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Whatsit
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12/04/2016 10:39AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
Hi everyone
When I normally go to the BWCA I go with my brother in law. And we have lots of food, but going in solo I don't need to think about him, only me so was wondering what most of you take for meals when you are doing solo trips?
Thanks
Mike
 
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dentondoc
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12/04/2016 11:16AM  
I don't find that I make many changes for most meals when I travel solo. For the typical meals I take, I do reduce the amount by a tad more than 50% since my typical paddling partners tend to eat a bit more than I do. In addition, I tend to eat somewhat less when I travel alone than I do with company. I guess eating is also a social activity.

One change I do make is to go with a few more simple/one-pot meals rather than more complicated meals (e.g., pizza, burritos, etc). In addition, I will sometimes switch my lunch and dinner meals. Going alone, you are not messing with someone else's eating expectations as to when the larger meal might be consumed.

As far as meals, per se go, I'll tend to do a few more pasta or grain based meals and perhaps a few more hearty soups (esp. in cooler weather).

dd
 
12/04/2016 01:48PM  
I have always been the trip leader so planned meals based on who was going. When alone I initially just cut things down portion size, but found I eat differently when it is for energy rather than a social and related purposes.
Simple one skillet meals and soups and things like protein bars, nuts, and cheese sticks go a long way. A standard is foil packages of chicken/beef/fish combined with a rice/noodle/potato and dried veggie such as corn/peas/carrots/beans. Re hydrate the starch and veggie then add the meat and enjoy. I will take a couple pieces of cinnamon bread to make french toast for a non-travel breakfast and usually one celebration meal with something extra. Some clementines can be a real treat in the morning and travel well.
 
12/04/2016 02:36PM  
Depends on personal tastes and style. Simple boil meals all the way to intricate cooked/baked dishes. I tend to spend time of crafting meals so my packing is geared to that.
I tend to pack ingredients rather than individual meals. The source was a book on outdoor cookery from NOLS, it's termed "pantry style", food packing/preperation.

butthead
 
Alan Gage
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12/04/2016 05:54PM  
Eating the same thing every day doesn't bother me so I have a pretty basic menu. Breakfast is oatmal and raisins with sugar. Lunch is bannock with peanut butter. Dinner is grains (usually quinoa) beans, vegetables, and olive oil. Snacks are dried fruit, peanut M&Ms, almonds, hot chocolate, and a dark chocolate bar to eat at the halfway point of the trip. The only condiments I usually carry are salt and sugar.

My criteria when meal planning, in no particular order, are:
Tastes good
Easy/fast to cook
Nutritious
Low bulk
Low weight
Cheap
Little cleanup required

Despite the simplicity of the meals I don't feel like I'm depriving myself of anything and usually relish each meal. When I was planning my first long trip I was trying to come up with a lot of variety in the menu when I suddenly realized I eat the same thing for breakfast and lunch everyday at home so why not do the same on a trip?

I really like bannock so I carry more than I'd need just for lunch. If I add extra water and a little powdered egg it makes great pancake batter. I dissolve sugar in water for "syrup". Sometimes I'll cook a lighter dinner and have bannock as a side.

Like Butthead I keep all my ingredients separate so I can mix and match as I desire. That comes in especially handy when portioning out beans. I cooked meals at home using the same dehydrated ingredients I'd use on the trip to get an idea of portion size. I weighed the ingredients as I added them to the pot so once I had the portion size right I knew the weight of each ingredient. That made it easy to figure out how much to pack for a trip. For example if 2 ounces of vegetables goes into dinner then figure out how many dinners you plan to eat with vegetables and multiply it by two. So for a 7 day trip I'd weigh out 14 ounces of vegetables. I also know how many ounces are in a handful (1 ounce for me) so that makes it easy to measure out the correct amount on the trip.

Like others have said you might eat less than you think. I've noticed for the first 1 1/2 weeks I (and my dog to) eat considerably less than full portions, often only two meals/day despite long days and hard paddling/portaging. I'm assuming my body is burning off fat stores for energy. But after 1 1/2-2 weeks much of that reserve seems to be gone and suddenly I start eating a lot of food and am nearly always hungry. I usually find it's a good thing I ate less than planned the first half of the trip because the second half I often eat more than planned.

This is 45 days worth of food for Sadie and I from our big trip this summer:



Alan

 
bwcasolo
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12/04/2016 05:54PM  
i eat hawk vittles, the reason i like hawks food so much, is the package is smaller for a one serving meal, and they are made with real, good food, by an ex-chef.
oatmeal, the real stuff, with dried fruit, nuts, and great instant coffee, medaglio dora, completes my solo bear barrel. i do eat fish. i do eat less when i solo, and i do enjoy a bit of brown liquor with lake water.
 
12/04/2016 07:27PM  
Alan and Butthead,
You guys Rock. Don't know if I could ever be that organized, but my longest solo has only been a week. You have given me something to shoot for when I retire.

Alan,
I don't think my one eyed dog could ever survive 45 days with that amount of food.
How much does she weigh and what is her energy level?
My dog is a high energy 75# Shepard.
What kind of food is it? Did you feed her fish?
 
12/04/2016 08:02PM  
Like butthead said, "Depends on personal tastes and style." I am on the simple side, but many similarities with others and some differences. I like to keep it on the simple side on a solo since I have to carry all the weight and do all the camp chores. I prefer to spend my time there doing other things than cooking, cleaning dishes, and hanging food packs so I have gone to a system that eliminates and minimizes those chores, while also reducing the number and weight of things that need to be carried.

Like Alan, I don't have to have a different food for every meal. I have also learned that I don't eat as much on a solo as I first expected and have done enough solos (up to 12 days) to learn just how much I need to be satisfied. I no longer come out with days and pounds of extra food like I did the first time. I take prepackaged breakfasts and dinners from Hawk Vittles and Outdoor Herbivore. I add water to the baggie and eat them out of the bag. The bag goes in the garbage bag (a Ziploc). The spoon gets sanitized. The coffee mug gets a quick rinse (sometimes) with water.

On my last solo (12 days) I had cold cereal (2 different varieties) every morning with Starbucks Via coffee. I have found at least a half-dozen dinners from these 2 companies that I like and that's enough variety for me. I have a ProBar Meal for lunch each day and have a snack bag of 4 ounces of mixed nuts or mixed nuts with a little dried fruit for snacks every day. The mixed nuts are a very calorie-dense food (calories per ounce) and not too bulky. All of this food comes to about 2,200 calories a day and comes in lightweight packaging with minimal bulk. A days food weighs 18-20 ounces. Quite a few days will fit in a bear canister like my BearVault (larger one) or an Ursack. I have got as much as 8-9 days in a BearVault. One added note: the packaging of some of these is not safe for adding boiling water and I carry some that are and transfer them first.

If you are unfamiliar with what is generally called "freezer-bag cooking", boiling water is added to dehydrated food and kept warm in a "cozy" until ready to eat. I hold the cozy in my hand and eat it out of the bag, then I put the bag in the garbage, sanitize the spoon, and I'm done. There's no plate, bowl, other utensils, or pot to clean. Consequently there's no other kitchen stuff to carry besides the stove, fuel, pot, coffee mug, spoon, and cozy. Very little fuel, time, or effort is required and there's no food pack to hang (not my favorite activity) since it all fits in the BearVault/Ursack. BTW, I use a JetBoil stove and have used a small fuel canister, which is slightly less than 8 ounces total weight (slightly less than 4 ounces fuel) to heat water for as many as 9 dinners + 19 coffees.

Sorry about the long post (hope it wasn't TMI). We have all done several posts on the solo food topic - if you search the threads you'll find even more information and ideas. If you have any questions about anything I've said, just ask. If you want to email me directly for more specific or detailed information, just put something in the subject line so I can identify you/it from this forum.

Good luck.




 
Alan Gage
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12/04/2016 09:17PM  
Alan,
I don't think my one eyed dog could ever survive 45 days with that amount of food.
How much does she weigh and what is her energy level?
My dog is a high energy 75# Shepard.
What kind of food is it? Did you feed her fish?


She's got a pretty high energy level but weighs in around 27 pounds so she doesn't require a ton of food. I don't remember off hand but I think I took about 18 pounds of food for her which was about perfect.

The food was some variety of Science Diet. I went to the store and found some that had significantly more calories and fat than her normal line of Science Diet. That was her only food other than the berries she kept eating whenever I'd turn my back.

Alan
 
Whatsit
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12/05/2016 08:54PM  
Thanks! These are all great ideas. I was thinking just very simple too. Same thing for breakfast and lunch and a dried meal for dinner every night. what are some of the instant coffees you all bring? I saw Starbucks, but I don't care for Starbucks. Any others people would recommend?
 
RetiredDave
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12/05/2016 09:13PM  
quote Whatsit: "Thanks! These are all great ideas. I was thinking just very simple too. Same thing for breakfast and lunch and a dried meal for dinner every night. what are some of the instant coffees you all bring? I saw Starbucks, but I don't care for Starbucks. Any others people would recommend?"

I'm probably in the minority on this, but back when I first started camping with my dad he just took coffee grounds and threw them in boiling water. Most of the grounds settle and it tastes really good. That's how I do it when I travel, I just let them boil for a few minutes. It's so easy and I think it tastes great. I do get the extra bonus of chewing on a few stray coffee grounds as well!

Dave
 
12/05/2016 10:15PM  
I know Folgers makes a similar product, sometimes I take it as I'm not a Starbucks faithful either. Maybe one or two others make a similar product. I sometimes use Via in a generic sense.
 
12/05/2016 10:21PM  
quote RetiredDave: "quote Whatsit: "Thanks! These are all great ideas. I was thinking just very simple too. Same thing for breakfast and lunch and a dried meal for dinner every night. what are some of the instant coffees you all bring? I saw Starbucks, but I don't care for Starbucks. Any others people would recommend?"


I'm probably in the minority on this, but back when I first started camping with my dad he just took coffee grounds and threw them in boiling water. Most of the grounds settle and it tastes really good. That's how I do it when I travel, I just let them boil for a few minutes. It's so easy and I think it tastes great. I do get the extra bonus of chewing on a few stray coffee grounds as well!


Dave
"


Nope I've done cowboy coffee for a looooooonnng time, only recently (last 10 years), changing to a coffee press to trap the grounds. Tip for ya, take the pot off the fire before adding coffee. Just steep it not boil it, as strong but not burnt/bitter.

butthead
 
GraniteCliffs
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12/06/2016 09:15PM  
I am on the simple side of soloing. I bring a stove, dehydrated food for dinner and skip all the cooking time/equipment. On a summer trip also often skip the fire simply because it is light so long regardless. Less weight and less work. Not for everyone but I like it.
 
GraniteCliffs
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12/06/2016 09:18PM  
I am also a convert to Starbucks Via. Light, quick and no equipment needed. Of course, I am a one cup a day guy so it is just easier to have coffee and then use the same cup for my instant oatmeal. Simple plan for a simple guy I guess.
 
Whatsit
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12/06/2016 10:02PM  
Normally my brother in law bring this coffee thingy that you place on top of a cup and put real grounds in it and you pour the boiling water over it, but that's such a mess and hassle. I don't have the patience to screw around with stuff like that, that's why I was wondering what you all use for instant. I was in the store a day ago and notice they sell little packets of instant in single servings. I will try it out during the long winter. Thanks again for everyone's comments. I also bring Cliff Jacobson's Hudson Bay bread as very good snack bars.
Mike
 
12/07/2016 11:53AM  
I like Camp Chow meals, made by the Trail Center Lodge on the Gunflint Trail. They have a lot of dehydrated meals for "one" person.

Coffee= Starbucks Via.
 
12/07/2016 01:10PM  
quote Whatsit: I was in the store a day ago and notice they sell little packets of instant in single servings. I will try it out during the long winter. Thanks again for everyone's comments. I also bring Cliff Jacobson's Hudson Bay bread as very good snack bars.
Mike"


Exactly the same thing I use.
Tasters Choice singles bought at Wallgreens.
Singles
 
12/08/2016 07:33AM  
I like the Camp Chow meals from the Trail Center. Chile and the couscous ones are my favorite so far. If you don't want "overly soupy" Chile only use about 1/2 the suggested amount of water.

Lunches I do tuna pouches, beef jerky, trail mix, and clif bars.

Breakfast I do Crapola brand granola that I divide into little baggies for each morning and/or clif bars.

For coffee I do the little single serve packets that you saw. Simple, no mess, and tastes good enough for me. I like the "Nescafe" ones the best compared to Folgers etc. It's only like $1 for a packet of 6 I think.
 
mastertangler
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12/08/2016 07:57AM  
Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product
 
Whatsit
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12/08/2016 02:47PM  
quote LindenTree3: "quote Whatsit: I was in the store a day ago and notice they sell little packets of instant in single servings. I will try it out during the long winter. Thanks again for everyone's comments. I also bring Cliff Jacobson's Hudson Bay bread as very good snack bars.
Mike"



Exactly the same thing I use.
Tasters Choice singles bought at Wallgreens.
Singles "

Yes, that's what I saw. Thanks
Mike
 
12/08/2016 05:50PM  
quote mastertangler: "Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product "

I did, but hadn't had a chance to check it out. I will see if I can get a jar of the instant to try.
 
12/08/2016 09:47PM  
quote boonie: "quote mastertangler: "Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product "


I did, but hadn't had a chance to check it out. I will see if I can get a jar of the instant to try."

That's what Shug drinks with his "pap-tarts". I go with Hodgson Mill oat bran hot cereal. You throw in cereal with water and bring to a boil then simmer 2 minutes. I like it better than the instant Quaker oatmeal. For lunch I kept it simple. I dehydrated fruit and made my own gorp. A company called Usana Health Sciences provided trail bars and protein shake mix. Some peanut butter cookies for dessert.
 
Whatsit
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12/09/2016 04:51PM  
quote TomT: "quote boonie: "quote mastertangler: "Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product "



I did, but hadn't had a chance to check it out. I will see if I can get a jar of the instant to try."

That's what Shug drinks with his "pap-tarts". I go with Hodgson Mill oat bran hot cereal. You throw in cereal with water and bring to a boil then simmer 2 minutes. I like it better than the instant Quaker oatmeal. For lunch I kept it simple. I dehydrated fruit and made my own gorp. A company called Usana Health Sciences provided trail bars and protein shake mix. Some peanut butter cookies for dessert."

Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?
 
12/09/2016 07:02PM  
quote Whatsit:
Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?"


I've eaten alot of Mountain House meals.
They are good but spendy and take up a lot to room/bulky.
 
Whatsit
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12/09/2016 09:57PM  
quote LindenTree3: "quote Whatsit:
Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?"



I've eaten alot of Mountain House meals.
They are good but spendy and take up a lot to room/bulky."

I was thinking just getting a back for each evening. Then I'm not screwing around. My only worry is they seem to have a lot of sodium in each meal and I already have high blood pressure. Do any of you worry about the high sodium in these meals?
 
12/09/2016 11:24PM  
quote Whatsit: "quote LindenTree3: "quote Whatsit:
Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?"




I've eaten alot of Mountain House meals.
They are good but spendy and take up a lot to room/bulky."

I was thinking just getting a back for each evening. Then I'm not screwing around. My only worry is they seem to have a lot of sodium in each meal and I already have high blood pressure. Do any of you worry about the high sodium in these meals?"


I used to take the Mountain House Pro Paks, but not anymore. I switched for several reasons. One is that they have a lot of sodium and additives, and they taste like it. That's not the kind of food we eat at home these days. As you know, they have a lot of sodium - for example the Chili Mac w/Beef has 780 mg in a 230 calorie serving and there are 2 servings in the bag, so the whole 460 calorie meal has a whopping 1,560 mg. They also have a lot of ingredients that are aren't recognizable foods. Mountain House Chili Mac All off their Pro Paks are, I believe well over 1,000 mg.

I now take Outdoor Herbivore (OH) and Hawk Vittles (HV) almost exclusively. They both have less sodium than Mountain House, sometimes dramatically so. Hawk Vittles meals range from about 65 mg of sodium to around 1,000 mg. The ones with beans are the higher ones - must be canned beans. The Outdoor Herbivore meals average right around 500 mg.

Outdoor Herbivore Lickety Split Lentils has 508 mg in a 647-calorie meal and has a recognizable list of ingredients.

I like Hawk Vittles Cashew Curry Curry&h=1&n=1&x=&s=15 which has 65 mg of sodium in a 633-calorie meal. I also like his Bacon Baked Beans, although there's 1706 mg in the meal. I also like the Beef Stew with 381 mg.

The packaging of both these - OH & HV meals - is a lot less bulky and packs better in aa bear canister than the MH product. The HV meals can be rehydrated and eaten out of the bag, but the bag isn't a zip bag, so needs to be clipped shut or transferred to a bag that zips shut. The packaging of OH meals is not suitable for boiling water. I just transfer both the OH and HV meals to a bag that is designed for boiling water and zips closed.

I consistently eat lower sodium foods at home (my wife has high blood pressure) and so the things like Mountain House just taste way too salty for me. They just don't taste good anymore with all the sodium and chemicals.
 
bwcasolo
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12/10/2016 06:08AM  
quote boonie: "quote mastertangler: "Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product "


I did, but hadn't had a chance to check it out. I will see if I can get a jar of the instant to try."

the best prices i have found are on amazon, i buy plenty, for i use it year around on other camping, canoe adventures, or at home in a pinch, soooo good.
 
12/10/2016 07:59AM  
Thanks - I'm hoping to find a small jar at Kroger's to try, but if not I'll get some at Amazon.

 
12/10/2016 09:25AM  
quote Whatsit: "quote LindenTree3: "quote Whatsit:
Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?"




I've eaten alot of Mountain House meals.
They are good but spendy and take up a lot to room/bulky."

I was thinking just getting a back for each evening. Then I'm not screwing around. My only worry is they seem to have a lot of sodium in each meal and I already have high blood pressure. Do any of you worry about the high sodium in these meals?"


That's what I had on my 1st two solos. They are ok but as you mentioned salty. To help with the bulk of packaging I repackaged it into freezer strength ziplock baggies. Very simple and no mess: dump water in, wait, and eat with no dishes to do other than a spoon.

My 3rd solo I had camp chow that I mentioned above which is made by the fine people at the Trail Center on the Gunflint Trail. Single serve chili/soups are only $3 and the other singles are $5.50. I thought it was much better tasting and less sodium than Mountain House. It's still very simple and no mess with dumping in water and eating right out of the bag. I didn't need to repackage it either. I really like not having any dishes to do especially when solo.

I may try some of the ones that boonie likes on my next solo. We'll see..... I do like supporting the fine businesses on the Gunflint Trail when I can though. Sarah and her crew at Trail Center are straight up good people.

 
Alan Gage
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12/10/2016 09:40AM  
Drying your own food is so easy and you get to choose exactly what your ingredients are. Some people really enjoy getting creative with their dried meals , and that's great for them, but I prefer to keep it simple and easy.

Buy bags of mixed frozen vegetables at the store and dump them straight into the dehydrator. How can you get simpler and cheaper than that?

I cook raw beans rather than buy in the can and dehydrate them for much faster cooking on the trip. Would be even easier to prep if you used canned beans.

Slice up apples and bananas and plop them on the trays. Leave skins on the apples. You won't notice and it makes prep a lot faster.

Since I'm a vegetarian that's it for me and I'm set for dinners (and some snacks) for the whole trip. If you want meat make yourself some beef jerky for snacks and cut it up into pieces to rehydrate along with the beans, vegetables, and whatever you're using for grains.

Breakfast and lunch are usually oatmeal and bannock so nothing else to dehydrate. Bannock is super quick and easy to mix up and pack in baggies.

A good dehydrator seems expensive but if you trip on a regular basis it will pay for itself over buying prepackaged food. Over the last two years I've spent 75 days on canoe trips. If using prepackaged meals it would have cost me $500 just for dinners alone; not to mention extra for dried fruit, of which I eat a lot (I've also never found commercially dried apples or bananas that I thought were any good).

The Excalibur is, I think, the best you can buy. I have the 9 tray model as I dry a lot of food at a time (9-10 pounds of veggies in one load) but you can save some money by getting a 5 tray model. I prefer the ones with a built in timer so that if I load it at 5pm it can shut off in the middle of the night rather than running an extra 4 hours until I wake up. If it's still not quite ready I can set it for 2 hours and walk out the door and go to work.

The large square trays of the Excalibur are great. I started with a cheap Nesco (round with a hole in the middle) and found it very frustrating. Not very many square inches of space and it's not efficiently used either. I was glad when it died.

Amazon link to 5 tray

9 tray with more power and a timer is only $50 more.

Alan
 
12/10/2016 09:45AM  
quote Whatsit: "quote LindenTree3: "quote Whatsit: I was in the store a day ago and notice they sell little packets of instant in single servings. I will try it out during the long winter. Thanks again for everyone's comments. I also bring Cliff Jacobson's Hudson Bay bread as very good snack bars.
Mike"




Exactly the same thing I use.
Tasters Choice singles bought at Wallgreens.
Singles "

Yes, that's what I saw. Thanks
Mike"


Yes, those are the nescafe ones that I like. I like them better than folgers and the other Tasters Choice ones. The small box of 7 is like $1 at Target.
 
12/10/2016 10:01AM  
I need to compliment ducks' opinion on "Camp Chow"!
While I do more complicated cooking on most trips, I do a lot of 2-3 day getaways and will then do separate bagged meal prep. Camp Chow has become a staple for that style. Easier to split into individual servings (if you buy group serving size packages), or simply go with individual sizes.
Have eaten many of the dinners and soups, the hot or cold hydration really make stuff simple. Turkey Cranberry Dressing, and Chicken Alfredo Dressing, I recommend for cold prep.

By repacking into "Baggie Twist Tie" bags much weight and bulk can be saved. This allows personal addition if desired, or the ability to split serving size in the field. Spices, home dried extra meat, freeze dried herbs and vegetables like green onion/oregano/garlic/grated carrot------whatever you prefer to add.

Freezer bag/cozie cooking has been addressed, my twist is to use insulated mugs with lids such as Snow Peak double walled mugs, or GSI Solo Press mugs, adjust servings in field as desired. Cleanup is easy as a bit of water and finger wipe to mix the clingers, drink down the post wipe liquid, lick finger dry.
GSI Solo Press gets a special mention. With both cups nestled it is an incredible insulator container, keeping meals HOT for a long time. Makes a great mug of pressed coffee also!

butthead
 
Alan Gage
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12/10/2016 10:12AM  
I know a lot of people like to rehydrate and eat right out of the bag but that seems wasteful to me and I prefer that my garbage has as little smell as possible. My last trip was 42 days and all my garbage, except for a couple peanut butter containers, fit inside a 1 gallon zip-lock baggy. There was no smell (that I could detect) associated with it. When I got home I went through those empty zip-lock baggies and put at least 80% of them back in the drawer to be reused.

Solo cleanup is easy. There's only one of you so no need to use dishes; eat right out of the pot/pan. I never use soap while on a trip. I partially fill the pot with water (no need for warm water), use my fingers to rub the inside clean, dump water, and another partial fill to swish around and dump. Takes about 30 seconds. On the rare occasion something is stuck on a little harder scrub it with some sand or else just leave it. It will probably come off next time you cook.

Alan
 
12/10/2016 04:10PM  
I like to cook some, but keep it real simple... Or I try. Two years ago I was expecting another person on a leg of my trip and I did a horrid job of repacking when they couldn't go. I brought back a lot of food. I like where you bring your own stuff even on a group deal. I've actually got a pretty good system for myself. I pretty much eat the same thing everyday for breakfast. Snacky stuff for lunch. And a pretty good system worked out for suppers. I was all set to try it out last year but couldn't physically go. Just find what you think is best for you. Winter is a good time to try out and adjust amounts. I used to vacuum seal more. Now lots of things I can premeasure in small snack ziplocks and put the ingredients in there bgs into one freezer type Ziploc bags... Small as possible. Instead of rehydrating spaghetti sauce I get tomato powder and seasoning. Hamburger and Italian sausage is most of what I have to dehydrate. Big thing about buying dehydrated meals is you are stuck with their portion sizes.
 
1JimD
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12/10/2016 09:36PM  
Great post Alan !
Now I'll have to watch for a deal on a good dehydrater !
My last one was a cheapy, and didn't make it to the new home.
It didn't dry evenly anyway.

Jim
 
Whatsit
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12/10/2016 10:39PM  
Ala. said on a solo you have very little trash. That is one thing I'm looking forward to my solo. I eat as little as I want. I only have me to worry about. When I'm canoeing in the BWCA I normally don't even feel like eating. There's so much else to do that I eat later I always think, but the others in the group want to make these huge meals which means so much to carry etc. and all the time it takes to prepar and all the clean up. I just may only do solo trips again after this one :-).
 
RetiredDave
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12/11/2016 07:03PM  
quote butthead:TARGET="_blank">GSI Solo Press gets a special mention. With both cups nestled it is an incredible insulator container, keeping meals HOT for a long time. Makes a great mug of pressed coffee also!


butthead"


You intrigued me with the Solo Press link. How exactly do you use it? If you are simply rehydrating, is that all you take in terms of a cook kit? Do you rehydrate in the solo press part or in the package then transfer? My finger is quivering on the purchase button!

Thanks!

Dave
 
12/11/2016 08:17PM  
Been using "French Press" coffee pot for a long time. When I do use a freeze-dried meals like Mountain House single servings I reconstitute it inside the press/mug combined (double layered insulation. The insulated mug holds 16oz with room and slides into the insulated press-pot that holds 24oz. Cover and let sit for as much as 1/2 hour, still very hot.


Normal use solo cookset , 1 L Alocs pot, MSR Alpine Gourmet frypan, press, cutlery/utensils.
I also use several stacking Snowpeak Ti double wall mugs in same manner, but they are $$$ with little weight savings over the GSI press set.

butthead
 
12/11/2016 08:22PM  
quote Whatsit: "Ala. said on a solo you have very little trash. That is one thing I'm looking forward to my solo. I eat as little as I want. I only have me to worry about. When I'm canoeing in the BWCA I normally don't even feel like eating. There's so much else to do that I eat later I always think, but the others in the group want to make these huge meals which means so much to carry etc. and all the time it takes to prepar and all the clean up. I just may only do solo trips again after this one :-). "

Yeah, that pretty much describes me, Mike, and why I do what I do. My trip isn't about the food - the food is just the fuel. The simpler and lighter it is, the better. It's also fairly tasty, nutritious, and satisfying to me. It's quick, too.
 
NotSoFast
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12/12/2016 08:02AM  
quote 1JimD: " Great post Alan !
Now I'll have to watch for a deal on a good dehydrater ! "


I bet there's someone who'd sell a used one for little -- or give it away because they don't use it. A relative gave us his. I do FBC, and am hoping to eventually get to the point where I'm preparing the ingredients for all my dehydrated meals.
 
RetiredDave
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12/12/2016 08:12PM  
quote butthead: "Been using "French Press" coffee pot for a long time. When I do use a freeze-dried meals like Mountain House single servings I reconstitute it inside the press/mug combined (double layered insulation. The insulated mug holds 16oz with room and slides into the insulated press-pot that holds 24oz. Cover and let sit for as much as 1/2 hour, still very hot.


Normal use solo cookset , 1 L Alocs pot, MSR Alpine Gourmet frypan, press, cutlery/utensils.
I also use several stacking Snowpeak Ti double wall mugs in same manner, but they are $$$ with little weight savings over the GSI press set.


butthead"

Thanks for the photos, sometimes I just need to see it to get the whole picture. You are a wealth of good information!

(OT: I was the guy sitting at the bar stool next to you and your son this past year at the Canoecopia BWCA.com dinner. I really enjoyed our talk!)

Dave
 
12/12/2016 09:57PM  
Dave my memory may be bad but I didn't forget a fellow retiree!

butthead
 
gymcoachdon
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12/12/2016 11:01PM  
I discovered on my first trip that I liked the rehydrate in the bag (FBC style) meals the best. For last year's trip I made up several different Knorr's meals, threw in some canned chicken, then dehydrated on my 5 tray Excalibur.

I also made some "hamburger helper" meals, and dehydrated those, along with some chili using my mom's recipe. All were rehydrated on the trip, and tasted great.

I bought the same coffee press, love it, and use it at home to make my coffee. It makes an excellent cup of coffee, and if you throw a hot chocolate pack in there, you can have your Mocha on your canoe trip!
 
Whatsit
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12/12/2016 11:45PM  
quote boonie: "quote Whatsit: "Ala. said on a solo you have very little trash. That is one thing I'm looking forward to my solo. I eat as little as I want. I only have me to worry about. When I'm canoeing in the BWCA I normally don't even feel like eating. There's so much else to do that I eat later I always think, but the others in the group want to make these huge meals which means so much to carry etc. and all the time it takes to prepar and all the clean up. I just may only do solo trips again after this one :-). "


Yeah, that pretty much describes me, Mike, and why I do what I do. My trip isn't about the food - the food is just the fuel. The simpler and lighter it is, the better. It's also fairly tasty, nutritious, and satisfying to me. It's quick, too. "

Boonie I think you and I are a lot alike. I read some of your posts and think "that is exactly what it think" oh well. Good to know I'm not the only one that thinks the way I do sometimes:-)
Mike
 
12/17/2016 02:54PM  
I normally do a STEAK/Hashbrowns/and diced plastic peach cup on first night (spoiled)
Then a main course meal in the evenings are:
Goolash (I brown hamburger/drain it/rinse it and dehydrate it) Then I dehydrate spaggetti sauce. Rehydrate burger, boil noodles of choice, rehydrate sauce, mix and add parmesian cheese.



Another great meal is Knorr's side dish meals I take those and ADD to them to make a complete meal Terryaki Rice or Terryaki Noodles I add dehydrated chicken or Chicken from a foil pouch and dehydrated broccoli and it is to kill for.

Pizza is also a favorite. I take the reflector oven and make pizza and blueberry muffins on layover day.


Another Must for me is pre-cooked bacon/hashbrowns and Pancakes


I take instant oatmeal, and dehydrated strawberries also a good breakfast

Enjoy figuring out your menu, It's always a hoot
SunCatcher
 
cgchase
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12/21/2016 09:27PM  
I keep it super simple when solo in the woods. I don't like cleaning greasy pans, dealing with lots of waste or having to manage lots of ingredients . .like oil and spices, etc, that always manage to spill in my cook kit and make a mess.

The majority of my meals are home dried boil in bag meals. I really like Whole Wheat Penne Pasta w/ ground beef spaghetti sauce. To me, it tastes the best out of all the boil in bag recipes I know . .I tend to eat it like every 3rd night at least, lol.

Another good one is whole wheat pasta with ground turkey, diced tomatoes and whatever frozen veggie mix (southwest, mixed, whatever).

I always bring a couple instant ramens, summer sausage, hard cheese, tortillas, bacon bits, hot sauce packets . .those can always be assembled into some kind of quick meal with or without fish.

For snacks it's beef jerky, crackers, summer sausage, gorp, granola bars , m&m's, etc.

The only hot meal I eat each day is dinner . .typically breakfast and lunch are cold. I tend to eat granola bars for breakfast . .lunch is like a big snack. I tend to drink a lot of coffee . .especially when it's cold out . .so I definitely make coffee at breakfast and lunch and often at snack breaks as well. I tried a few different ways of making coffee outside and what I like best is just to put some grounds in a large cup and pour some boiling water on. Wait a few minutes and then stir . .the grounds go right to the bottom. No need for any special coffee gear, imo.

The one thing I always am tempted to do but never do . .is bring stuff to fry fish. That would be so great! But I always change my mind and don't bring it . .maybe this year!
 
paddlinjoe
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01/22/2017 02:01AM  
quote Alan Gage:

This is 45 days worth of food for Sadie and I from our big trip this summer:



Alan

"


Wow, 45 days! If you had time, it'd be fun to read a trip report about that. I learned a few things just looking at how you've organized your food.

 
01/22/2017 06:28AM  
quote paddlinjoe: "quote Alan Gage:


This is 45 days worth of food for Sadie and I from our big trip this summer:





Alan


"



Wow, 45 days! If you had time, it'd be fun to read a trip report about that. I learned a few things just looking at how you've organized your food.


"


Link to Alan's trip report just a few posts down the page. It's a great report - you'll really enjoy reading it.
 
gkimball
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01/22/2017 08:31PM  
quote Whatsit: "quote TomT: "quote boonie: "quote mastertangler: "Did you guys pick up on what BWCAsolo offered coffee wise? Medaglio Dora is the real deal.......no fuss, no muss.........similar to a via product "



I did, but hadn't had a chance to check it out. I will see if I can get a jar of the instant to try."

That's what Shug drinks with his "pap-tarts". I go with Hodgson Mill oat bran hot cereal. You throw in cereal with water and bring to a boil then simmer 2 minutes. I like it better than the instant Quaker oatmeal. For lunch I kept it simple. I dehydrated fruit and made my own gorp. A company called Usana Health Sciences provided trail bars and protein shake mix. Some peanut butter cookies for dessert."

Have any of you tried the mountain house freezes dried meals?"


I split Mountain House 2 person meals in half and put each half in separate plastic bags. One half is a perfectly sized meal. Re-hydrate in a covered bowl and eat directly from the bowl. Getting it out of the foil pouch saves a lot of space in the bear canister.
 
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