BWCA Ode to the red headed step child of outdoor cooking "ramen noodles" Boundary Waters BWCA Food and Recipes
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      Ode to the red headed step child of outdoor cooking "ramen noodles"     

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HammerII
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04/15/2015 12:02AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
Everyone has done it and a few have brought this humble cheap eats to new levels in the simple camp setting. So what is your favorite way to use ramen noodles while camping?
 
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04/15/2015 01:48AM  
When I solo I take ramen noodles along, I divide a pack of ramen noodles in half and mix in a half package of Knoors teriyaki noodles with about 2 cups H2O and cook them till tender, granted not gourmet eating but it's quick, easy cleanup, and it will keep your stomach from growling [which a female bear might find attractive]. Sometimes I slice and dice some deer summer sausage into a pack of ramens, again not what I'd order from a classy restaurant [I checked Mac and Dons nor Wendys don't serve ramen noodles]. FRED
 
Jackfish
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04/15/2015 08:27AM  
We eat fish everyday in Quetico, but we always bring a couple packets of ramen noodles for use in the event of bad weather, bad fishing, or both. In all the years we've gone, we've only had to use them twice, and both times, we had just a couple walleyes to feed 6-8 guys.

We cubed the walleye fillets and boiled them, then mixed them in with the ramen noodles. Between the added walleye meat and the flavored noodles, it sustained us just fine and was very delicious.
 
04/15/2015 11:46AM  

Not ashamed to admit I've probably never been to the BW without a few packs, but often only use as extras for cold, rainy, tired days. I'll make mine with only part of the broth, but add Parmesan cheese, olive oil, and black pepper.

If anyone is curious, check out a show called "Mind of a Chef" by Anthony Bourdain, season 1, episode 1 called Noodle - About history and culture of high and low end ramen - I found it interesting. On Netflix streaming and others services.
 
Swampturtle
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04/24/2015 07:29PM  
Here is a cool article on the joys of Ramen, lots of great ideas.

paddling.net article on ramen noodles
 
04/24/2015 10:24PM  
We usually take some along as an incentive to catch fish = you better get out there and catch something or dinner will be ramen. I think we have carried the same packages for years now so the threat is even worse...you better catch fish or you will eat STALE ramen noodles!
 
04/25/2015 08:13PM  
quote Rob Johnson: "We usually take some along as an incentive to catch fish = you better get out there and catch something or dinner will be ramen. I think we have carried the same packages for years now so the threat is even worse...you better catch fish or you will eat STALE ramen noodles!"

Not sure about the high end stuff, but I believe the 4 for a buck packs have half lives similar to spent plutonium. I doubt they'll go stale in our lifetimes.
 
sdebol
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04/25/2015 10:59PM  
I bring it as a "backup" meal as well. Bought some "Ramen Rescue" from Packit Gourmet but haven't tried it yet. Anyone else?
 
04/29/2015 10:00PM  
We usually take some along. We're not lunch eaters on trips because we're too busy, but usually have a pack or two of ramen along in case we get a rain or wind day. It tastes pretty good on a cool rainy day.

Our favorite way to dress it up is to add a small handful of Just Veggies freeze dried vegi mix while it's simmering.
 
jeroldharter
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04/29/2015 11:07PM  
I must say - splitting a bag of ramen in half should depress the poor in Bangladesh.

Ramen is good on a cold rainy day as a midday snack. You could mix in some dehydrated corn, mushrooms, peppers, onions, and even ground beef to amp them up.

A downside is that they are bulky.
 
1JimD
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05/12/2015 08:42AM  
My favorite way, and I do this at home.
I place the noodles in a shallow green coated fry pan, ad enough water to soak about half way up the cake. Heat and when it softens, I flip. When both sides are soft, I drain, and a little Olive oil, one or two eggs, scramble til eggs are done. Add a little of the seasoning pack, and eat.

I always pack eggs under my seat of the canoe, they portage well, and I take them out when at camp ! Don't need a bear tearing my stripper apart for the eggs !

Jim
 
cgchase
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05/12/2015 09:21AM  
You know you're getting old when the first thing that occurs to me when reading this thread is that I can't really get by on ramen anymore. About 20 years ago, I could eat anything I wanted . .or nothing at all . .and still function in the woods. Back in those days I took Ramen all the time - my favorite way being to use just a small part of the water and just a small part of the seasoning packet and eat like kind of a brothy pasta. 2 bricks, of course.

Nowadays I gotta be smart, lol. Ramen has no fiber, no nutrients, tons of fat, tons of salt. In the tiny amounts I could tolerate it in, it's not even worth it to bring.



 
05/12/2015 09:34AM  
This does not work for the BW, but it does for other locations. When I was in the Army, you got per diem when you are sent for a temporary duty assignment. This is usually training. It was a fixed dollar amount a day that was intended for food and how you spent it was up to the individual. To cover the bar tab, many of us would have Vegetable Beef Soup Especial. This was a can of Cambells and a package of Ramen minus the seasoning, thrown in the microwave for a couple of minutes. Out it would come and I had a full meall for a couple of dollars.
 
HammerII
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05/12/2015 10:21AM  
nutrition info
quote cgchase: "You know you're getting old when the first thing that occurs to me when reading this thread is that I can't really get by on ramen anymore. About 20 years ago, I could eat anything I wanted . .or nothing at all . .and still function in the woods. Back in those days I took Ramen all the time - my favorite way being to use just a small part of the water and just a small part of the seasoning packet and eat like kind of a brothy pasta. 2 bricks, of course.


Nowadays I gotta be smart, lol. Ramen has no fiber, no nutrients, tons of fat, tons of salt. In the tiny amounts I could tolerate it in, it's not even worth it to bring.



"


Oh no another myth comes to light. Much like potato's its what added that gives ramen such a bad name. Those little favor packets are the part that tosses the sodium levels toward the roof with most of the fat levels hidden in there too. What makes then a grat camp food is the fact that the noodles can be used for a number of different dishes weight next to nothing and can offer a change in dinner/lunch/breakfast fare from the traditional fare. You can pair them with a number of different items or add to other dishes to extent.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/soups-sauces-and-gravies/7979/2
 
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