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TrekScouter
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11/10/2011 12:52PM
Until now, I've used a Eureka Timberline on my BWCA trips. The Taj3 and similar designs look like a nice alternative, but I'm concerned about the mesh ceiling panels that do not zip closed. Is this a problem while setting up in the rain? In other words, does the interior get wet before you get the rainfly in place? If so, how do you solve this problem?
 
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11/10/2011 01:10PM
I have a Timberline SQ which has mesh on the upper sides as well.

If it's raining, I pitch a tarp first then put up the tent. If the tarp isn't where I want the tent, it gets moved once the fly is up. Otherwise the tarp gets taken down & moved once the tent has been set up.
 
spottedowl
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11/10/2011 01:24PM
same with me - put up the tarp, build tent under tarp, move tent and stake down
 
HikingStick
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11/10/2011 01:48PM
If you don't carry a tarp, sure, the tent can get wet. If it's a light rain, and you have a tent that sets up quick, you can probably get it up before it gets too wet.

If early enough in the day (and warm enough), what makes it in will evaporate off. If in cool weather, use your camp towl or a spare shirt to dry things up. If you're in the middle of a downpour, it's a different story--you will take on water.

If in a heavy downpour, you will take on water. Aside from a tarp, if your site is roomy enough (or your tent small enough), you could set up under a some trees and move the tent after the fly is over the top.
 
HowardSprague
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11/10/2011 01:51PM
What spottedowl said.
 
talusman
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11/10/2011 02:11PM
Without tarp you can pitch tent and then lay in the "Innie". That will give you a dry area to sleep.
 
vinnie
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11/10/2011 02:44PM
My msr hubba hubba, you can set up the rainfly first then the tent
 
11/10/2011 03:27PM
quote vinnie: "My msr hubba hubba, you can set up the rainfly first then the tent"

That is also a good suggestion. My Timberline has that ability as well.
 
11/10/2011 04:11PM
Saw this above.
I also will set up a tarp over the tent pad if it is raining hard enough and then set up my tent. Then move the tarp. Or set up the tarp and then do the tent under it and move the tent. My old Kelty is nearly all mesh/screen at the top 1/3 or so. I set it up in the rain one time. That was enough.
I have also left a tarp over the entire tent in some good hard rains.
 
PineKnot
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11/10/2011 05:42PM
What the others have said. Except if it's not too late, set up the tarp and just wait for the rain to stop. Then set up the tent.
 
tonyyarusso
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11/10/2011 06:44PM
My tent uses the little plastic hooks to attach the tent fabric to the poles, rather than needing to push them through sleeves, and can be set up without the tent as footprint and fly only. This means that I can set it up as footprint and fly first, then crawl in under the fly and set up the tent portion from the inside. It's a bit awkward to do that way, but it does work.

The simpler approach would be to have one of those super-towels on hand and just try off the inside after you're set up.
 
kanoes
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11/10/2011 07:27PM
if its raining i always opt for the "tarp up first" option. i do like a front porch to sit under too.



 
Sierra1
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11/10/2011 07:33PM
quote kanoes: "if its raining i always opt for the "tarp up first" option. i do like a front porch to sit under too."



"


That's the same thing I do. I like the porch to sit under and stay dry.
 
11/10/2011 09:11PM
quote tonyyarusso: "My tent uses the little plastic hooks to attach the tent fabric to the poles, rather than needing to push them through sleeves, and can be set up without the tent as footprint and fly only. This means that I can set it up as footprint and fly first, then crawl in under the fly and set up the tent portion from the inside. It's a bit awkward to do that way, but it does work.


The simpler approach would be to have one of those super-towels on hand and just try off the inside after you're set up."


I used to use a SD Clip Flashlight that I would just lay the fly over the tent body while I clipped the tent to the poles at each end and then I'd stake everything out. A little more awkward than normal, but not bad considering the alternative.
 
11/10/2011 09:16PM
quote Sierra1: "quote kanoes: "if its raining i always opt for the "tarp up first" option. i do like a front porch to sit under too."



"



That's the same thing I do. I like the porch to sit under and stay dry. "


That's one of the things that makes the CCS lean shelters interesting to me - having that built-in awning.
 
Mort
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11/10/2011 09:41PM
I will usually wait until the rain slows down, then I work fast with another person's help.
I pull out the four corners of the tent and drape the fly over the tent, allowing it to shelter the tent from the rain as we put up the frame and draw it upward. Using the fly in this manner actually does a pretty good job of keeping the innards of the tent quite dry.
 
wetcanoedog
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11/10/2011 11:12PM
this is where my Baker Shelter really earns it's keep.if it's raining i'll get it up,sometimes any old way,to get under cover.inside with both my packs and day bag i can settle in until the rain lets up.i only use the tent to sleep in so there is no need to pitch it right away and the Baker go's up fast with just a couple lines.when i was using just a tent,Timberline,i worked fast and found i could toss the rain cover over the main body while i was still putting poles together.same with the Eureka Rising Sun i used for many years.it was self standing with bug netting sides and a door without a nylon cover just netting.i got a Baker from Eureka and could get it up and assemble the Rising Sun under the Bakers door flap and carry it over to where i wanted it,small tents are handy that way.my Atko has the rain cover attached to the inside so i don't have that hassle now which is great for the really small camp sites i like to use where there is no room for the shelter..or..those huge open ones i have got stuck in a few times where the trees are so far apart i can't run lines to them and hold up the Baker.
sometimes you can't really keep %100 dry and just have to wait for body heat and a wash cloth to dry things out..
this is where knowing your gear pays off,if you can pitch without any confusion because you have practiced with a new tent,many times,at home and if you need to marked parts and flaps and such with tape to help match them up fast then you will stay drier than standing around in a downpour trying to get all that fabric right side up and turned the right way.
 
andym
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11/11/2011 01:00AM
I like talusman's point. Nice and simple.

On our tarptent Hogback the mesh inner tent just hangs from the fly and so it stays dry even if setting up in the rain. Sort of nice.

But really, I just prefer to go the 10 days it doesn't rain. But I'm not telling you all when that is or it will get too crowded. :)
 
BWPaddler
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11/11/2011 10:40AM
quote andym: "But really, I just prefer to go the 10 days it doesn't rain. But I'm not telling you all when that is or it will get too crowded. :)"
There ya go!!

+1 or +4 or whatever to those who say Tarp First... but in reality, haven't needed to do that in a long long time - knock on wood. Even when it was pouring on us last May, I was able to get Timberline set up during a lull. Wasn't worried about a few sprinkles and it only took 5 minutes or so.
 
11/11/2011 01:23PM
Lean1+ set up fast as a tarp, cooked lunch and assembled camp gear in the rain. Then pulled in and down for sleeping after I decided to stay.
Very handy shelter, like WCD's Baker Shelter. Big thing I like is that I can get fully packed under the lean, then pull it down and pack it last!

I also have a few tents that lend their use to setting up the fly then the inside body,

butthead
 
11/11/2011 07:41PM
My Exped and Hilleberger tents all have the body attached to the fly so they do not get the inside wet when setting up. One benefit of the European tents.

 
11/12/2011 08:07AM
What kinda idiot would go campin' in the RAIN?? hahahahahahahahaha
 
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