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Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Listening Point - General Discussion
      Rigging the canoe - before a tow?     

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07/20/2020 09:07AM  
Question for those who know the tow gig...my first one is coming up.

Normally I get to the EP and then gear up the canoe with painters, bailer, seat back, rod holders, and all those other things I don't want flapping around at 70mph...

Do you rig the canoe before the tow, or after?
 
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Minnesotian
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07/20/2020 09:24AM  

After. I treat the tow like the canoe is still riding on the top of my truck. Don't want anything flying off.
 
Banksiana
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07/20/2020 10:03AM  
I strap the paddles in the canoe as if preparing for a portage; removes the opportunity for damage of the paddles in the confines of the tow boat.
 
07/20/2020 10:29AM  
Canoe is non rigged.
 
07/20/2020 10:55AM  
No rigging
 
07/20/2020 12:33PM  
I strap in my seat back, (has velcro to keep it closed) and I strap my 2 poles in ( mine are up inside the thwarts so no banging on rack), I figure safer there than in big boat with packs and people hopping over gear. Don't forget Portage yoke if solo. I panicked once half way up the Sag corridor....yoke was hiding under packs. Paddles, map and camera in my hands.
 
07/20/2020 12:44PM  
Unrigged is how we went last year. I could see going with some stuff rigged but only if it's solid and completely inside the boat.
 
07/20/2020 04:10PM  
I have not been rigged the few times I used a tow.
 
AdamXChicago
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07/20/2020 04:43PM  
Rigged after tow
 
07/20/2020 04:53PM  
My painters stay on. They're BDB'd to the decks and there's no risk of them coming loose.
 
07/20/2020 08:47PM  
Thanks all - clear direction, appreciate the insights.
 
KarlBAndersen1
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07/21/2020 06:22AM  
I have it rigged to the degree I would carry it on a portage - painters strapped in, seats attached.
 
07/22/2020 11:48AM  
We had an outfitter tow two canoes on a large lake in NW Ontario which we kept loaded with all our gear. There was not room for four paddlers, the tow boat operator and much of our gear in the tow boat. The tow was about 17 miles. We tied in gear in the canoes as much as possible. The most important thing was rigging the two canoes as parallel to each other as possible while leaving a sufficient gap between the canoes so they did not ship water. The tow went well and although somewhat costly saved us an entire day of paddling into the wind.
 
07/22/2020 01:17PM  
Yep... all that stuff is tied into the canoe and secure... painters, rods, rod holders, seat backs or cushions, bailer, sometimes paddle and locator but usually not. If it makes it down the road at 55 mph, it will survive the tow at 15 mph.
 
07/22/2020 03:49PM  
deerfoot: "We had an outfitter tow two canoes on a large lake in NW Ontario which we kept loaded with all our gear. There was not room for four paddlers, the tow boat operator and much of our gear in the tow boat. The tow was about 17 miles. We tied in gear in the canoes as much as possible. The most important thing was rigging the two canoes as parallel to each other as possible while leaving a sufficient gap between the canoes so they did not ship water. The tow went well and although somewhat costly saved us an entire day of paddling into the wind."


I think most of us are talking about a "tow" where canoes are on an overhead rack on the towboat.
 
07/23/2020 09:26PM  
cowdoc: "deerfoot: "We had an outfitter tow two canoes on a large lake in NW Ontario which we kept loaded with all our gear. There was not room for four paddlers, the tow boat operator and much of our gear in the tow boat. The tow was about 17 miles. We tied in gear in the canoes as much as possible. The most important thing was rigging the two canoes as parallel to each other as possible while leaving a sufficient gap between the canoes so they did not ship water. The tow went well and although somewhat costly saved us an entire day of paddling into the wind."



I think most of us are talking about a "tow" where canoes are on an overhead rack on the towboat.
"


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