Cannot remember the lengths now as it was several years ago but I want to say maybe a 30' pc for the ridgeline, a few 20' pcs and 15' pcs and i believe the rest were 10'. I wrap each smaller section of rope separately and store in a small mesh bag. When its time to set up just pull out as many sections as i will need and attach to the tarp. I do have a bowline tied to one end of each section for easy attachment to the tarp.

zing-it
 
06/24/2020 12:22PM

I'm not a fan of thin cordage, hard on hands and difficult knots. Started out with 550 paracord but that was disappointing due to stretch, tangles, and knot untying. Quickly started filling out with 1/8 inch/3mm twist or braided poly cordage, same as CCS sells.
I'll take a 80 foot section divided into 40 foot 20 and 20 feet. I will buy several 80 foot sections at a time, for replacement and cutting into shorter hunks.
My normal set is a 40 foot section high overhead dropped to center loop, 4 corners with 20 foot sections.

butthead
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/24/2020 01:37PM
butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1665)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 03:05PM
GearGuy: "...
I usually hang my tarp flat like a ceiling. I simply take the stake, and loop the end of the stake rope through the loop at the stake end. I just wrap it around a branch, tree, w/e I can grab with the rope, loop around it, and then tie off to the tarp. No knots. To free it from the free or branch I just grab the stake, and pull. Conversely when I'm hammocking I set the stakes up to pull the Tarp down like an A Frame. Or I leave the short stake side down half A Frame style, and then I "porch mode" the long 4 stakes on branches/bushes/branches/etc.
"


Do you have pictures of some of your set ups?
 
Jaywalker
distinguished member(2183)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 03:49PM
No paracord for me. I use the CSS yellow cord for my ridgeline, about a 50 foot section which stays attached. For the sides, I use green 3mm PMI utility cord from REI. My tent has 5 tie outs per side but I don't usually keep lines on all of them. I usually keep the 4 corners, the two middles, and usually just one other tied on at any time. Each tie out line is about 10 feet long, and I keep 3-4 additional 8 foot sections I call "extenders" wound up at the bottom of my tarp bag. Most of the time, the 10 foot fixed sections are enough, but if they dont quit reach the branch I want I add an extender. If winds are stiff, I'll also add more tie outs, especially on the windward side. The reason I use different colors is it makes it easy for me to see whats what as I am packing and unpacking the tarp.
 
TominMpls
distinguished member(613)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 04:14PM
butthead: "


butthead"


Yeah that's an impressively sweet setup.
 
OldFingers57
distinguished member(5013)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
06/24/2020 06:10PM
We carry pre cut lengths of paracord and the cord Dan has in 20 ft lengths.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 06:36PM
"For tying down all the loops on the sides of tarps for that extra tight look and feel, how do you create the appropriate length? Do you buy long pieces of paracord and cut to the appropriate size in the field, or just create a series of 10 or 20 ft pieces? or something else? What is the best way to go?"

For me I typically cut 80' hank into 5 Lengths. Four 15' lengths and one 20 foot and that has served me well for my spare cordage. I wrap them around my outstretched hand and then wrap them 4 times in one direction and then crossover and wrap towards the opposite end.


My take on cords - disclosure I am a knot guy and I sell cord so I am biased.

Paracord has become like Kleenex® there is a particular brand/(layup) and there are many versions that appear on the surface to be the same.
What the cord is made from will effect performance each has it's pluses and it's drawbacks on what level of performance you are looking for. Nylon stretches a good amount and it's length will change with the humidity in the air or rain soaked verses dry. Polyester stretches very little and its length is unaffected by changes of humidity, Dynema/ spectra is also unaffected by changes of humidity and has virtually no stretch. Every layup has a different strength but Dynema/ spectra will win the strength test every time, and per foot will set you back the most. The hand of the rope. Wether it is a stiff or loose hand will affect knot tying and untying and how they react in mechanical tension devices that often the eliminate the need for a knot but may require threading them in a set way.

Color for me says it needs to be visible, (so colors that stand out) as often the cords cross through the working area of a campsite often just above eye level but below the crown of your head. Some cords have reflective material woven into the sheath, so your headlamps light at night will be reflected back to you if the cord is in your direction of your headlamps light.

There are many cords out there, with many different layups and sheathing materials. Remember also knots reduce the working strength of the rope 40-60%, not sure what the mechanical tensioning devices do to the working strength or the sheathing. a quick google search on cord did not turn up anything about testing.

I like knots because I am able to do many different things with cordage as the situation requires. My favorite Tarp knots are the Bowline, Truckers hitch with a quick release, Siberean Hitch, and Prussik.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13183)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
06/24/2020 07:12PM
Kanoes, (Jan) taught me this trick. At home you cut your coadage to 6’ lengths and tie a 6” loop on each end. Repeat this for all of your coadage, and hook the loops on a caribiner for tangle free storage. Example in camp using this method is if you need a clothes line between two trees that look like they are 15’ between them grab 4 lengths and just loop the ends and tie off around the tree. Next time you might have a 20’ space, just add another hank of cordage. The beauty of this system is you just unloop the sections and store tangle free back on the Caribener. I can’t tell you how much paracord I’ve thrown away that we all different lengths before I switched to this method. I use this for clothe lines, ridge lines, tarp tie downs, just about anything.
 
GearGuy
distinguished member (111)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 08:40PM
Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"

I don't see what's perfect about it. That's an insanely huge bag of absolutely unnecessary lengths of rope. he's effectively carrying the mass of 2 tarps just to hang one tarp. Just because you've been doing something a long time doesn't mean at all that you do it well. I appreciate the trail cred but at some point one must acknowledge the new school and how vastly superior it is...none of my rope stretches (at all, Lash It is KING), it's 1.75mm compared to his gigantic diameter paracord, and every single on of my tie outs, and ridgeline, fit inside the original tarp bag and don't add any noticeable bulk....

Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol!
 
gotwins
distinguished member (107)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 08:55PM
This is downright genius, SavageV!
 
jhb8426
distinguished member(1063)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/24/2020 11:27PM
I carry a combination of 10 ft. and 20 ft. lengths as well as one 40 ft. piece for the ridgeline. Also carry some extra to cut/use as needed. Have a 3 in. loop on one end of the 10 and 20 foot sections.

GearGuy: "I don't see what's perfect about it?"
It's all a matter of perception...
 
06/24/2020 11:38PM
GearGuy: "Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"



I don't see what's perfect about it? That's an insanely huge bag of absolutely unnecessary lengths of rope. he's effectively carrying the mass of 2 tarps just to hang one tarp. Just because you've been doing something a long time doesn't mean at all that you do it well. I appreciate the trail cred but at some point one must acknowledge the new school and how vastly superior it is...none of my rope stretches (at all, Lash It is KING), it's 1.75mm compared to his gigantic diameter paracord, and every single on of my tie outs, and ridgeline, fit inside the original tarp bag and don't add any noticeable bulk....


Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol!"


Well gee, you did not notice but the tarp was in the black bag in the first photo and is as stored in my garage. As I do not care to carry it all on a trip. Usefully 6 pieces of cord and the tarp is all that is taken, I know how to tie knots. I did not claim it perfect but appreciate the responses. And never said it's THE BEST way, just my way. Oh, I have been using a GPS probably longer that you (1990's), but will always take maps and compass, and do wear leather boots that are neither clunky or terribly heavy.

butthead
 
Tomcat
distinguished member (464)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 07:45AM
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1665)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 08:37AM
This message has had HTML content edited out of it.
Tomcat: "This is a recreational gear forum in which individual capabilities, interests, and priorities vary. When sharing it is helpful to understand the OP's intended purpose ( how they intend to use the equipment ) and the performance requirements desired. Without consideration of tripping styles and performance goals we somtimes assume our own priorities and the discussion can be unconstructive.


I no longer use tarps but when I did I prefered the flexability of placement and consistent setup that poles allow. With poles the guy line length is more consitant and extentions less likely needed.


"


That is a beautiful setup. I can see the benefits of having a consistent setup. The poles are probably not that heavy either.

I personally enjoy the challenge of figuring out how to make a good setup with the available trees. I generally use a center ridgeline setup these days. I can usually find enough trees to make that work.

Also, I often tie down to exposed roots. I have never used a stake for a tarp in the BW. I never thought of it. Now, I will consider that them and add them to my available toolbox.

 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/25/2020 09:31AM
GearGuy: "Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"

I don't see what's perfect about it."

Interesting comment. I was commenting on the SETUP.

One look at the tarp hung efficiently from the center loop with the corners and sides rigged out to adjacent trees for a perfectly squared and rigid tarp setup is all I needed to see. Nicely done.
 
schweady
distinguished member(6916)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
06/25/2020 10:44AM
Jackfish: "GearGuy: "Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"

I don't see what's perfect about it."

I'm gonna call 'perfect.' At least from the standpoint of a guy who is happy enough when the two of us can sit out in the rain and stay dry under our 12x12 Guide Gear tarp. Confounds me how to get all four edges taut on those parabolic cut things, so I call it success when I get it down to just one sagging rain collection pocket... :-)
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13183)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
06/25/2020 10:45AM
TominMpls: "butthead: "



butthead"



Yeah that's an impressively sweet setup."


I agree Ken great tarp deployment. And that accolade is coming from a guy that has had 5 GPS units, Paper Topo maps, likes leather boots, cast iron fry pans, and IPA beer.
 
fishonfishoff
distinguished member(574)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 11:15AM
We just use various lengths of paracord from previous trips and usually have to cut new sections depending on the tarp setup. "Low budget visitors"

What I don't understand is why the US Forest Service didn't plant 4 trees in every campsite exactly where a normal tarp would be hung? What were they thinking about 40-60 years ago? You would also think they would have also thought about all the hammock trees which people would be needing in the future! …………………….Just Kidding!

FISHONFISHOFF
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(1798)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 12:35PM
GearGuy: "Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"

I don't see what's perfect about it. That's an insanely huge bag of absolutely unnecessary lengths of rope. he's effectively carrying the mass of 2 tarps just to hang one tarp. Just because you've been doing something a long time doesn't mean at all that you do it well. I appreciate the trail cred but at some point one must acknowledge the new school and how vastly superior it is...none of my rope stretches (at all, Lash It is KING), it's 1.75mm compared to his gigantic diameter paracord, and every single on of my tie outs, and ridgeline, fit inside the original tarp bag and don't add any noticeable bulk....

Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol!
"

Gearguy,
this isn't a competition. It's an exchange of knowledge. You may argue until you are red in the face that your way is superior for yourself, but belitting people for the way they want to camp makes you look immature and petty.

Your arrogant, smug and judgmental attitude about gear and other people's techniques is detrimental to convincing people to learn from you.
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1665)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 01:03PM
GearGuy:"I don't see what's perfect about it. "
It is quite a good setup.

1. It really only used 4 ropes. The continuous rope on the back side is nice.

2. All 4 corners are perfectly taut. They seem balanced. And there doesn't seem to be any sagging spots to collect water.

3. The raised center is nice. It gives a good peak to deal with rain and a nice high roof to keep from feeling claustrophobic. I also shows determination since it probably took some time and practice to be able to throw ropes high enough to provide the connection needed.
 
06/25/2020 01:48PM
Mad Angler, "shows determination since it probably took some time and practice to be able to throw ropes high enough"

Not so much determination needed, I use a BDB to secure a small bag of stones to a piece of cord and a tent pole section. I can poke that over a limb 15 feet up. Hang the stone bag over the limb and pull the pole section out of the BDB.
I'm not in any competition though so sometimes I just toss the bag, after a few attempts I usually get it. Kind of like theraputic basket weaving.

butthead
 
06/25/2020 02:35PM
Gear Guy,
I don't know where that chip on your shoulder comes from. You know nothing about how I trip or use my gear.

Your assumptions:
1. "That's an insanely huge bag of absolutely unnecessary lengths of rope. he's effectively carrying the mass of 2 tarps just to hang one tarp.". As I pointed out the black bag is for storage and vehicle based camping and hold the CCS 10x12 tarp in it, all the cords, the hardware, and stakes. All together in a bag of less volume than the bag supplied by CCS. When canoe tripping I'll pack the cordage a 40 foot and five 20 foot hunks, no hardware, no stakes, and the tarp in a pack pocket. You whiffed badly there!
2. "gigantic diameter paracord,". Again I state I do not like handling cordage smaller than 3 mm because it's a pain with my 69 year old hands, it's not even twice the Lash It diameter, and none of it is paracord. Another big whiff!

This isn't the first time you have belittled me in threads. I never stated my suggestions as better, best, or you're stupid not to use what I do. Those are opinionated, immature statements. Grow up, learn some manners, you're not the "biggest, best-est Gear Guy" by far.

butthead
 
mschi772
distinguished member (408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2020 07:13PM
At its core, I get what GearGuy was trying to say, but, wow, was that a really rude way of expressing himself! I might even go so far as to say that was straight-up mean. This isn't the first time I've seen rude posting from GearGuy, either. I sure hope it's the last one I see, though.
 
ashlandjack
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
06/29/2020 05:53AM
Butthead, please continue with your advice and experience. You have taken your time to help me through these posts and I appreciate it very much. I, too, am getting older and have to compensate for that in different ways, but some things you just don't have to excuse no matter how old you get .
 
06/29/2020 08:10AM
ashlandjack: " I, too, am getting older and have to compensate for that in different ways, but some things you just don't have to excuse no matter how old you get . "

Never considered stopping my input, too stubborn! And I'm not offering any excuses, just alternatives. Too much history and friendships developed with members to let go of.

Just do me a favor if I ever use such descriptions and terms as,

"Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol! "

kick me in the ass for being a jerk.

cowboymac12, whatever you choose you can work with it! Pre-fixed lengths or cut on the site can be used, but to settle it for yourself hang a tarp in your back yard or a local woods for practice. That's the best way to determine what works for you.

butthead
 
cowboymac12
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/29/2020 08:40AM
And here I was thinking you were a monkey climbing these trees!

Thank you all for the great info. I am a huge fan of Bowlines and the ever handy trucker's hitch, and a believer if you can tie these two knots, you will go far.
 
06/29/2020 09:00AM
cowboymac12: "And here I was thinking you were a monkey climbing these trees!

Thank you all for the great info. I am a huge fan of Bowlines and the ever handy trucker's hitch, and a believer if you can tie these two knots, you will go far."


Too old, but can still get up in a tree if I have to. Sounds like your ready to spend some time hanging a tarp cowboymac!

butthead
 
ashlandjack
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
06/29/2020 09:45AM
butthead: "ashlandjack: " I, too, am getting older and have to compensate for that in different ways, but some things you just don't have to excuse no matter how old you get . "
Never considered stopping my input, too stubborn! And I'm not offering any excuses, just alternatives. Too much history and friendships developed with members to let go of.

Just do me a favor if I ever use such descriptions and terms as,

"Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol! "

Kick me in the ass for being a jerk.

cowboymac12, whatever you choose you can work with it! Pre-fixed lengths or cut on the site can be used, but to settle it for yourself hang a tarp in your back yard or a local woods for practice. That's the best way to determine what works for you.

butthead"

My meaning you never excuse small thinking from little mines.

 
ashlandjack
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
06/29/2020 09:51AM
Still can't get it right. What the heck. Thanks for your help butthead.
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/29/2020 10:24AM
Ashlandjack, if you're looking to make a post using the "Reply with Quote" function, just remember to type your response AFTER the last < / quote > .
 
06/29/2020 10:30AM
ashlandjack: "Still can't get it right. What the heck. Thanks for your help butthead."

Quite sure I got IT, and your welcome!

butthead
 
ashlandjack
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
06/29/2020 03:49PM
Jackfish: "Ashlandjack, if you're looking to make a post using the "Reply with Quote" function, just remember to type your response AFTER the last < / quote > ."
Thanks Jackfish for your help.
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/29/2020 08:12PM
ashlandjack: "Jackfish: "Ashlandjack, if you're looking to make a post using the "Reply with Quote" function, just remember to type your response AFTER the last < / quote > ."
Thanks Jackfish for your help."

Look at that... Perfect! :)
 
Argo
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/30/2020 08:14AM
Mad_Angler: "
I personally enjoy the challenge of figuring out how to make a good setup with the available trees. I generally use a center ridgeline setup these days. I can usually find enough trees to make that work.


Also, I often tie down to exposed roots. I have never used a stake for a tarp in the BW. I never thought of it. Now, I will consider that them and add them to my available toolbox.
"


Same here.

Five knots I have found make the world of tarps infinitely easier to manage:

1) Trucker's knot - a great way to apply tension to your ridge-line and tie-outs. And when slipped, it comes apart with a simple pull. I have found you can slip para-cord and it will remain secure.
2) Prusik knot - secure the end loops of your tarp to the ridgeline.
3) Bowline - for making loops in the ends of your ropes.
4) Sheet bend - for joining two ropes together - or a fisherman's knot will do.
5) Siberian Hitch (Note: I originally identified this knot as a Kalmyk Loop. Thanks to Dan Cooke for correcting me) - When you want to get your ridge-line high in a tree beyond your reach. Tie the end of your rope to a small log and toss it over a high branch near the trunk then pull the tag end down and tie this knot. As you pull on the standing end, the knot will rise and secure up high in the tree at the height of the branch you initially chose. It is important to leave a length of the tag end long enough that you can reach it from the ground as this is a slip knot and releases with a pull on the tag end.

 
Goldenbadger
distinguished member(1105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/30/2020 05:00PM
I love reading about and seeing how others set up their tarps. I’m not that good at it and love learning from you guys. And don’t sweat GearGuy’s response. From what I could see he’s butt hurt that Butthead received praise and he didn’t. Butthead’s explanation was simple and his pic showed a beautiful setup. GearGuy’s had, well, none of that. Well done setup, Butthead.
 
DanCooke
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06/30/2020 05:08PM
Argo I will need to check out the Kalmyk loop. I would add the Siberean hitch to secure the first end of a ridgeline style set up simple to tie, and unties with a simple pull.
 
Argo
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/30/2020 08:06PM
DanCooke: "Argo I will need to check out the Kalmyk loop. I would add the Siberean hitch to secure the first end of a ridgeline style set up simple to tie, and unties with a simple pull."

Mea culpa!!!

It's a Siberian hitch not Kalmyk loop. Thank you. I'll try to fix my post.
 
06/30/2020 08:23PM
I'll third the Siberian Hitch
 
Argo
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
07/01/2020 08:10AM
Goldenbadger: "I love reading about and seeing how others set up their tarps. I’m not that good at it and love learning from you guys. And don’t sweat GearGuy’s response. From what I could see he’s butt hurt that Butthead received praise and he didn’t. Butthead’s explanation was simple and his pic showed a beautiful setup. GearGuy’s had, well, none of that. Well done setup, Butthead. "

Setting up a tarp is both a science and an art.

For years I used to "wing-it". The result was always a floppy mess that was way too time consuming to erect and take down -

Then one day I decided to hit YouTube and see how the pros did it. I emphatically recommend you do this if you are in the position I described. Every minute you invest in those lessons will save you fifty in the field.

I'm pretty sure every tarp manufacture designs these things to go up taught without wrinkles and flapping.

Learning and practicing valuable knots will be one of your most labour-saving tools and with a little practice, will guarantee your tarp looks similar to that magnificent specimen you see on the original packaging.

Trust me, many of these knots have been around for centuries and for good reason. Feel free to try and invent one and good luck to you. It's what what everyone does when they don't know knots and it usually ends in disaster :). Been there done that.
 
07/01/2020 08:41AM
Thanks Leann! And here is another for you to figure out,
Island camp on Finger Lake, 3 tarps one set as a wind wall and strung to keep from flapping.

butthead
 
Zanzinger
senior member (71)senior membersenior member
 
07/01/2020 08:59AM
Ahh the elusive tarp setup..

I've tackled this with some energy this year and I think I've made some progress. Right now I have a 20 foot ridgeline with a loop on one end and the plan is to connect that along the long edge of the tarp to two trees. Then on each end I have a Prusik knot that I will loop into the tarp with some shock cord. The same on the other long edge and some shorter lengths to tighten it up.

The big mystery to me is the center loop hang. It seems like people are throwing that line up and over something...any other tips on that?
 
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1665)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/01/2020 09:21AM
I have come to really like the center ridgeline setup. I leave the ridgeline attached and have 4 hanks of ropes tied to the 4 corners. It goes up quite quickly and offers quite a bit of protection. Center ridgeline
 
Zanzinger
senior member (71)senior membersenior member
 
07/01/2020 09:50AM
Mad_Angler: "I have come to really like the center ridgeline setup. I leave the ridgeline attached and have 4 hanks of ropes tied to the 4 corners. It goes up quite quickly and offers quite a bit of protection. Center ridgeline "

I came across that post as well myself and I have to say I don't hate it. I could easily adapt my current ridgeline rope to use for the center.
 
Argo
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
07/01/2020 10:36AM
Zanzinger: "Ahh the elusive tarp setup..


I've tackled this with some energy this year and I think I've made some progress. Right now I have a 20 foot ridgeline with a loop on one end and the plan is to connect that along the long edge of the tarp to two trees. Then on each end I have a Prusik knot that I will loop into the tarp with some shock cord. The same on the other long edge and some shorter lengths to tighten it up.


The big mystery to me is the center loop hang. It seems like people are throwing that line up and over something...any other tips on that? "


About using a loop for one end of the ridgeline...depending on the height of your ridge that may be okay. But if you want or need a high ridge, you have to think about how to disassemble that connection on take-down as it will be stuck up high - perhaps out of your reach. The Siberian knot overcomes this. I have a heavy 15x15 tarp that I only take on base camping (non-portaging trips) that requires a fairly high ridgeline. Smaller tarps not so much.


One other point - and perhaps Dan Cooke could speak to this - it is advantageous to run the ridgeline through the loops instead of under the tarp. This will prevent abrasion of the water repellent coating (promoting longevity) and also prevent water from running along the ridgeline rope and dripping under the tarp. This necessitates stringing your tarp through the loops before BEFORE you attach the second end of the ridgeline.
 
07/01/2020 10:41AM
Zanzinger: "Ahh the elusive tarp setup..
The big mystery to me is the center loop hang. It seems like people are throwing that line up and over something...any other tips on that? "


"Not so much determination needed, I use a BDB to secure a small bag of stones to a piece of cord and a tent pole section. I can poke that over a limb 15 feet up. Hang the stone bag over the limb and pull the pole section out of the BDB." from earlier post."
Just use what ya got.
Far as ridgeline setup I do those often also,

I think of tarps as a form of origami!
Which brings me back to cordage and another benefitv of the 3mm size. I never know how I'll set up next so I do not pre set cord length as much as adjust as needed and joining 2 pieces of 3 mm to pull over a tree limb is easier than small diameter cord connected with hardware or knotted.

butthead
 
07/01/2020 11:08AM
A possible tip for ridgeline set, use prusiks to hold the loops at the tarp borders. This allows a tight set yet offers adjust-ability along the ridgeline.
Here I used figure eight clip to clip the ridgeline to the loops, but have more often just used the ridgeline thru the loops except fro the egdes which get prusiks for adjusting.

butthead
 
Zanzinger
senior member (71)senior membersenior member
 
07/01/2020 11:22AM
Argo: "Zanzinger: One other point - and perhaps Dan Cooke could speak to this - it is advantageous to run the ridgeline through the loops instead of under the tarp. This will prevent abrasion of the water repellent coating (promoting longevity) and also prevent water from running along the ridgeline rope and dripping under the tarp. This necessitates stringing your tarp through the loops before BEFORE you attach the second end of the ridgeline. "
Yeah the ridge line will be through the loops. Good call on the loop.

I’ll have to look into that Siberian knot.
 
unshavenman
distinguished member(1245)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/01/2020 01:53PM

I had shared these pics of my continuous ridgeline tarp setup in the previously referenced thread, but to answer the OP's question......
For me personally, in addition to my continuous ridgeline which is I believe 30 feet long, each of the corners and each of the sides has 20' hanks of Dan's CCS cord which stays affixed to the tarp. In addition, I carry about 180' feet of additional cordage in 10'-20' lengths to extend my reach if required, and for general camp use. Last week I was in the blow-down area around Kekekabic/Fraser/Thomas/Ima/Ensign and a couple times I had to extend my corner tie outs an additional twenty feet to get to trees.
While I use 1.75 mm UHMWPE (Zing-it!/Lash-it!) for my hammock fly, I only use Dan's 1/8" cord on my tarp. I know that the CCS cord will never fail me, but I'm not confident that 1.75 mm UHMWPE cord could withstand the tension I put on my tie-outs with a truckers hitch.
 
Papa09
distinguished member (170)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
07/01/2020 07:50PM
GearGuy: "Jackfish: "butthead: " "
The perfect tarp setup. Doesn't surprise me in the least that Butthead is the master tarp hanger. :)"

I don't see what's perfect about it. That's an insanely huge bag of absolutely unnecessary lengths of rope. he's effectively carrying the mass of 2 tarps just to hang one tarp. Just because you've been doing something a long time doesn't mean at all that you do it well. I appreciate the trail cred but at some point one must acknowledge the new school and how vastly superior it is...none of my rope stretches (at all, Lash It is KING), it's 1.75mm compared to his gigantic diameter paracord, and every single on of my tie outs, and ridgeline, fit inside the original tarp bag and don't add any noticeable bulk....

Might as well be using a sextant and compass out there rather than a GPS. Or clunky leather shoes for portage shoes lol!
"

Big talker with no pictures...
 
schweady
distinguished member(6916)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
07/03/2020 10:32AM
Papa09: "Big talker with no pictures..."
:-)
 
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