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dentondoc
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08/16/2016 01:27PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I've had multiple occasions when I traveled solo, and because of that, there are items that area ADDED to my list as a result of not having gear that is shared with others I'm traveling with. These added items include (among other things) a fully stocked first aid kit and tarp (although I'll down grade the tarp to a "personal" size on solos).

What do you DELETE from gear as a consequence of going solo?

One area where I save a little weight is in the cooking department. When traveling with others, I'll take a plate, bowl and personal cutlery. Those are deleted on a solo trip and I each directly from the (titanium) pots used for cooking. I'll also delete the larger pot(s) and prepare more one-pot meals. I do, however, thrown in a second stove/burner head in case the one normally used fails. Another concession is ... I don't carry a coffee pot or french press. I make my own coffee "singles" using a product called "T-Sac." They are manufactured for making personal t-bags, but work just as well for steeping coffee (in an insulated mug I carry). SORRY, I still can't do the instant stuff!!! I use the smallest binder clip I can find, which also serves as a handy handle for removing the bag from the cup/mug.

I do take a Silky Saw for trail clearing purposes, but I'm on a well traveled route, I've been know to skip that as well. I do carry a knife for batonning purposes, etc.

Have you found other ways to reduce your carry load on solo trips (e.g., using a twisted cloths line to eliminate cloths pins)?

dd
 
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08/16/2016 02:04PM  
Like you, my cook kit is smaller. Fewer pots and no fry pan; if I catch any fish I release them. Thus also means no filet knife. No plate, eat out of pots.

Sometimes no fishing gear at all.

Often will leave the hatchet and the saw home as I am not as interested in fires by myself, and there is usually plenty of breakable sized branches to be found in the woods.

Not as much butt wipe; pretty self explanatory!

Smaller first aid kit.

Always brought a tarp, but now that I have a Lean Plus, I believe I will leave the tarp at home.

Not as much cordage/rope.
 
08/16/2016 03:40PM  
I don't take a chair, saw, hatchet, less cooking gear, less cloths, next long solo no fishing gear, might try out my new solo specialist tent one and a half pounds, my tarp is smaller. Spring trip I was at 38# for nine day's, goal is still 30#.
 
08/16/2016 05:01PM  
Food and food preparation items are the biggest reduction. I am convinced on a solo food is energy and simple is better. I recently picked up a jet boil and is that lighter than my peak with fuel canister! Smaller, too. I fix one dish meals and eat out of the pot.
Smaller containers for lotions and other "shared" items, including TP.
Future plans will be to get a smaller tarp and exchange the hatchet for a good fixed blade knife. Does Dan make a solo lean plus? Going alone I like to sit in the dark and pay more attention to what is happening around camp. Making a fire is work and takes gear, but still enjoy a fire on shoulder season trips when it is dark earlier and chilly.
 
08/16/2016 07:49PM  
I've done more solos than anything else and realized very early on that the loads were heavier. Part of that is, as you mentioned, that you are still carrying a lot of the same stuff - same stove, same tarp, same first aid kit, same weather radio, same saw, same hatchet, etc. Some of that you can reduce and some you can't change by much. I also noticed that the solo canoe I rented weighed 30-32 lbs. vs. 42-44 lbs. for the tandem, so I'm carrying way more than half as much weight there. The painters don't change, the spare paddle doesn't change, etc.. You have a detachable yoke also, which weighs at least a couple of pounds.

So what to do . . . ? Like most of you, I started leaving things behind - saw, hatchet, chair, fishing gear, solar shower, etc.. I also got some lighter stuff - lighter pad, bag, tent, stove, etc. I'm still carrying a big tarp, but looked at getting a smaller one and a 10x10 would only save 4 oz. Still something to think about for the future - would save some bulk and a little more weight (1-2 oz.?) in cordage/stakes.

I also simplified the food and prep - all dehydrated foods eaten out of the bag means I don't need a lot of kitchen utensils and no cleaning supplies. Just heating water takes less fuel than cooking. Cold cereal fort breakfast saves fuel. Via coffee. Basically, I have a JetBoil stove & fuel, a spoon, a cozy, a mug.

One thing not mentioned yet is water filtration and storage - I just take a small Sawyer and Platypus bag instead of the MSR gravity system I'd take for a larger group.
 
08/16/2016 08:17PM  
Forgot to mention that I don't take clothes pins either. Pants and shirts can also be buttoned/zipped around a line or branch.

bhouse - yes, there is a solo Lean plus.
 
08/16/2016 08:43PM  
Thanks, boonie, I think. Now more gear to plan for....because a lighter load makes a difference, especially for us well seasoned travelers.
 
GraniteCliffs
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08/16/2016 08:47PM  
No fishing gear. No grill in the Q. No cook kit at all. Evening meal is 100% dehydrated.
 
muddyfeet
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08/16/2016 08:58PM  
I'll agree that some of biggest gains (weight savings) can be made with food and food prep gear. Here's the ultralight kit I put together for my first solo.

Don't carry as much, if any, water. A 1L nalgene of water weighs almost 2.5 lbs. Instead, a Sawyer squeeze filter and bottle weighs less than 4oz.

Make items multipurpose: stuff sack with down jacket becomes an amazing pillow. CrazyCreek seat is also a camp chair. Your paddle and spare can also be a tarp poles.

Delete redundant items. Extra clothing, 'might need' items.

Don't take heavy, bulky rope or cord that is heavier when wet. Replace with spectra or dyneema line. I like zing-it.

Look at your pack and sleep system and shelter: If you're upgrading gear, these are three items where you can save not just ounces, but POUNDS of weight.

This blog is an excellent step-by-step on how to get lighter.
 
08/16/2016 09:03PM  
Splitting hairs here but I (Gut my Paracord), used for tarps or lining.

I learned this on the fire crew. Probably only saves a few ounces, but in backpacking I always say, ounces is pounds. It also saves room. I have 30 feet of P-cord on my Old Town in this pic, for lining the canoe or tying it to shore.

Here's how you Gut your P-Cord.
Take the P-Cord and cut it to length. Find the inner strads and start pulling on them. Depending on the length it will soon bind up with the outer core. Simply start stripping this all the way down to the other end until it is all smooth. Then pull more of the middle out and repeat the stripping. Burn ends with a lighter. (Try short lengths first) doing a 30' length takes patience.

30 feet in the last pic on my canoe These also double for shoe laces if you have a blow out. I haven't bought shoe laces in years, I buy P-Cord and Gut it, then put it on my shoes and cut to length.
 
08/17/2016 06:15AM  
I bring a small backpackers grill for when I do fish in foil. No fry pan. this solo I'm leaving the alcohol behind. I would normally bring a small nalgene of whiskey. I cut down my fishing tackle to around 10-15 lures.

I'll probably be editing more things when I load the pack and pick it up. I've decided to leave behind the depth finder this time, painful as that is.

 
jeepgirl
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08/17/2016 07:18AM  
Leaving my big DSLR at home and purchasing a Leica point and shoot camera saved a bunch of weight. Still get great photos with the Leica. I also leave the hammock at home.
Bringing less clothing saves weight too. On my first trip to the bwca, I had a new set of clothes for each day. I now bring 1 extra set of clothes and change mid week. In the past 4 years I have upgraded my gear to the ultra light backpacking gear. I have dropped about 5 pounds doing that.
 
08/17/2016 01:49PM  
After watching Naked And Afraid I think I'm just going to bring footwear, a tarp, and firestarter.
 
mastertangler
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08/28/2016 08:48PM  
I'll be the odd guy out......its a canoe trip not a backpacking trip! How much of your time is actually spent on a portage trail? I bet if you added up the hours we would get a surprisingly low figure % wise. So I don't get all the muss and fuss about going ultra light.

So here's the deal.......there is no law that states you must single or double portage. If you like your loads light then just do an extra trip......simple as pie! It's a canoe trip!.......I would bet less than 20 % of your time is actually spent carrying loads.

I took EVERYTHING on my last trip........seriously, it was ridiculous. But I was glad I did. Made the trip lots more fun. The one concession I made was to ditch the fuel canisters and go with a twig stove which worked wildly well!

Here's the catch.......I did 4 trips. Yup, I didn't just triple (I did on the way back) but quadrupled to get my stuff across and I had several long portages to start out. The Knox Bog Trot and I became very well acquainted. Other than that I have no regrets and will probably shoot for tripling in the future as my new normal.
 
08/29/2016 01:12PM  
MT, didn't you just do a month long solo? Trip report??
 
mastertangler
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08/29/2016 01:44PM  
quote TomT: "MT, didn't you just do a month long solo? Trip report??
"


Hiya Tom
Yup, just rolled back into Michigan. Didn't you do a two week trip yourself?
I kept a journal daily and took a bunch of pics as well as several videos. Best trip ever? Maybe......it was a hoot!

If the past is any indicator I will jump right on the trip report while everything is fresh in my mind and before I get caught up with work. I will be offering "points" to anyone who reads the entire TR. it will probably write up like a novel (does it ever end). You will be able to use the points at MT Enterprises on-line website.
 
08/29/2016 07:31PM  
I wish I could take a month off, then I might slow down a little, I still double portage and that will probably not change, unless I go to the extreme and only take stuff I really need to survive.
 
08/29/2016 08:21PM  
quote mastertangler: "
Hiya Tom
Yup, just rolled back into Michigan. Didn't you do a two week trip yourself?
I kept a journal daily and took a bunch of pics as well as several videos. Best trip ever? Maybe......it was a hoot!


Looking very forward to the report. I start my drive north this Friday evening for two weeks in the Q. Anticipation and daydreaming has left me scatter brained. Thank God for checklists! Besides a chronic weak left ankle I have pronounced myself fit and ready for whatever I may encounter.



 
Banksiana
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08/29/2016 09:09PM  
I was having some issues with tendinitis in my knees prior to my trip in August. Decided to opt for the double portage though I packed at about the same weight/volume as I do for a single portage trip. I have to say the joy of hiking the portages in a relatively unburdened state more than made up for the loss of "efficiency". Not to mention how much less stress it was on the body- the degree of coordination and the natural stride. Like floating on air.

.
 
hobbydog
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08/29/2016 10:00PM  
Heading north on Thursday morning. Kind of scrambling with last minute stuff. It seems like I keep finding things to add to the pack. I am taking a chair for the first time. I'm getting soft.
 
08/30/2016 06:49AM  
I loaded my packs (Granite Gear and Kondos "Guide") and to my amazement have room in my small pack. I had already decided begrudgingly to leave my depth finder for fishing home but did pack my new lightweight chair. And there was room so I threw in the new Eno hammock and the tree straps. And I STILL have room. But - I'm not giving in to the temptation to go ahead and fill that space. I will enjoy the light small pack when I'm portaging the canoe.

So basically for this trip I've only packed one pair of long pants which is a first for me, and I'm leaving behind the depth finder. No fresh food either unless you count my carrot, plum, and sub sandwich for my first day.

 
MagicPaddler
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08/30/2016 08:13AM  
I do portages with 2 carries. One load is my canoe and a small pack that is my food. For a food pack I use a GossamerGear Gorilla backpack. My empty pack weighs 23.2 Oz. This is a real backpacking pack that transfers the weight to the hip belt unlike most canoe packs.
 
mastertangler
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08/30/2016 01:33PM  
Yo Tom
You cannot leave the depth finder. Especially at this time of year. Maybe in the spring but not now. You must find broken bottom in 20 ft to catch fish and that will be very hard with the depth-o-meter.

But we are hijacking DD's thread. I still say more trips across the trail is the way to go unless your are with other folk who want to "makem quick tracks" (DD will recognize that as Native American in origin). So you spend an extra 20 minutes on a portage? Big whoop! So what?

The last time I "loaded up" I crashed and burned and got a helicopter ride out. And then a $600 float plane ride in to get my ride. Never again.........I will likely be a tripler from here on in.......especially considering how I like my "stuff".

BTW Tom......just finished the audio book I picked up in Duluth, "Helmet for my Pillow" by Robert Leckie about his experience in the Pacific theatre. Superb....... A very cerebral writer and I found myself admiring his ability to make even the most mundane become works of "listening art". I must admit a certain envy of his prose.
 
mastertangler
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08/30/2016 01:33PM  
Yo Tom
You cannot leave the depth finder. Especially at this time of year. Maybe in the spring but not now. You must find broken bottom in 20 ft to catch fish and that will be very hard with the depth-o-meter.

But we are hijacking DD's thread. I still say more trips across the trail is the way to go unless your are with other folk who want to "makem quick tracks" (DD will recognize that as Native American in origin). So you spend an extra 20 minutes on a portage? Big whoop! So what?

The last time I "loaded up" I crashed and burned and got a helicopter ride out. And then a $600 float plane ride in to get my ride. Never again.........I will likely be a tripler from here on in.......especially considering how I like my "stuff".

BTW Tom......just finished the audio book I picked up in Duluth, "Helmet for my Pillow" by Robert Leckie about his experience in the Pacific theatre. Superb....... A very cerebral writer and I found myself admiring his ability to make even the most mundane become works of "listening art". I must admit a certain envy of his prose.
 
MagicPaddler
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08/30/2016 02:17PM  
Mt
When you are doing the Cache lake portages and doubling that equals 9 miles of walking in much mud. So you suggest adding 6 extra miles of walking in mud. Not for me.
MP
 
Marten
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08/30/2016 04:39PM  
I am more like MT, a lot of quad carries on my last trip and there were some long ones. I planned on a medium pack and canoe in one carry but little twinges in my back the first few portages were telling me to not do it. I had some stuff along to clean stuff off the portages which made for the additional trip. With a group I do not normally tote the items and travel where the portages are maintained. Even into the trip with the food and fuel diminishing I seem to always need three trips. I look at my outfit and don't see stuff that is not used during the trip.
 
08/30/2016 06:28PM  
quote mastertangler: "Yo Tom
You cannot leave the depth finder. Especially at this time of year. Maybe in the spring but not now. You must find broken bottom in 20 ft to catch fish and that will be very hard with the depth-o-meter.

BTW Tom......just finished the audio book I picked up in Duluth, "Helmet for my Pillow" by Robert Leckie about his experience in the Pacific theatre. Superb....... A very cerebral writer and I found myself admiring his ability to make even the most mundane become works of "listening art". I must admit a certain envy of his prose. "


You are like the little devil perched on my shoulder now. "You gotta bring it, you know you gotta bring it.... Don't worry about the measly 3 extra pounds... How are you going to troll in the "sweet spot?? ......"

It will be a game time decision. Also, the Robert Leckie book is fantastic. Those guys in the Pacific suffered a great deal. That book is a must read for anyone who wants to know what it was like fighting the Japanese on those small 100 degree, malaria infested volcanic rocks of an island.

Magic Paddler, I think if you're doing a bushwhack then it's very prudent to go as humanly light as possible. BTW, ever thought of checking out Pierna Lake? That's one I'd like to see some day.

 
MagicPaddler
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08/30/2016 07:02PM  
quote TomT: pot?? ......"


Magic Paddler, I think if you're doing a bushwhack then it's very prudent to go as humanly light as possible. BTW, ever thought of checking out Pierna Lake? That's one I'd like to see some day.


"

I was just on Keefer and Sark right next door but but. TT Don’t do that to me!
 
mastertangler
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08/31/2016 06:20AM  
quote MagicPaddler: "Mt
When you are doing the Cache lake portages and doubling that equals 9 miles of walking in much mud. So you suggest adding 6 extra miles of walking in mud. Not for me.
MP
"


Point conceded MP.

Of course one must take such logistics into consideration from the very start when planning a route. Having said that I did quad carry through the Knox bog trot which seems close to a mile. And I had no regrets. It has taken me some time to adjust to the concept that it's OK to make more than the customary 2 portages.
 
08/31/2016 06:41AM  
quote MagicPaddler: "quote TomT: pot?? ......"
Magic Paddler, I think if you're doing a bushwhack then it's very prudent to go as humanly light as possible. BTW, ever thought of checking out Pierna Lake? That's one I'd like to see some day.

"

I was just on Keefer and Sark right next door but but. TT Don’t do that to me!"


Tim Mead wet my whistle in his book Quetico Adventures.

 
09/05/2016 10:27PM  
quote TomT: "After watching Naked And Afraid I think I'm just going to bring footwear, a tarp, and firestarter."

LOL...that would be ultralight.

I find I leave my tarp/bug net and wood cutting items behind on solos as I generally don't have fires alone and I am fine retreating to my tent/hammock in rain and with wearing extra layers and bug net hat if I want to sit out when the bugs are bad.

My cook kit is smaller, my food barrel is lighter, my first aid kit is smaller, my shelter is geared to one person, and I just bring layers not a second set of clothing since no one else will smell me and I can always rinse my main layer out on a sunny day if the mood strikes me.
 
MagicPaddler
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09/11/2016 09:56AM  
Lighten up one piece of gear at a time. I like a container with a liquid tight lid in my cook kit. It gets used to hydrate some foods while packed in my pack on travel days. It also gets used to mix up food by shaking it (pudding, milk, pancakes). It needs to be more than a cup and about 2 cups is ideal. I have used several plastic containers with snap on lids with varying success. I found that Ball jar lids fit peanut butter jars. The peanut butter jar + the lid is lighter than what I have used in the past and with a screw on lid there is little chance of it coming open in my pack. As a test I filled the jar half full and put the lid on and shook it hard and had no leaks.
 
09/14/2016 01:01PM  
You can always spend more to lighten up, or skimp on equipment. But just good planning and packing can do a lot.
Because I will double portage, I use 2 packs. Small daypack with the canoe, backpacking pack for the other. The backpack is normally between 25-35 pounds and carries camp and personal gear. Small pack is kitchen and food. Between 10-15 pounds. Could go much lighter but for solo canoe tripping and my portage style, very little to gain. I do keep track/records of gear and weights cause I backpack some, base weight no food/water/fuel, is below 20 pounds (no ultra light gear, I carry a solo 4 season tent, Whisperlite stove. The most savings I have made came from food reduction and clothing, eliminating the excess/extra/unnecessary.

butthead
 
09/14/2016 05:00PM  
These points have probably been covered but I started shaving weight by dehydrating food. From there I searched out a lighter solo tent and eventually bought carbon/graphite fiber tent poles. That dropped total solo tent weight to about 3lbs 10oz. Not the lightest tent out there but I couldn't (yet) justify dropping 4 to 500 bucks on a superlight 2lbs tent. I've used the same approach with my down bag, an old NF Blue Kazoo that I just had restuffed. It weighs in at 2lbs.

I would guess that my heaviest items are probably now the amount of extra clothes that I bring, my Helinox and AquaQuest 8x10 tarp. These weigh in somewhere in the range of 3lbs, under 1 3/4lbs, and 1lb respectively.

I haven't yet down the backpacking-thing of drilling holes in my toothbrush but I may have to weed out some fishing lures and leave my Pmax 170 at home on occasion to lighten the load.
 
09/15/2016 08:49PM  
The biggest weight saving I've found (besides less food) is bringing a hammock instead of a tent. That means I have a quilt instead of a sleeping bag. There's no ground cloth, no axe, one change of clothes, and a small folding chair because I want something to sit on with a back on it. I do allow myself fishing gear and a depth finder. I use a CCS 10 x 14 Tundra Tarp so I can stay dry no matter the weather.
 
09/16/2016 08:08PM  
quote Sierra1: "The biggest weight saving I've found (besides less food) is bringing a hammock instead of a tent. That means I have a quilt instead of a sleeping bag. There's no ground cloth, no axe, one change of clothes, and a small folding chair because I want something to sit on with a back on it. I do allow myself fishing gear and a depth finder. I use a CCS 10 x 14 Tundra Tarp so I can stay dry no matter the weather. "

Good point on the hammock vs. tent. I just picked up a solo from a member on this site. Now I need the mosquito netting over top and I'll be set to give it a try....in warmer weather!
 
Alan Gage
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09/17/2016 09:39PM  
The biggest weight saving I've found (besides less food) is bringing a hammock instead of a tent.

I've been a hammocker for years and this year did my trip sleeping on the ground because I didn't think I'd be able to find suitable trees for hanging. My sleeping kit was the same weight.

Alan
 
gymcoachdon
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09/17/2016 10:47PM  
I have heard arguments about weight savings with hammocks, I'm not buying it. In my case I saved a bunch of weight with the hammock because it is replacing a 4 man tent, large basecamp thermarest, and a heavy sleeping bag. But if I had spent my $$ on lightweight solo tent, pad, and bag, I'm sure the weight would be similar.
Going solo, I use a CCS 10x12 as my hammock tarp, with a 50 ft ridgeline, and 25 ft of line at 6 points. By setting it up in "porch mode", I can utilize the space to store gear, cook, read, etc., that you normally do under your tarp on a rainy day, so no additional tarp needed. That does save a few pounds.
My complete hammock setup comes in at just under 7 lbs, with 20 degree under and top quilt, straps, suspension, hammock, pillow, and tarp with all the tie out lines and stakes for tightening it down for nasty stuff. What I feel I gain is the flexibility of the hammock, my back is much better in the morning, and the dual use of the tarp.
I recently bought and used the helinox chair one, nice for lounging under the tarp during a few storms, and I use it as a nightstand beside the hammock. 2 lbs, 2 oz, it is worth it to me!
Going solo, I have a very simple cook kit, and like the simplicity of preparing and cleaning up after FBC or one pot meals. Light cook kit, and dehydrated meals is where I cut weight on a solo.
 
09/18/2016 10:36AM  
quote Alan Gage: "The biggest weight saving I've found (besides less food) is bringing a hammock instead of a tent.


I've been a hammocker for years and this year did my trip sleeping on the ground because I didn't think I'd be able to find suitable trees for hanging. My sleeping kit was the same weight.


Alan"


Which one do you like better given a choice?
 
Alan Gage
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09/19/2016 12:43PM  
quote boonie: "

Which one do you like better given a choice?"


I find the hammock more comfortable and I'd choose it if I had the choice. With a decent pad (Neoair Trekker) sleeping on the ground was much more comfortable than I remember it being last time I did it (6 years ago?). Quite a bit of tossing and turning the first few nights trying to stay comfortable but after that my body got used to it and there was no problem.

Maybe I should clarify that from a comfort standpoint I prefer the hammock but this trip saw a lot of wind and rain with many days of being stuck in camp waiting out the weather. I was using a CCS Lean for my shelter and it was nice to have a big open space where I could spread things out and sit up. Laying in a hammock for two days would have been even less fun. You could take down the hammock and just stay under the tarp but it needs to be pitched low to keep wind driven rain out and there's nothing to keep you and your gear off the wet ground unless you bring a ground cloth. No bug protection under a tarp either. So in that respect I was glad I had a tent.

It was a 42 day trip and rained on 30 of them. Future trips will depend on location, time of year, and duration when deciding to bring the hammock, Lean, or more traditional tent.

To get back on topic a bit to save weight on solos I don't bring a second change of clothes. I can change into my cold weather clothes (thermal underwear, fleece, rain jacket) in camp in case my daily clothes are soaked but otherwise I wear the same clothes the entire trip.

All my food is dehydrated but I feel there's too much waste in cooking meals in a bag. All my ingredients are packaged separately so I can cook however much I want of anything at any meal. I rehydrate in a 1.3L titanium pot that also holds my stick stove and stainless mug when packed. I cook over a fire, mostly with the stick stove, and only bring a small alcohol stove for backup. On the 42 day trip I just finished I only brought 16 ounces worth of fuel. Didn't use the stove at all for the first month but then cold, wet, and windy weather hit hard and I started to get lazy.

I'm addicted to bannock and eat it every day otherwise I could lose another pound or so by ditching my 8" skillet. Skillet needs to have a relatively thick/heavy bottom so can't use an ultralight one.

Carbon paddles.

I don't normally take a hatchet or axe because I don't normally have big fires. I did take a hatchet on my recent trip though and am glad I did. Didn't use it a lot but it made splitting larger pieces of wood a lot easier.

No chairs. No plates or bowls. No electronics (other than camera). I build my own canoes and cut weight wherever possible. This includes carbon yokes, thwarts, and seat. Saved 6-7 pounds over the same design of canoe I used last year. This was much appreciated when carrying my gear pack and canoe together.

All my gear fits in a CCS Pioneer pack with some room to spare. I didn't weigh my gear pack before this trip but my 30L barrel weighed 35 pounds and the gear pack was considerably less. I'd guess 30 pounds.

My food runs about 1.5-1.6 pounds/day. That includes snacks and hot chocolate.

Alan
 
mastertangler
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09/19/2016 01:52PM  
Same clothes?.......eww! ;-0

I wear the same clothes on travel days and they get pretty ripe. But in camp comfort is king and I have a fairly generous selection to choose from as well as separate sleeping clothes AND a set of dedicated fishing clothes.
My Railrider Weather Pants finally bit the dust on this last trip and I left the woods minus a pant leg.

No Chair either? The Horror! That would be inconceivable for me and I would probably quit a trip if I was without a chair. I do most work in camp from a sitting position......stuffing tents, bags, cooking etc.
 
Alan Gage
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09/19/2016 02:15PM  
quote mastertangler: "Same clothes?.......eww! ;-0


I wear the same clothes on travel days and they get pretty ripe. But in camp comfort is king and I have a fairly generous selection to choose from as well as separate sleeping clothes AND a set of dedicated fishing clothes.
My Railrider Weather Pants finally bit the dust on this last trip and I left the woods minus a pant leg.

No Chair either? The Horror! That would be inconceivable for me and I would probably quit a trip if I was without a chair. I do most work in camp from a sitting position......stuffing tents, bags, cooking etc. "


I use Railriders pants as well. Last year I brought a backup pair of pants but did the entire 30 day trip wearing the same pair. This year I didn't bother with the backups and used the same pair from last year for the entire 42 days. Lots of local day trips on that pair of pants too. A few small holes on the shins to patch but otherwise going strong. I rinse the clothes off in the lake every now and again and I spend quite a bit of time wading through thigh deep water when ascending rapids so the pants are always getting "cleaned" so to speak.

It helps that I'm not usually tripping during the hot and humid times of the year. I was far enough north that despite being out all of August the temperatures felt like autumn (and winter).

I have a hard time understanding why people bring chairs. I have pads to make sitting on my 30L blue barrel comfortable but I still rarely use it. I have no problems finding comfortable places to sit on the ground, even bare rock. It's just a matter of finding the right contours. Besides, I sit for 8-10 hours a day in the canoe so it feels good to stand up and walk around in camp.

I think a lot of it comes down to tripping style. I prefer to be on the move and don't like to spend a lot of time in camp so a chair and some other "luxuries" hold no interest for me.

Alan
 
mastertangler
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09/19/2016 04:29PM  
You seem like an interesting guy Alan.......plus your parents spelled your name right!

Yup only one pair of pants........but I also bring a pair of shorts.........and a pair of Under Armour Heat Gear underwear set which are excellente'. I wear the Under armor set around camp. Very comfy.

As per my chair........my beloved chair. Ahhh......., Ahem, where were we? Oh yes, talking about having to stoop and bend over to break down and set up camp. All with tight hamstrings and a back, which on occasion, can cause me some "issues". No stooping for me. Sit and stuff tent.....sit and stuff sleeping bag.......sit and cook dinner......sit comfortably and eat dinner.......sit and write in journal. And all with a backrest........AHHHHH! And at 2lbs well worth it!

You must be a young whippersnapper Alan Gage. I'm an old guy and hate sitting on wet mossy logs, rocks and can't squat (dang tight hamstrings). So for me the chair isn't a luxury but rather a requirement.
 
paddlefamily
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09/27/2016 02:41PM  
Lots of great ideas here.

I do dehydrated meals and eat from the bags - no dishes. Yay. I bring one small pot for boiling water. I do bring some non-dehydrated high fat/calorie snacks for lunches.

If I don't bring the dog, I use an ultra-light hammock or Tarptent ProTrail (just use sticks for set up).

I wear the same t-shirt, pants and shoes. Baselayers are for sleeping and back-up. 2-pairs underwear and I rewash them. 2-pairs of wool-blend socks - one pair is usually wet, the other always dry (for sleeping).





 
OldGreyGoose
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10/03/2016 09:39PM  
Lot of good ideas shared. I have already used many of them but was still going too heavy. Finally this year I did 2 things...1 was use a solo tent weighing 2#14oz...2 was not using my traditional GG and Kondos packs, but using a 65L Kelty backpack, and a small pack I had for deer hunting. Tent stuff in 65L, kitchen stuff in the other. If it won't fit it stays home. Total gear weighed about 40#. Next solo I'm replacing the hunting pack with an ultralight unbranded daypack.
--Goose
 
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