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      What percent of your trip "fun" is the planning process?     
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Derrski
member (14)member
 
02/26/2020 01:56PM
As I'm planning a June BWCA trip with my son, I tell him 50% of the fun is all the planning that goes into the trip.

I suppose some people don't care for the planning, but I enjoy it.

How much do you enjoy the planning/prep?
 
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Blatz
distinguished member(1234)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/26/2020 02:16PM
It's a big part of it especially in the middle of winter.
02/26/2020 02:18PM
I enjoy the planning immensely. Especially on cold winter nights. I must say, it was more fun before the days of “instant information”. It used to take a lot of time finding info on lakes, talking to people on the phone , etc..
SurlyDude
member (34)member
 
02/26/2020 02:34PM
I absolutely love the planning process. The fish are always biting and sun is shinning while I am planning my days on the lake too. I don't think I can really answer the question, but to throw out some percentages I enjoy 95% of the planning process. The only part I don't enjoy about planning is trying to get the whole group on the same page with trip expectations & gear - a tightrope that is hard to walk for someone like me who is a diligent planner with a group that is made up with a lot of fly by the seat of their pants folks. I try to not be overbearing, but I mostly fail at that.
Derrski
member (14)member
 
02/26/2020 03:43PM
Additionally, the planning process I can work on for months, the actual trip is 6 days.
Every lake is full of fish when planning a route. Ha
schweady
distinguished member(6736)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
02/26/2020 04:17PM
Derrski: "...Every lake is full of fish when planning a route. Ha":-)

A slightly belated welcome to the site.
Bearpath9
distinguished member (128)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/26/2020 04:27PM
Blatz: "It's a big part of it especially in the middle of winter." Yup.
bombinbrian
distinguished member (175)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/26/2020 05:25PM
I'm taking the family on a trip last week of June. Two of them, my wife and stepdaughter have never been. I've been working on the trip for about three weeks and will continue for another couple of months.

A lot of mine is educating the girls on what they can bring, what they can't and why. My wife is really into the finding of the food, after she watched a couple of videos and read some things about it.

I'm taking a route that I've done before so I don't have to worry about new areas/portages, while trying to make sure that they are still enjoying the trip. I am looking at different campsites, looking at reviews, the works.

Pretty long winded to say that I enjoy the planning process a lot.
Derrski
member (14)member
 
02/26/2020 07:04PM
schweady: "Derrski: "...Every lake is full of fish when planning a route. Ha":-)

A slightly belated welcome to the site.
"


Many thanks. I'm looking forward to many hours here, learning and sharing.
cyclones30
distinguished member(2054)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/26/2020 07:34PM
The planning and dreaming is what I do the other 95% of the year that I'm not actually on said trip.
02/26/2020 08:19PM
A map is always open next to my desk. I relive and plan trips all year long but am only on the water less than a week. You figure the numbers.
A common warning to new folks in earlier posts was the BWCA is addictive. I think for many of us this forum is part of the year long fix (planning). Welcome to our nightmare.
BigFlounder
member (45)member
 
02/26/2020 09:20PM
Planning is at least 50% of the fun to me. Shopping for new gear that I don't need is a lot of fun too.
bwcadan
distinguished member(1402)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/26/2020 09:25PM
It is difficult to take away anything from the actual trip itself. I would say about 10% planning----90% the trip. Memories for me are a different category.
02/27/2020 03:26AM
I am a huge fan of travel planning. It extends the fun of the trip for me!

I research the areas I want to visit, the landmarks I'd like to see, best places to stay for my itinerary, what to bring, what (where) to eat.



JATFOMike
distinguished member (285)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 04:44AM
given how much time I put into planning....probably 90%! That would include while I am walking the aisles of the grocery stores in the area, looking for new shelf stable food items such as mylar wrapped meats, etc. that I can incorporate inexpensively into the menu....Trader Joes is one of my favorite stores to look for new food stuffs!.....To me, part of the adventure is the drive-up/back....From my home in SW Ohio, there are basically 3 routes to take: 1. most direct thru Chicago and then slant across Wisconsin thru the Dells region (variation is to hit Rockford to avoid Chicago traffic. 2. straight North thru Michigian and cut across UP along Wisconsin Northshore to Duluth, usually involves an overnight in the UP. 3. Straight North to Canada crossing at the Soo and then circling Lake Superior to Grand Marais, overnighting in Canada. My buddies and I like hitting brew pubs for lunch/dinner so once we decide on a route, I am looking for new places to try. Then of course exploring Duluth, ely, GM and places in between! All that definitely takes a lot of "Planning"!

Mike
02/27/2020 05:40AM
I spend a lot of time doing it and enjoy it. It gives me something to do in the winter. I have a long trip there and back (2,500+ miles) like Mike, so lots of opportunities to detour to see things. Plus I take long trips when I get there.
02/27/2020 06:41AM
Similar to JATFOMike, planning the trip and back is also part of the fun for us.

We also travel from Ohio, and have exactly 1,000 miles door to door to the outfitters we use. As such, we always spend one night somewhere on the way to the BWCA, then typically another night at the outfitters bunks.

We've spent a night a Duluth, an night in Grand Marais, a night in Au Claire, etc., on the way up, and enjoy seeing what the different cities have to offer. Going up through the UP is our next adventure. Maybe a night in Mackinac Island?

soundguy0918
member (46)member
 
02/27/2020 07:51AM
Another from Ohio here...the driving time/distance amplifies the need for planning those legs of the journey, and, likewise, our limited amount of time in Ely requires us to have nearly everything ready to go directly into the woods before we even leave home. We plan our route and menu months ahead of time and purchase all of the shelf-stable foods at home, pack the meals in chronological order, and by the time we reach Ely we typically have a one-page shopping list for fresh meats etc. to purchase at Zup's. The rest of the group (who are less involved with planning and outfitting) are responsible for pre-packing their personal gear and then we spend about 2 hours doing final organizing and packing. Then we can all relax and enjoy the trip!
Jaywalker
distinguished member(2026)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 07:57AM
The planning process is easily 50% for me. For me the planning of the next trip literally starts the day my last trips ends - that's when I sit down and make notes of everything that worked well, everything that didn't, and list ideas for improvements - sometimes over my first beer at the Ely Steakhouse or GFT.

It's not specifics like exactly what lake or hopefully which campsite on which day - I don't do much of that. I really like thinking through the process of travel and camping; scrutinizing what I brought or should have brought, better ways to do food, what gear to upgrade, sometimes making or altering gear, learning ways to improve my mediocre fishing skills, etc. Recently I've been thinking through the logistics - food mostly but some gear - on how to go from a 10 day trip to a 17+ day trip.

ZaraSp00k
distinguished member(1400)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 08:19AM
17.39%
unless the trip is mosquito season, then it's 31.09%
A1t2o
distinguished member(920)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 08:44AM
A large portion. I've learned that a person needs to stay busy and have things to look forward to. If you have nothing to do and nothing to look forward to, that is depression. So in the winter/spring I have my boundary waters trip to look forward to, in the summer I stay active outdoors, late summer/fall I plan for hunting, then late fall and early winter is the holidays, which brings me back to planning the next boundary waters trip.

That's why I tend to over plan everything.
danbogey
member (13)member
 
02/27/2020 09:09AM
Derrski: "Additionally, the planning process I can work on for months, the actual trip is 6 days.
Every lake is full of fish when planning a route. Ha"


I'm a fanatic when planning. Maps, food preparation, purchasing gear, watching youtube. My prior life was Military/Special Operations so we did a lot of planning with getting in and getting out. That definitely has carried over to hiking and canoeing. The only covert ops now are hiding the numerous stoves, quilts, hammocks, tents, backpacks and other gear from the wife :)

Hiding the Canoe is going to be the Crème de la crème.

BTW - We are heading to WCPP. Transportation in airlines, car rentals, floatplanes.. are a lot of logistics but well worth it.
HowardSprague
distinguished member(3019)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 09:55AM
Considering half of my trips never materialize, .. about 75%.
HowardSprague
distinguished member(3019)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 09:57AM
bhouse46: " A map is always open next to my desk. I relive and plan trips all year long but am only on the water less than a week. You figure the numbers.
A common warning to new folks in earlier posts was the BWCA is addictive. I think for many of us this forum is part of the year long fix (planning). Welcome to our nightmare."


Well-stated!!
02/27/2020 11:30AM
Basecamp is my go-to daydream apparatus at work. I'd say that planning & the trip are two completely separate entities.
straighthairedcurly
distinguished member (442)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 01:19PM
I don't think I can assign a percent because it depends what you judge it on...the time to plan or the enjoyment. But I can say that when I was young, I put little time or effort into planning other than the basic. Now I love the planning because it keeps me entertained during the winter months. Part of that is the physical preparation, too. Having a goal for a specific challenging trip keeps me motivated to stay in shape.
02/27/2020 01:48PM
When I first started it was more about the trip then planning, then after about twenty trips it was alot of planning and longer trips, now after about fifty trips or more it's more about finding new areas I haven't been, studying maps,I have all the gear I need so packing doesn't take long, more deciding on food, just love being there.
Derrski
member (14)member
 
02/27/2020 03:18PM
If I visit Canoecopia for 3 days, that will skew my planning fun even more!!
Can't wait
jwartman59
distinguished member(3057)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 06:33PM
I get an entry permit, figure out food and hope I can find campsites. What’s to plan?
Ohiopikeman
distinguished member (106)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 09:07PM
Looks like quite a few Ohio folks here with that 1,000 mile one way drive. I'm another from the Akron/Canton area. I too have done the route up through Chicago many times. The route straight up through Michigan and across the UP is much, much nicer, but adds a fair amount of time to the trip. When going this route, we use an overnight stay as well. I have never tried going up through Canada.... looks like I've got some more investigating and planning to do!

While I enjoy the planning part, it's really the actual trip itself that is the most fun for me. The drive through Chicago is NEVER any fun... though hitting Cabelas is always a nice stop. The drive through Michigan is really enjoyable once you get past the Bay City area; the UP is a really nice area.

Dave

carmike
distinguished member(1693)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2020 10:19PM
Probably depends on the trip. I've had some nasty, nasty weather and nasty wind that made the actual trip not much fun at all. In those cases, about 100% of the fun happened prior to getting the canoe in the water. :)
jillpine
distinguished member (408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 04:51AM
Planning is so good that planning for Planning is even fun. Planning for a group versus a trip alone with young kids versus a solo versus other. Time of year, location, duration. Maps, gear, routes, new places, stories from strangers who quickly become someone with whom you share a lot more in common than not. All these different sectors of society that are held together by the common goal of being there instead of here. The state of Planning is a happy place. And when you are done with the trip, sometimes the re-entry is so challenging that the only thing that eases it is.... more planning.
02/28/2020 05:24AM
jwartman59: "I get an entry permit, figure out food and hope I can find campsites. What’s to plan?"

I guess I was always more like this. Spartan1 usually suggested the route, and he did some planning with the Beymer books. Because there were only two of us, and of course we lived in the same house, the planning didn't involve contacting other people or needing big campsites. We never looked at any information about campsites because we enjoyed the surprise of finding them. Spartan1 would do a bit of research about the portages, and once we had a an itinerary for the entire trip, a canoe-trip route in mind (and a permit) I would give some thought to food.

After a few years we had lists for gear, etc., so when packing time came we each had our areas to work on, and mine was always the food.

For us, a canoe trip wasn't a case of "get there and depart, end trip and immediately go back home." We always took extra time to and from the canoe country from Kentucky, central Illinois, and since 1975: south central Michigan. When our kids were still with us, they were dropped off at our friends' home in Minneapolis and we would spend a bit of time there. A 12-day canoe trip for us would involve about 15-17 days from home to back home again, sometimes more. There were some really fun times camping in rustic campgrounds with the kids on the way home through the U. P., too. Now that we do a cabin week with our granddaughter, we still stop every year en route to the north country and visit with our friends (who are now in a senior complex in St. Paul.)

I think it is all very different for those of you who live in Minnesota. A spontaneous weekend trip was out of the question for us. And certainly the planning aspect would vary for those who travel with a larger group. For me, preserving the memories in a photo album, and later on with photo books that I made on Snapfish, was paramount. Planning for next trip, not so much.

I suspect if Spartan1 were to reply to this thread his perspective would be different from mine. That is why we made a good team. :-)
lundojam
distinguished member(2450)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 06:24AM
I used to work with a guy who was pushing 80; I was in my 30's. He told me that when it comes to outoor adventure, 1/3 of the fun is planning, 1/3 is going and doing, and 1/3 is reflecting and storytelling. Throughout a person's life, a different third becomes more heavily weighted and more important. In youth, the doing rules supreme. In the middle, as we take on responsibility, we plan more and need the escape it provides more. In our later years, recollection and retelling becomes more practical and more cherished. Each are important to the community.
I think about that often. Thanks, Lee, you old shotgunner.

So, 33.
bombinbrian
distinguished member (175)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 10:15AM
I've already replied once but...

Last year my son wanted to do a trip that included two trip we did as a family. The trip would just be the two of us and he wanted to cover all of the ground we did in two trips in a one trip timeframe. I spent hours upon hours setting up the route. I then spent hours and hours and hours planning the gear and food since we had to single portage to make it happen. I had so much fun trying to make his wish come true.

Then we set out in 40* weather, spitting rain, wind blowing 20 mph. We made it three days before we gave up. The day after we left the area got nasty thunderstorms for the next 4 days and the temps hoovered around 35*.

This year we are taking the wife and stepdaughter with us on their first trip. I'm planning the packs now. I add this and that, then I weigh it. I'll make changes and weigh it again. Unfortunately, I think I'll be done with the packing portion in a few days then I just get to work out and be ready.
fishonfishoff
distinguished member(523)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 11:17AM
SurlyDude: "I absolutely love the planning process. The fish are always biting and sun is shinning while I am planning my days on the lake too. I don't think I can really answer the question, but to throw out some percentages I enjoy 95% of the planning process. The only part I don't enjoy about planning is trying to get the whole group on the same page with trip expectations & gear - a tightrope that is hard to walk for someone like me who is a diligent planner with a group that is made up with a lot of fly by the seat of their pants folks. I try to not be overbearing, but I mostly fail at that."

It's like you took the words right out of my thick skull! "Could you be my brother from a different mother?"
inspector13
distinguished member(3945)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 11:57AM

~7%. And I justify my enjoyment of spontaneity on Robert Burn’s dozen score old musing:
But Mousie, thou art no thy-lane, in proving foresight may be vain;
The best laid schemes o' mice an' men gang aft agley, an' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!

jillpine
distinguished member (408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2020 12:35PM
inspector13: "
~7%. And I justify my enjoyment of spontaneity on Robert Burn’s dozen score old musing:
But Mousie, thou art no thy-lane, in proving foresight may be vain;
The best laid schemes o' mice an' men gang aft agley, an' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!
"


And best wishes and intentions that the other 93% is not this:
An' forward, tho' I canna see,
I guess an' fear!

Paddle on! :)
x2jmorris
distinguished member(1078)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2020 07:28AM
I detest the planning. I wish all my gear, fishing gear and enough food was just magically put into my car so I could just go.
Tlaker1225
 
02/29/2020 08:43AM
Planning is what gets me through to the next adventure.
TreeBear
member (35)member
 
02/29/2020 11:50AM
As others have said, the planning is addictive and borders on a problem (I don't want to admit how much time was spent with the maps last winter.) Then I get back from trips, and then there is just as much time processing it (going through pictures, journals, and putting the new information into the spreadsheet.) Yes, there is a spreadsheet now. It just keeps growing. Now it includes lakes visited, percentage of total lakes visited, lakes visited by means of access (hike, snowshoe, aluminum canoe, kevlar canoe, tuff weave canoe, and fiberglass canoe), unfinished business (places I need to go back to), a log of trips taken (including mileage, number of portages, portage rods, nights stayed, dates of the trip, entry and exit points, and lakes visited), entry points visited (and percentage of total), my top 10s (favorite lakes, portages, campsites, topographic oddities, trees, and rivers and streams), and a list of things I particularly want to go see. So, yes, planning is fun, and a problem, but I think the reflecting is beginning to rival it for me.
analyzer
distinguished member(1672)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2020 12:43PM
SurlyDude: "I absolutely love the planning process. The fish are always biting and sun is shining while I am planning "

That's soooo true!!

I like the planning because i get to think about the BWCA everyday for months. It gets me through the winter blahs, and tough days at work.

analyzer
distinguished member(1672)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2020 12:48PM
Last year, my wife was just laughing at me, and enjoying the process. She said it was like Christmas, every week, for 3 months. Something different shows up at the front door, every few days.

I was updating some of my gear,and getting lighter for a portage trip. I was ordering all kinds of things on line, expeds, down sleeping bags, light weight chairs, light weight stove, mountain house meals etc, and they would randomly show up at the door. She just giggled. "oooh, what did we get today?"

I think she had as much fun as I did.

Derrski
member (14)member
 
03/01/2020 11:24AM
I love the planning, it extends the trip enjoyment by multiples,
However I sometimes think I over analyze. For example, if I plan on an overnight at a certain lake, I research the feedback on the campsites for that lake and use that info to prioritize my site selection.

Pre internet (the good old days) it was more "on the fly" site selection.

Fearlessleader
distinguished member (124)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2020 12:36PM
Fascinating to see how many other folks from Ohio are making the regular trip up to the BWCA. When you are driving a thousand plus miles the planning needs to be an enjoyable part of the trip. That way even if the weather doesn’t cooperate and the fish don’t bite you can get months of fun out of it.

As many have said the route through the UP is much prettier than going through Chicago. If you have time or would like to take a northern Quetico trip going up through the Soo and across the north shore of Superior is a beautiful trip. So much wonderful scenery and nobody home!!
03/01/2020 01:31PM
Fearlessleader: "Fascinating to see how many other folks from Ohio are making the regular trip up to the BWCA. When you are driving a thousand plus miles the planning needs to be an enjoyable part of the trip. That way even if the weather doesn’t cooperate and the fish don’t bite you can get months of fun out of it.


As many have said the route through the UP is much prettier than going through Chicago. If you have time or would like to take a northern Quetico trip going up through the Soo and across the north shore of Superior is a beautiful trip. So much wonderful scenery and nobody home!!"


We loved that trip across the northern shore of Lake Superior in Canada--much better than the U. P., IMHO. We had spots that we loved to stop, at waterfalls, at certain restaurants, for lodging. We didn't find that it took that much longer than going across the U. P., and we enjoyed the scenery.

Now we take our granddaughter with us for a cabin week every summer. Because she lives in a Chicago suburb, we must go through Chicago. Not as scenic, but it works.
papalambeau
member (9)member
 
03/02/2020 09:08AM
I agree with lundojam that most trips can be divided up 1/3 planning, 1/3 doing and 1/3 reflecting. And as I get older the 1/3 reflecting is taking on more and more significance but I always love the planning and anticipation.
mgraber
distinguished member(1024)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/04/2020 09:15PM
I don't have a percentage, but planning (and daydreaming) is a very large part of the enjoyment. Maybe 30% ?
Bushman
distinguished member (207)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/07/2020 04:50AM
I have a few OCD tendencies when it comes to planning and will go over multiple scenarios in my head and then extrapolate the best one and then re-figure that one a bit more.

However, after two trips on my log book (I know, not much) I have pretty much figured out where my boundaries are for what I want out of the trip and what I need.

I live in Michigan and while it is still a 14 hour drive I am looking for the fastest most direct route and Chicago is not it I don't care what Map Quest says.
We drive straight north (we are just south of Lansing a few clicks) and cross the Mighty Mac and either head across the UP via highway 2 or cut up and take 41 across. The traffic on 2 can get pretty congested with the tourists and weekenders hugging the lake shore across the top of Lake Michigan.

All of my planning now deals with routing strategies, campsites and menus.
I watch a ton of youtube videos and read all the trip reports I can get my hands on relating to the areas I'm visiting. You can get a lot of info in the background of someone's fish photo.

I do love to plan but my group mates don't seem to be as interested as I am. Perhaps they're just confident I will make the right choices or just dont care as much. Who knows?

Most of my gear is stored in my portage packs and blue barrel and all I need to do is pack it. This year we have some long portages and the goal is to single carry so that is most of my planning for this years trip.

To each his own and remember it's the journey not the destination.
In this case the journey begins as soon as you decide to take a trip.

mooseplums
distinguished member(10108)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/10/2020 09:55PM
I've become very spontaneous over the years, and do very little planning anymore.
All of my gear is stored in tubs, and can be packed up in a couple hours. The last few years, I have laid no expectations on where I'm going beyond the entry point.
I stop and camp for the night when I'm ready to stop, don't don't stick to a specific itinerary anymore. To me it makes the trip much more enjoyable.
I used to be a voracious planner, but not anymore
gvpant
member (18)member
 
03/11/2020 01:40PM
Love planning for the BWCA! Going in mid May, so time to get started!
03/11/2020 07:55PM
Lots of time goes into planning, usually starting in December or January with comments like "we haven't hit the east side of Quetico in a few years". Then we pull out the maps, start dreaming of routes in the 100-125 mile range for a 10-day trip. In late February or early March we call our outfitter and talk about a couple Quetico entry lakes and dates, and keep looking at maps for route ideas. When we get concrete permit info (entry lake/date/etc) we play more with the maps and on a couple planning sites to firm up route ideas.

Two days before our entry date we hit the road, traveling the 1250 miles from western NC to Ely. When we hit Ely, our outfitter gives us updates on Quetico conditions and critiques our route plan. When we pick up our permits at Prairie Portage, we may discover that we're entering under a fire ban or have other restrictions that prevent using the route as planned. Or we may hit weather that slows us down, and a 100+ mile route is trimmed in a place or two. I'm not sure we've ever completed the exact route we planned on any Canoe Country visit in the past 40 years, but they've all been fun to plan and fun to execute.

TZ
OldGreyGoose
distinguished member(1705)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/12/2020 11:36AM
As I've gotten older (and wiser?) less and less planning. I learned the hard way too much planning can make the actual trip anticlimactic. ??
--Goose
nooneuno
distinguished member (479)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/12/2020 06:04PM
I can decide to go on Thursday after work and leave after work on Friday. I know what I want to bring and can be packed in 1/2 hour, a quick trip to the grocery an I'm ready. I don't care about specific routes, sights. or campsites, choose a destination and go....
nooneuno
distinguished member (479)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/12/2020 06:04PM
Sorry double post
 
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