BWCA Triple wall exit pipe...? Boundary Waters Winter Camping and Activities
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12/09/2021 04:01PM  
Doing my first hot tent trip in a couple of weeks. Wondering how many of you allow your bare flue to make contact with your stovejack? Winnerwell STRONGLY suggests using their triple wall pipe section for the exit point, but I am looking for others' experience on this topic.

Also under consideration is the silicone stove jack for a tight fit right to the flue.

I guess I am a bit nervous because the first time I burned my new stove with the damper open and the feeder door open that pipe was RED HOT. I know I won't ever burn it like that again, but I just want to make sure that I am not going to be scorched alive in a few weeks.

My tent has a a heat/flame resistant stove jack with a 5" opening. I have a 3.5" pipe.

My other idea was to wrap the flue with coarse steel wool to keep it centered, disperse heat, and limit the amount of heat loss to the tent.

What does everyone else do?
 
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12/09/2021 05:52PM  
I run a single wall pipe thru a heat-resistant stove jack. It's about a 3" pipe thru a 5" opening. I don't consider a tight fit necessary. You want a bit of ventilation in your tent anyway.

Temperature regulation in your tent is a learned skill. The tendency early is to overheat and have wild fluctuations... it's cold outside and you don't want to be cold. So the stove is too hot and the tent door is open. Flames shoot out your stack and you waste wood. Warm and steady is your goal. Watch your wood, tend your stove, regulate your damper and adjust your stove vent. You have lots of tools to regulate temperature.
Minnesotian
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12/10/2021 08:05AM  
bobbernumber3: "I run a single wall pipe thru a heat-resistant stove jack. It's about a 3" pipe thru a 5" opening. I don't consider a tight fit necessary. You want a bit of ventilation in your tent anyway.


Temperature regulation in your tent is a learned skill. The tendency early is to overheat and have wild fluctuations... it's cold outside and you don't want to be cold. So the stove is too hot and the tent door is open. Flames shoot out your stack and you waste wood. Warm and steady is your goal. Watch your wood, tend your stove, regulate your damper and adjust your stove vent. You have lots of tools to regulate temperature."


Bobber hit it pretty much on the nail head. My single wall stove pipe directly contacts the heat-resistant stove jack, its a pretty tight fit actually. I have never had any issue with the fabric catching fire. However, my Snowtrekker comes with a canvas flap that can be let down to cover the stove jackhole when not in use. That flap has some cotton ties for when the cover is rolled up. Those ties have sat directly on the pipe and the very tips of the ties, where there are loose threads a bit, has charred over many years of use.

When the stove is going, and you are awake, any issues from an overheated fire can be dealt with. My only suggestion is to not run the stove while you are asleep. Bring sleeping bags/pads that will comfortably get you through the night.

Also, if you don't have one already, I suggest getting a stove thermometer. Something like this: Magnetic Stove Thermometer This really helps on regulating tent heat. A lot of the time I will see the temperature in the stove falling but havn't felt it yet in the tent. This thing helps you keep an eye on a regular tent temperature.

Have a good time!
12/10/2021 10:14AM  
Good point Minnesotian, about the cotton flap ties.

I asked for a stove thermometer for Christmas a few years back. This is what I got stove thermometer . I like being able to check temperatures on various spot on the stove, tent sidewalls, chili reheating on the stove, etc.
12/10/2021 11:42AM  
I also don’t worry much about my single wall stove pipe touching the fireproof gasket on my Snowtrekker. I usually try to line my pipe up so it’s not touching (there is about 1/4 inch or so open around the pipe), but it never stays where I put it. Invariably the wind moves the pipe or the snow under the stove melts and my pipe is leaning against the gasket. It has never been an issue and I don’t worry about it, but I never run my stove at red hot. I do fill my stove up full of wood just before going to bed, but damper it down so it’s just barely burning. If burning BWCA a wood it usually burns for about 2-3 hours, adding just a little heat to the tent.

I am not familiar with Winnerwell stoves, and more importantly I don’t know what type of fireproof gasket you have on your tent? I have confidence in mine, but Snowtrekker makes their own and has a huge amount of field experience with them. For any other gasket, I can’t say how confident I would be.

Bobber and Minnesotan - how old are your Snowtrekkers? Mine is about 7 or 8 years, I do not have any little flap straps. My Jack cover is held on with Velcro, and comes completely off. Wondering if your tents are older or newer?
Minnesotian
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12/10/2021 12:24PM  

Oh, mine is plenty old. I got it off Craig'sList about 10 years ago now and it was old then. It's door is a big flap, not zippered like the new ones. The door also has ties to roll up the flap when going in and out frequently.

Your question actually prompted me to go in the basement where it is stored and pull it out to take a photo of it's manufacturing tag:
12/10/2021 12:26PM  
Thanks for the input guys. I do plan to burn through the night in Utah, but I am a pretty light sleeper and plan to check on it while it is dampered down throughout the night. I think I am just overthinking it a bit. I will let you all know how it goes.
12/10/2021 02:04PM  
bumabu: "....I do plan to burn through the night in Utah...."

I don't think camping in Utah makes it necessary to burn your stove all night. If you are concerned about temperature, I'd recommend a warmer sleeping bag. If you are good at cribbage, make the loser start the fire in the morning.
12/10/2021 03:13PM  
bobbernumber3: "bumabu: "....I do plan to burn through the night in Utah...."


I don't think camping in Utah makes it necessary to burn your stove all night. If you are concerned about temperature, I'd recommend a warmer sleeping bag. If you are good at cribbage, make the loser start the fire in the morning."


LOL, if it was just me I would not, but I am going to do my best to have wife and three kids enjoy sleeping in a tent when it's 20 degrees outside, and unfortunately, none of them play cribbage...
Dan Cooke
Guest Paddler
 
12/10/2021 03:38PM  
Use a infrared thermometer to see what temperatures you are experiencing.
all the data below is for specific materials- it can vary some from manufacturer to manufacturer.
Cotton Chars at 308°F
Nylon Begins to melt at 380°
Silicon coated Fiberglass- Welding blanket 600°F

I have used this to gauge temps on the stove and on the flue and materials around the tent/ stove
Dan Cooke
Guest Paddler
 
01/04/2022 10:52AM  
I ended up just leaving the pipe alone and not trying to mitigate it contacting the exit point. With 30 mile per hour winds at some points (glad I had the pipe properly guy lined out!) it would have been impossible to control anyway. I tried not to let the pipe get red hot for more than a minute while a new log was igniting, and would then damper it down. We burned the stove all night, every night. I had to set an alarm and get up every two hours to feed it logs, but it was worth it for everyone's comfort level. Thanks for all the feedback prior to the trip!
Minnesotian
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01/04/2022 11:12AM  

Thanks for the update. How do you like that tent? How is the construction on it? I have heard mixed reviews on it.
01/04/2022 06:20PM  
Great looking campsite and tent set up. Thanks for reporting back - I’d be glad if more people did that.
01/04/2022 06:55PM  
bumabu: " I tried not to let the pipe get red hot for more than a minute while a new log was igniting, and would then...."

A red hot pipe is too hot at any time, IMO. Risky and dangerous.
01/06/2022 02:04PM  
Minnesotian: "
Thanks for the update. How do you like that tent? How is the construction on it? I have heard mixed reviews on it. "


I love the tent. We bought it to hold my daughters 10th birthday in, and a stove was part of my negotiation. The construction seems really solid to be honest. We had upwards of 30 mph winds in Zion and it handled them like a champ. rain and snow almost every day and never saw a single leak. I really like it for car camping. Its size and weight are a lot (16' diameter, and about 80 pounds dry).

The stove is really great too, cant say enough good things about it.
 
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