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      Snowshoes wood or other preferred?     

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PINETREE
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10/27/2012 09:20PM
I have one pair of wood snowshoes in the Michigan style at 14 x 48 inch and two aluminum one is Atlas 10(might be 9) x 33 and a 10 x 36 inch.
I prefer the aluminum ones now because of the way superior binding.You can twist and jump and those snowshoes stay on. But I think my old web shoes have better floatation. Your opinion?
 
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tonyyarusso
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10/27/2012 10:20PM
Maybe just upgrade the bindings on the wood ones?
10/27/2012 10:22PM
quote PINETREE: "I have one pair of wood snowshoes in the Michigan style at 14 x 48 inch and two aluminum one is Atlas 10(might be 9) x 33 and a 10 x 36 inch.
I prefer the aluminum ones now because of the way superior binding.You can twist and jump and those snowshoes stay on. But I think my old web shoes have better floatation. Your opinion?"


i only have aluminum/modern shoes but the larger surface area of most traditional shoes provides more floatation. if you are interested in parting with the michigans i might be interested in taking them off your hands.

tg
jwartman59
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10/28/2012 01:15AM
i love my vintage quebec made snowshoes.






i am sure that the new fangled models are far superior. no doubt. i just like the feel of wood, i like the tradition.

i have to admit walking a mile in these suckers is super painful, and very slow. but that is what snowshoeing is about. if you want easy, skis beat the heck out of snowshoes hands down.
PINETREE
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10/28/2012 07:26AM
quote tg: "quote PINETREE: "I have one pair of wood snowshoes in the Michigan style at 14 x 48 inch and two aluminum one is Atlas 10(might be 9) x 33 and a 10 x 36 inch.
I prefer the aluminum ones now because of the way superior binding.You can twist and jump and those snowshoes stay on. But I think my old web shoes have better floatation. Your opinion?"



i only have aluminum/modern shoes but the larger surface area of most traditional shoes provides more floatation. if you are interested in parting with the michigans i might be interested in taking them off your hands.


tg"

Thanks, but had them for 40 years and we had to many fun times together.
PINETREE
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10/28/2012 07:28AM
quote jwartman59: "i love my vintage quebec made snowshoes.







i am sure that the new fangled models are far superior. no doubt. i just like the feel of wood, i like the tradition.


i have to admit walking a mile in these suckers is super painful, and very slow. but that is what snowshoeing is about. if you want easy, skis beat the heck out of snowshoes hands down."


That's what I call the Michigan style. I am sure in Canada they have there own name-Quebec.
ArrowheadPaddler
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10/28/2012 08:45AM
I usually use wooden snowshoes, because that's all I own. With the large surface area, they definitely provide better floatation. However, I often borrow my brother's or friends' aluminum snowshoes. They are much better on packed trails, ice, hillsides, and tight spaces. There isn't an aluminum snowshoe, however, that matches the floatation of wood.
PINETREE
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10/28/2012 09:11AM
What we need is a hybred.The new bindings are far superior and more efficient to the old bindings. I use to get rubber from inner tubes from the iron mining in the 70's and they were good. The rubber bindings you buy now stretch each time you take a step.
10/28/2012 03:26PM
I am traditionalist, or maybe I'm just old but I prefer wood.
PINETREE
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10/28/2012 05:12PM
quote walllee: "I am traditionalist, or maybe I'm just old but I prefer wood."

tradition is good. What binding do you have on your shoes?
tonyyarusso
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10/28/2012 05:27PM
PINETREE
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10/28/2012 06:23PM
quote tonyyarusso: " Modified "H" Bindings "

If in neoprene,that should help in preventing stretch. Does the strap come of the back heel at all.Looks pretty secure otherwise.

Gosh I love talking snowshoes and winter,I am getting goosebumps.
tonyyarusso
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10/28/2012 07:37PM
They've always stayed on for me - the rubber of the sole being slightly wider than the leather is plenty to hold it in place.
10/28/2012 07:39PM
quote PINETREE: "quote walllee: "I am traditionalist, or maybe I'm just old but I prefer wood."


tradition is good. What binding do you have on your shoes?"
Cabelas heavy duty bindings.
10/28/2012 08:45PM
I've got wood shoes and have tried the metal. I prefer the wood.
ZaraSp00k
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10/29/2012 09:56AM
wood for me too
I have shoed with many with aluminum and see no reason to change

I have a pear of Michigan-Huron-whatever you want to call them
and a pair of Green Mtn

although the bindings work well, if i take them off and try to put them on in the field they don't work so well, so would like to update the bindings if i ever see something I like
PINETREE
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10/29/2012 10:05AM
Also I noticed as far as floatation I think length makes more difference than width. Of coarse you have to have a ultimate of both. You notice most traditional snowshoes are at least 48 inches long. About 36 inches is max in the new shoes.
Cedarboy
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10/29/2012 03:43PM
I have metal ones but am looking to make some wooden ones.
CB
ZaraSp00k
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10/30/2012 09:38AM
has anyone seen a DIY binding?
I checked the DIY forum, nothing there

bindings are so expensive for what they are
if I could think of a design I'm sure it could be built much cheaper than commercial

anybody who has built your own shoes, what did you do for bindings?
10/30/2012 11:27PM
I've come up with a hybrid rubber binding that is similar to the triangular-slide your boot in and go type made out of inner tubes. The toe section has a double layer of rubber to keep it more secure while you can still stretch the back over the heel. I'll try to post some pics tomorrow. They are made out of old truck inner tubes from a local tire shop.
10/31/2012 02:22AM
trads excel with floatation but a lot of the modern shoes (with incorporated crampons) will outperform them on really steep terrain. a portage i have crossed quite a few times on winter ice fishing trips is NOT crossable without crampons...or a snowmobile;)

tg
arctic
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10/31/2012 11:53AM
I have and use both. Although the big Ojibwes have more floatation on deep, powdery snow, I still prefer the aluminum/neprene/crampon combo due to their versatility on steep portages, ability to take a soaking on slush without damage, and packability on the dogsled.
ArrowheadPaddler
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11/01/2012 06:35AM
quote ZaraSp00k: "has anyone seen a DIY binding?
I checked the DIY forum, nothing there


bindings are so expensive for what they are
if I could think of a design I'm sure it could be built much cheaper than commercial


anybody who has built your own shoes, what did you do for bindings?"


You can make lampwick bindings. I have never actually tried this, but it looks like it would be easy to do:

Lampwick Bindings
Pinetree
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12/24/2019 11:36AM
Bumped: I love talk about snowshoe styles and efficiency Snowshoes remind you of times gone by also.

floatation
Jaywalker
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12/26/2019 06:53PM
I’ve got a good old pair or Ojibwes that I made and really like. I’ve thought of making a pair of larger Alaskans, but never seem to get to it.
ZaraSp00k
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12/27/2019 08:44AM
from what I have seen, the question is no longer wood or metal (AL), it is wood or poymer, there are some really interesting space age (wouldn't metal be considered WWII era technology?) snow shoes, here is one:
snowshoe

I also saw another but cannot remember the name, I believe they are made in this area
Campcraft
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12/27/2019 09:26AM
snowshoes

I like these. Lightweight and quiet with great flotation. If I am camping with someone using the modern style I tend to fall back or forge ahead so I don't have to listen to all of that squeaking plastic and aluminum.
Pinetree
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12/27/2019 10:26AM
Campcraft: " snowshoes


I like these. Lightweight and quiet with great flotation. If I am camping with someone using the modern style I tend to fall back or forge ahead so I don't have to listen to all of that squeaking plastic and aluminum. "


I do like the rachet system they show,my biggest concern with wood recently is the harness setup is usually far inferior to a good quality metal-plastic top snowshoe. Rubber straps stretch while walking. Leather,I never could get snug enought.
Its about time a equal harness for wood is available-I think.
Yes wood has more flotation but usually less manueverable(sp). Wood looks is hard to beat. I do have the Atlas 1033 snowshoes-I had for 10 years-real reliable and can turn on a dime or climb anything, Yes they sink a little more and they are pretty quite. Not wood quite.
Pinetree
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02/08/2020 06:34PM
I have noticed it seems like some of the new shoes your too far forward for flat snow areas and you sink in the front part of the snowshoe and the back half seems like it is not helping floatation(sp) much.

To get good floatation(sp) you need a combo of length and width for best results. That is why some of the old-wood snowshoes you float so much better.
hamingredient
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02/12/2020 02:03PM
I've owned and used several different models of modern snowshoes from Tubbs, Redfeather and Atlas. They're great for traction and stability, and some of those bindings are really well designed to fit a wide variety of winter boots... but not my mukluks. I like them in the Colorado Rockies with insulated hiking boots.

I also own a fairly large pair of Ojibwa style snowshoes that I laced up myself from a Wilcox & Williams kit about 15 years ago. They turned out beautifully and they work exceptionally well in deep, powdery snow on wide open spaces. I have "Super A" bindings on those, which play nicely with Steger muks.

Most recently, I purchased a pair of large Bearpaws from Lure of the North, which are laced with 400 lb. monofilament fishing line. I used them last weekend with lampwick bindings on Lake One and Lake Two, pulling a toboggan over fresh snow. They were great in the trees and scrub, gathering firewood.

Is there a "best snowshoe"? Maybe, but I haven't found it yet. Different shoes for different trails, I think.

And I've confirmed what the experts have told us; floatation is a function of size. The larger the snowshoe, the less you sink in with every step. There's no way around that!

Shape is important, too. Last weekend as we were trudging across the flats, hauling loaded toboggans, I found myself wishing I'd brought my Ojibwas for their ability to ride up out of the snow with every step. And I wished my camping partner hadn't worn his MSRs -- they plunged deep and their narrow profile left a challenging track for my wider, traditional bearpaws to navigate as I followed. My buddy cursed his narrow shoes too, and they swore right back at him with squeaks and creaks and clickety-clacks -- yes, the traditional styles are blessedly quieter!

Next BWCA trip, I'll bring two pairs of snowshoes; the Ojibwas for the trail, and the bearpaws for everything else!

Pinetree
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02/13/2020 01:06PM
Nice write.
I have both a 30 and 36 atlas snowshoes and both are the same for distance of center foot where it pivots underneath to front of snowehoe(like 9.5 inches) much to front heavy. You sink down in front with back of snowshoe really not help spread the weight.
I have a 50 year old pair of Michigan style web 14 x 48 inch and center of foot pivot foot to front like 17 inches. Old style floats so much better.

Tried both atlas pairs on a snowy meadow and sunk terrible. Put my E109 Fischer skiis on and floated on top( 80 x 3.6 inches) so been using my skiis even in the woods.
bwcamjh
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02/16/2020 09:25AM
Have three pair of wood and 2 modern pairs of snowshoes.

I like the wood. All my wood snowshoes have Super A bindings. I have found they get the job done with various kinds of footwear.

My newest modern snowshoes have a ratchet style binding, I find them easy to get in and out of.

Which snowshoes I use on any given adventure depends on where I'm going, terrain, how long, how much carried in a pack, how much room in the vehicle, snow conditions, so forth.



Bushpilot
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02/22/2020 05:44PM
Youtube link making bindings from rubber inner tube.

I have a pair of snowshoes that I made about 50 years ago and I made inner tube bindings. They may not be the best binding but they work good. If I am going to be taking the snowshoe on and off I grab the pair with the rubber binding. Easy on and off even with mittens.

I have 5 pairs of snowshoes all are wood except one pair. I carry aluminum pair in my plane for emergency. I hate the sound of the metal ones when they hit each other.
Pinetree
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02/22/2020 06:14PM
Bushpilot: " Youtube link making bindings from rubber inner tube.


I have a pair of snowshoes that I made about 50 years ago and I made inner tube bindings. They may not be the best binding but they work good. If I am going to be taking the snowshoe on and off I grab the pair with the rubber binding. Easy on and off even with mittens.


I have 5 pairs of snowshoes all are wood except one pair. I carry aluminum pair in my plane for emergency. I hate the sound of the metal ones when they hit each other."


Well I use to have rubber bindings from 50 years ago also and the rubber came from the big iron mining trucks on the range(probably your source) I believe. That rubber had just enough stretch to get it on(almost two hand effort) and it really held your foot in place. Many of the new rubber bindings have too much stretch in back when walking.

I love the bindings on the new metal types for you could do gymnastics in them they are so good. Like I said the new snowshoes foot placement is too far forward. Thus you sink too much,especially in front.

Went out the other day and tried my 30 inch and my 36 inch metal Atlas shoes. Both of them I sank too much forward. Put my 80inch by 3.5 inch wide skiis on and only sank one inch.

Foot placement on your floatation(sp) skis or snowshoes has to be just righ plus I believe and a minimum length and width.

Do love the claws on the metal snowshoes also.
 
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