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torpedo
member (37)member
 
03/22/2010 08:47PM
Has anyone used this rain gear? Checked it out at sports store, is very light wieght seems would be easy to pack/carry. Also, what is the best water bottle to get? Finally, everyone's thoughts on filtering water or not.

Thanks for any info
 
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03/22/2010 09:19PM
I love my Frogg Toggs. LIghtweight, fairly breathable and definitely keeps me dry. Highly recommend.

I use the Sweetwater filter on shore but go out into the center of the lake and just dip the Nalgenes in the water.
 
Appolion
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
03/23/2010 03:45AM
I have a set of the driducts and think they're pretty good. I only use the pants since I bought a goretex jacket. They're really cheap ($25?) and really light. Bought em at Gander Mt.
 
gacoleman
distinguished member (173)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 06:18AM
The Frogg Toggs/Driducks seem to be pretty good for the money. Haven't had the chance to see how they perform during a rain and while doing some sort of exercise. Couple things that I've heard (can't atest to their veracity, and don't want to experiment with mine), don't get too close to a fire as they will melt just from the heat and ditto if deet preparations are applied directly to them. Maybe others can comment.
As far as filtering, last time up we didn't. But we did paddle off shore a couple hundred yards. If getting water at the shore line, then I would filter. I've been told the wave action keeps the giardia and crypto stirred up and going off shore it settles to the bottom so the water is less likely to be tainted with those two. Not sure about the moose tapeworm eggs. Hiked Isle Royale last year and filtered everything. Chemical treatment doesn't kill the eggs and I doubt that steripen would either.
 
03/23/2010 07:08AM
Our whole group used frogg toggs and found them to work well to keep the rain out. The jacket was pretty good at keeping the heat in as well. They do tend to rip fairly easily. Especially in the crotch:

 
03/23/2010 07:13AM
Forgot to add that the crotch rip (and any rip) was fairly easily repaired with duct tape. Don't have a picture of the crotch repair...and don't think it'd be appropriate for this "G" rated site! :)

I bought a set at a local outdoor type store for $9.99! You could buy dozens of sets of these for the price of some rain jackets!
 
Unas10
distinguished member(1322)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 08:25AM
quote drnatus: "Forgot to add that the crotch rip (and any rip) was fairly easily repaired with duct tape."

Gynecology or proctology is your specialty right?

Duct tape repairs from a doctor, welcome to the new Obamacare;)
 
K2
distinguished member (183)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 09:14AM
I have taken the DryDucks on two trips, new pair each time, they work alright but rip easily in any kind of thick stuff and both years I tore the crotch out of them the first time I wore them. They were easily repaired with some duct tape. My opinion they keep rain out and pack easily you just might need a new pair after each trip but they are cheap enough to do that.
 
Zwater
distinguished member (447)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 09:21AM
I have used both Driducks and Frogg Toggs, and Frogg Toggs are much better. Driducks rip very easily. Like K2 said you will probably need a new set of DriDucks every trip. However, I love my Frogg Toogs. There are very durable, lightweight, and can pack down very easily.
 
gunflintguy
senior member (55)senior membersenior member
 
03/23/2010 10:28AM
I have heard the froggtoggs and brushy portages don't get along...lots of grabbing...is this true?
 
Leftowitz
Guest Paddler
 
03/23/2010 12:53PM
Another option that seems like the same or similiar material is Stearns Eco-dry. 1/3 of the price seems worth checking on to me. But to be sure I'd probably wear them closer to home in some storms before taking an untrusted item in the bwca.
 
mc2mens
distinguished member(3322)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 01:05PM
My 2 cents: I don't think you should skimp on rain gear. I've seen the frogg toggs and wouldn't take them on a canoe/camping trip. Sure, they're light and cheap, but that does you no good if they tear on a portage and you're getting wet. In my book, your raingear should be some of the best gear you carry with you, not the cheapest gear.
 
nojobro
distinguished member(6880)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/23/2010 01:07PM
Not sure about the water bottle. I suspect it's just user preference. Last time we had along three SIGG bottles.

We filter all our water, and try to still get water a tad away from shore just to cut down on the amt. of times that the filter will need cleaning (we have a ceramic filter). We use a pre-filter, too (just a coffee filter wrapped over the intake) except for a couple times when we got it from shore and boiled it. I know a lot of people drink directly from the lake, but picking up a nasty intestinal bug is not my idea of a good time, so we filter.
 
mc2mens
distinguished member(3322)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 01:09PM
Regarding your other two questions:

Water bottles: I use camelback and nalgene water bottles.
Filtering: No question - filter your water.
 
bpneiman
distinguished member (132)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 01:19PM
I like Frogg Toggs, but wouldn't say they are great. Not a big fan of the elastic wrist and ankle cuffs. Wore them in a torrential downpour at a football game and all the water ran into my shoes. The surface will also get frayed after a while especially in the knees.

That being said it is the only jacket I bring up to the bdub. They make for a nice windbreaker, pack small and are very light. When not camping they are always tucked under the seat of my vehicle.
 
PINETREE
distinguished member(12016)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/23/2010 03:33PM
They work good if it does not rain. Get something a little more durable. Unless its 90 degrees out and you don't mine getting wet when they rip.
 
spankatolla
distinguished member (248)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 05:02PM
I love my frog toggs. I think they work very well in the rain, except during a torrential down pour. I will agree with the getting to close to the fire comment. Mine have a few holes in them. And my pants are toast, but what I put them through, no rain gear would have endured.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12788)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/23/2010 08:03PM
I got my first pair this winter at the sports show in St Paul. Yes they might not be the $200 goretex with all the pockets and zippers, but for $40 you cannot beat the price. No worries if I get too close to the fire, just get another pair. They should last 4-5 trips.
 
Pikehunter
senior member (99)senior membersenior member
 
03/23/2010 08:51PM
I've had my frogg toggs for 3 years now .
Lightweight and do keep me dry. They do not like sparks from the campfire.
 
jb in the wild
distinguished member(2651)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/23/2010 10:14PM
quote drnatus: "Our whole group used frogg toggs and found them to work well to keep the rain out. The jacket was pretty good at keeping the heat in as well. They do tend to rip fairly easily. Especially in the crotch:


"


We used them last year(dri ducks) ripped the crouch out, all 4 of us.drnatus you have earned your stripes as we called it.

I've upgraded to Frog Toggs better built,50 buck at Gander MT. They don't pack down as well as DriDucks. I'll find out how well they hold up in May.

JB
 
snakecharmer
distinguished member(6498)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/23/2010 11:00PM
quote jb in the wild: "quote drnatus: "Our whole group used frogg toggs and found them to work well to keep the rain out. The jacket was pretty good at keeping the heat in as well. They do tend to rip fairly easily. Especially in the crotch:



"



We used them last year ripped the crouch out, all 4 of us.drnatus you have earned your stripes as we called it.


I've upgraded to Frog Toggs better built,50 buck at Gander MT. They don't pack down as well as DriDucks. I'll find out how well they hold up in May.


JB"


Wow! 4 for 4!?! That's not good.
 
Wallidave
distinguished member(874)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/24/2010 10:36AM
I've had a pair since 2004. Since I also wear them at work(railroading) their pretty beat up now. The main reason I like them is because their so light and easy to pack. For rain their ok definitely not great. Still keep out a light rain after 6 years. But don't like the way there's no pocket liners on the pants the water will drain right down into the pockets getting your pants wet. Maybe the newer ones are made with pocket liners? Was expecting them to be a little more breathable but still work up a sweat pretty easily in them. Even just standing still my arms will feel clammy.

Dave
 
Lemieux
distinguished member (447)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2010 01:27AM
If you like to struggle with the elements then buy Frog Togs but IMO rain gear is worth it's weight and gold. Trust me if you have rain for days you'll know what I mean.

Spend the extra $$ or learn the hard way.

+++ VS ------------- = ?
 
jb in the wild
distinguished member(2651)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2010 06:04AM
quote snakecharmer: "quote jb in the wild: "quote drnatus: "Our whole group used frogg toggs and found them to work well to keep the rain out. The jacket was pretty good at keeping the heat in as well. They do tend to rip fairly easily. Especially in the crotch:



"




We used them last year ripped the crouch out, all 4 of us.drnatus you have earned your stripes as we called it.



I've upgraded to Frog Toggs better built,50 buck at Gander MT. They don't pack down as well as DriDucks. I'll find out how well they hold up in May.



JB"



Wow! 4 for 4!?! That's not good."


snakecharmer We're just a bunch of fatasses walking in the woods.
 
jeroldharter
distinguished member(1515)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2010 08:46AM
I have had a few sets of Frogg Toggs - that should say something.

The pants fray easily and look like cotton balls pulling loose from the membrane but that is no big deal. They are completely waterproof and help a lot in the wind. I took a pair of pants to Quetico for a fly in base camp trip last June and wore them all the time. They helped keep me warm and dry. They are sized large so that other clothes fit easily underneath but some would protest the dirigible look. And they are very cheap so that you could just bring a spare set of pants if the first pair had a blow out. They weigh less than the roll of duct tape.

On the down side, the zippers are cheap. The hood on the jacket is not very form fitting and can be a nuisance. The pants tear easily and are not suitable for bushwacking. The seam in the crotch will blow out. The inside of the material is slightly tacky so it will "snag" if you try to put the pants on over boots (I ripped a pair that way). Also, the elastic ankles are rather tight and hard to get over some boots like Mukboots.

I like them for sitting in the boat/canoe. I don't care if they get pike or muskie slime on them but would not want to spice up my Gore-Tex pants that way. They are good to have as insurance in the summer when I don't have my fancy rain gear on hand. I keep a couple of pairs in the boat including a pair for a the chance friend.

So overall they are good but I would not rely on them in BWCA trips.
 
mwd1976
distinguished member(951)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2010 09:39AM
I used to buy gear to "get by" but after the third time buying the same item, it isn't so cheap anymore.

If you need to bring a back up pair, is it even cheap any more? Keep an eye out on steepandcheap and the outlet site of REI and Backcountry. by looking out for deals, I was able to get a nice go-lite gortex shell and some nice columbia titanium pants for a total of about $70. They have lasted 8 trips to the bwca, an Alaska trip, Yellowstone, etc. and they still look like new. I also wear them x-country skiing and snowshoeing in the winter.

Rain gear is something worth spending some money on, but you don't have to spend $200 if you look carefully.
 
Patches the Canoe
distinguished member (288)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/28/2010 08:46PM
I've used them but they do tear... a few years back I finally sprung for good Gortex gear and I love it, just take care of it. For years I'd spend $20-30 a year on low cost stuff, I bet I'm about been paid broke even.

My teammates always packed grunions, which I have to admit are heavy duty accent on the "heavy" but they do work well too.
 
Ozarker
distinguished member(761)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/28/2010 10:27PM
I just looked up the Frog Toggs on the BassPro website. The reviews for the rainsuits were not good for them. Most complained about their durability and several said that they didn't keep the rain out at all. I think it averaged barely 3.0 out of 5.0 for 40 or so reviews. Best compliment was that they were light.
 
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