Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Gear Forum
      Big Saws     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(677)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 07:05AM
I was wondering if anyone has any experience/input on the use of the following saws for cutting large diameter trees. If you had to saw through a mess of blowdown with diameters ranging from 8"-14" which would you choose?

30 inch fast bucksaw

30" Bob Dustrude Quick Bucksaw

Corona Saw

24" Irwin Pro Touch Course Cut

Basically I am looking for a big saw that can act as a kind of chainsaw at home (and not wake up the neighbors) and can also bring winter camping or canoeing and buck up a bunch of wood, if a little extra size and weight isn't a problem.

Anyone have experience using the first two bucksaws as a two person saw?

Thanks.
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
PortageKeeper
distinguished member(2529)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 08:11AM
I have a Fast Bucksaw. Started using it on portage clearing trips before switching to something more productive...





Haven't had the FBS out for a while, but I believe that it is a 24" and not a 30". It will be the sturdiest of all the saws that you mention, though any saw is only as good as its blade and it is hard finding a productive blade bow saw blade of that length. I'd try to give you a deal on mine, if you are interested.
The fastest option (other than a big crosscut) would be a longer Irwin Pro Touch with a supplementary handle on the other end for the second person. Also, be sure to have a wedge handy in case the tree pinches your saw.
 
pswith5
distinguished member(3335)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 11:45AM
Nctry gifted me one of the Bob Dudetrude Quick Saws for doing a favor. It fits perfectly into a saw carrier from Duluth Pack. It is designed for a bigger cut than you typically need in the bw. So for portage clearing it would work well. Not certain how it would cut as a two-person saw. It did a very nice job of cutting down my 8 foot Christmas tree!
 
dentondoc
distinguished member(1070)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 01:05PM
Ever look at a Silky Bigboy.

Yes, it only has a 14+ inch blade, but I've been through some 12-14 inch oak logs with it. It has a long handle, which means you can cut two-handed, which helps to minimize fatique. The blade has 2 positions, which facilitates an underneath cut. With the slim blade design (no "cage" on top), you can get it into some tight spots and odd angles. (Also, the no "cage" design means there is no maximum depth of cut.)

Obviously, it folds for convenient storage (which also means a built-in blade guard), has a rubberized grip for added grip and to minimize vibration, and comes in under 1 pound in carry weight. And, there is no set-up/assembly time ... just flip and go.

This saw may feel a little odd at first. Its Japanese made, which means it cuts best on the pull stroke (rather than push). The saw also produces a very clean cut, so there are no rough places to cause binding (just be careful that the cut doesn't pinch down on the blade as gravity begins to kick in ... an underneath cut helps on horizontal logs once you get about 1/2 way through on top).

I liked my first one so well that, when I lost it going down a chute in WCPP, I bought another upon returning home.

dd
 
CanoeKev
distinguished member(628)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 06:20PM
I've used the 24" fast bucksaw. It works well, but is a pain to assemble and disassemble. I've long ago settled on a standard 30" steel bow saw with a wood blade sheath. It's always ready to go, and the weight and size is not an issue with me.
 
01/13/2013 06:28PM
I've got the shorter version of the Irwin. It rips and shreds through wood like it were already shredded paper.
A friend has the fast bucksaw and brought it on a couple trips. Worked very well from what I recall.
 
HammerII
distinguished member(640)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 07:22PM
Nothing beats a 30" steel bow saw for handling big wood camping or on clearing trips. Blades are easy to find and replace with out breaking the bank. I have a pool noodle slit for coverage over the blade. You can handle granite type drift wood or larger logs for bucking down to make it back to camp. No, it doesn't break down and fit into a wallet or slip into the top of your boot. Add a pool noodle and tie it off on just about any pack for packing or tie it into a canoe for travel.
 
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(677)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 08:59PM
Thanks for all the replies everyone.

Portage Keeper- are you aware of any particular way to attach a second handle or is it just a kind jerry rigging something together? Thanks for the fast bucksaw offer, I will have to think it over. By the way, where did you pick up the crosscut saw? Is it hard to use and maintain? My great grandpa had one that wound up with my dad. It's handle is broken, and it's completely rusted, but I've always thought it would be fun to get back into working order.

Dentondoc-I've heard a couple people praise the silky big boy. Do your hands slide down the handle when you are really cranking on it? A foot of oak is impressive.

I also really like the bowsaw idea. There are some really big blades out there:
Bahco Bowsaw
 
HammerII
distinguished member(640)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/13/2013 09:31PM


You can see my bow saw in this shot. Around here it goes with me pretty much all the time for triming stuff from the upper rivers and streams. I do have a short line and float I add when cutting something in deep water. I dropped it once in a hole about 6ft deep one time and had to come back the next day to recover it from the bottom.
 
dicecupmaker
distinguished member(2152)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 04:44AM
Have made leather sheaths for the Corona saw some friends in the past.
 
PortageKeeper
distinguished member(2529)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 04:49AM
I was referring to the type of handle that is on the far end of the saw that I have pictured. It has a slot that slides onto the saw, with a pin that would go through the hole that is already in the end of an Irwin saw. You then twist the handle to tighten it down. I'd have to try one of my own to be sure that it would work. If it does work, I could locate one for you if you decide to go that route.
This type of handle has been more readily available on a search in the past, but now I see that they aren't showing up much on Ebay, or from retailers.
Most any old style crosscut saw that you purchase, new or used, requires a fair amount of attention before it can be used efficiently for sawing. I have had some training, and learned from guides such as this pdf for the sake of having a good saw for portage clearing work. I only posted the pic to show what I use. It takes a long time to refurbish and 'tune' a saw.
If putting a handle on the Irwin doesn't pan out (I'll try one later), then the Bahco Bow saw is likely your best option.
 
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(677)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 06:12AM
Thanks PortageKeeper. I will be interested to hear how it works!
 
Campcraft
distinguished member (146)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 07:39AM
For all who use the Dustrude quickbuck saw, keep an eye on the aluminum slot that the blade fits into. The hard blade will cut the slot deeper and the blade will be loose and sloppy. I have gotten alot of good use out of that saw, but would have rather found out about the slot when I was at home in the garage instead of out on a trip.

Mike
 
PortageKeeper
distinguished member(2529)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 12:23PM
quote ArrowheadPaddler: "Thanks PortageKeeper. I will be interested to hear how it works!"

Well, I found some handles that work on an Irwin saw.





The first pic shows a Simonds handle that works. The second shows a new copy of a Simonds handle, that won't work on an Irwin because the handle won't screw down far enough to tighten to the saw. The third (lying down) is an off brand that will work, that I will part with ($15 shipped) if you decide to go that route.
You just have to keep in mind that when using these handles, one person pulls the saw one way while the other person pulls it back. Having one pushing and one pulling at the same time usually is too much for the saw to handle and it wants to buckle.
Also, the pic's were taken with the handles on a 15" saw just for illustration. This system would work better on a 30" Irwin saw.
 
dentondoc
distinguished member(1070)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 04:48PM
quote ArrowheadPaddler: "Dentondoc-I've heard a couple people praise the silky big boy. Do your hands slide down the handle when you are really cranking on it? A foot of oak is impressive."
No. Not at all. The rubberized handle/blade guard is relatively tacky, so you get a really good grip.

I've also cut thru some 8" cedar. Its like a knife thru butter.

The blade will tend to flex a bit if you push too hard (since it is a "pull" cut design). Also, I don't have the "2000" model with the largest teeth. Mine is the 360-large tooth model.

dd
 
CanoeKev
distinguished member(628)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 05:35PM
If you go with a big bow saw, this simple sheath consisting of a 1x2 stip of wood with a slit cut in it works fine. I use a couple leather strips to keep it in place.
 
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(677)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 08:09PM
quote PortageKeeper: "quote ArrowheadPaddler: "Thanks PortageKeeper. I will be interested to hear how it works!"


Well, I found some handles that work on an Irwin saw.






The first pic shows a Simonds handle that works. The second shows a new copy of a Simonds handle, that won't work on an Irwin because the handle won't screw down far enough to tighten to the saw. The third (lying down) is an off brand that will work, that I will part with ($15 shipped) if you decide to go that route.
You just have to keep in mind that when using these handles, one person pulls the saw one way while the other person pulls it back. Having one pushing and one pulling at the same time usually is too much for the saw to handle and it wants to buckle.
Also, the pic's were taken with the handles on a 15" saw just for illustration. This system would work better on a 30" Irwin saw."


Thanks a ton for doing that PortageKeeper. I will let you know if I decide to go that route. I am definitely intrigued.

Thanks again for all the other input. What a great site and resource this place is.
 
pamonster
distinguished member(974)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/14/2013 08:14PM
Sven saw too small? Wont find a better one for the BWCA trip IMHO :)
 
01/14/2013 08:54PM
quote PortageKeeper: "quote ArrowheadPaddler: "Thanks PortageKeeper. I will be interested to hear how it works!"


Well, I found some handles that work on an Irwin saw.






The first pic shows a Simonds handle that works. The second shows a new copy of a Simonds handle, that won't work on an Irwin because the handle won't screw down far enough to tighten to the saw. The third (lying down) is an off brand that will work, that I will part with ($15 shipped) if you decide to go that route.
You just have to keep in mind that when using these handles, one person pulls the saw one way while the other person pulls it back. Having one pushing and one pulling at the same time usually is too much for the saw to handle and it wants to buckle.
Also, the pic's were taken with the handles on a 15" saw just for illustration. This system would work better on a 30" Irwin saw."


Thats some slick stuff there! I like.
 
KingofDuluth
 
05/27/2020 09:58AM
Hello PortageKeeper, I am looking to reproduce the handle you made for your Irwin saw. I bought a 30 inch Irwin and have been trying to find the hardware you used but am having trouble! Any help would be greatly appreciated!

p.s. I also ordered a strip of ABS from this place to make an ultralight, durable guard for the saw so it doesn't shred my pack!
https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/abs_sheets/524
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next