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Captn Tony
distinguished member(1440)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/18/2020 06:48AM
Which length Irwin saw should I purchase - 15" or 20"?

Thanks.
 
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PortageKeeper
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05/18/2020 07:12AM
9 out of 10 get the 15". This is long enough for almost all sawing and it packs nicely.
 
Castaway
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05/18/2020 07:14AM
The 15” is the most popular by far.
 
ashlandjack
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05/18/2020 07:53AM
Which model of Irwin Saw?
 
05/18/2020 09:12AM
The IRWIN Tools Marathon 2011201 15-inch ProTouch Coarse Cut Saw is what I have and like! Particularly proud of the Ragged-made sheath.



butthead
 
schweady
distinguished member(6989)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
05/18/2020 11:12AM
Yup. 15" coarse cut. That's the one.

Of course, I've found a saw I like even better....... But, I'll let you do your own searching on this board...
 
fishonfishoff
distinguished member(609)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/18/2020 01:39PM


Same saw as Butthead, different protective device.
 
05/18/2020 04:20PM
Why would someone want this saw for the BWCA over a backpacking saw that can collapse into itself and take up less room?

This seems like the complete opposite of what you would want in terms of savings space and such?
 
05/18/2020 07:03PM
A lot of the backpacking saws are great, maybe lighter weight, cut well, and pack up smaller. The Irwin is basically flat, so the space saving is negligible. The best, smallest, sharpest, lightest, backpacking saws also come with some hefty prices. They also come with hinges, or moving joints that are in fact, weak joints, and other mechanisms to hold it together. If one of those joints fail, the saw is shot. With the Irwin, there is no assembly required, and you can't beat the price.
 
05/18/2020 09:55PM
I laughed when I first saw this come up several years ago. I had burned through several folding and lightweight saws and the ones with the ability to cut bigger pieces of wood never seemed to cut straight or bound up easily. I figured I had nothing to lose, so I bought a 15" Irwin, as well. Lo and behold, that was about six years ago and I'm still on the first one! I came back with my tail between my legs and let everyone that's interested know that they'll love this saw.

I'm not sure if Ragged still makes sheaths, but they're worth every penny and you can slip the saw on the side of any pack since it's very thin and the weight is a non issue.


This was a downed cedar tree that was about 12" in diameter and lasted a whole trip for us.
 
schweady
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05/18/2020 10:47PM
lyontyl: "Why would someone want this saw for the BWCA over a backpacking saw that can collapse into itself and take up less room?

This seems like the complete opposite of what you would want in terms of savings space and such?"

It's pretty flat, actually.
 
houseofspam
senior member (86)senior membersenior member
 
05/18/2020 10:52PM
lyontyl: "Why would someone want this saw for the BWCA over a backpacking saw that can collapse into itself and take up less room?

This seems like the complete opposite of what you would want in terms of savings space and such?"

I think the logic is the opposite for canoe camping. There's no reason to use a backpacking saw unless you're extremely concerned with space and weight. Most canoe campers aren't.

As stated by Knoozer: the weight and space savings is minimal. The cost difference can be significant. The backpacking saws also many more failure modes.

I carry a 21" Corona razor tooth. It'll saw through a 2x4 in about 10 seconds. I collect plenty of wood left by previous campers that was too large for their saw.
 
05/19/2020 08:40AM
Great thanks!
 
05/19/2020 09:56AM
I have 2 collapsing backpacker saws. The 15 inch Irwin is a bit lighter at 14.8 ounces

1pound 10 ounces in the sheath.
The length falls between the backpacking saws. Obviously the Irwin is wider but essentially not noticed on the side of my pack.
The backpacking saws now gather dust and the Irwin gets carried/used.

butthead
 
AmarilloJim
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05/19/2020 04:06PM
 
BearBurrito
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05/19/2020 04:25PM
butthead: "The IRWIN Tools Marathon 2011201 15-inch ProTouch Coarse Cut Saw is what I have and like! Particularly proud of the Ragged-made sheath.



butthead"


That is the one I have as well. Except I haven't been able to get my hands on a Ragged sheath yet.
 
OldScout48
distinguished member (358)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/19/2020 06:36PM
The 15 inch model seems to do the job. Price is good, pretty much takes care of most wood cutting jobs and it just seems to keep going.


Here is a picture of my saw and sheath.


The sheath is just a flexible cutting board (the thicker, the better) that is folded in half long ways using a hot air gun to heat the plastic. Be careful with the heat as you can easily melt the plastic.

I put a 1/4" thick wooden spacer inside the fold while heating it to give the sheath room for the saw teeth to move in and out. I then used the cardboard packing sheath to mark the lines to cut the edges of the sheath, give yourself an extra 1/4" to 3/8" so the you have room for the pop rivets.

Add some webbing and a buckle and you are set to go. The other part of the buckle is on the other side of the sheath.
 
gymcoachdon
distinguished member(521)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/19/2020 09:47PM
The one big advantage for me using the Irwin is that there is no assembly required. I take my large pack over a portage first, and it has my small forest axe on one side, and the Irwin on the other. They both tuck into the compression straps nicely.

If I run in to a down tree on the trail, it is easy to slip the saw out and start cutting. I then know i have a clear path when I come back with the canoe. I do not have a sheath, I just reinforced the cardboard cover it came in with some duct tape! Still going 3 years later.

I will say that I have only had to clear a portage twice, once in early June in the Q, and once in WCPP, also in June. It is still really handy processing firewood in camp.
 
Unas10
distinguished member(1379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/20/2020 05:05AM
OldScout48: "The 15 inch model seems to do the job. Price is good, pretty much takes care of most wood cutting jobs and it just seems to keep going.


Here is a picture of my saw and sheath.



The sheath is just a flexible cutting board (the thicker, the better) that is folded in half long ways using a hot air gun to heat the plastic. Be careful with the heat as you can easily melt the plastic.

I put a 1/4" thick wooden spacer inside the fold while heating it to give the sheath room for the saw teeth to move in and out. I then used the cardboard packing sheath to mark the lines to cut the edges of the sheath, give yourself an extra 1/4" to 3/8" so the you have room for the pop rivets.

Add some webbing and a buckle and you are set to go. The other part of the buckle is on the other side of the sheath. "


Love the creativity.
 
pamonster
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05/21/2020 03:00PM
Another Irwin saw with the Ragged sheath here.

Also use Sven, Bahco, Silky but tend to favor the Irwin. I like the handle. Much easier saw for me to use efficiently in my off hand too.

As for packing; it fits great in or out of a pack. Honestly if you cant figure out how to pack a thin little saw like this you've got bigger problems.

If going ultralight then no saw. But I was born in the north and a good axe and saw in the boreal forest is just how I like it.
 
WhiteWolf
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05/22/2020 12:53AM
pamonster: "Another Irwin saw with the Ragged sheath here.


Also use Sven, Bahco, Silky but tend to favor the Irwin. I like the handle. Much easier saw for me to use efficiently in my off hand too.


As for packing; it fits great in or out of a pack. Honestly if you cant figure out how to pack a thin little saw like this you've got bigger problems.


If going ultralight then no saw. But I was born in the north and a good axe and saw in the boreal forest is just how I like it. "


+1.
also thanks to Mitch (DicecupMaker) RIP. for making an awesome sheath. Seen below laying on log.

I will add that heavily used sites that are very picked over for wood- an Irwin saw and axe can make a big difference in time it takes to produce good dry wood.
 
05/22/2020 03:14PM
Get a Agawa Canyon Boreal 21 saw. I have the Irwin and the sheath also, but they have gathered dust since I purchased the Agawa. 17 ounces. Agawa
 
unshavenman
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05/23/2020 09:40AM
Frenchy19: "Get a Agawa Canyon Boreal 21 saw. I have the Irwin and the sheath also, but they have gathered dust since I purchased the Agawa. 17 ounces. Agawa "
Same with me. Frenchy and I seem to be of like minds on a lot of things......
 
joewildlife
distinguished member (496)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/31/2020 04:22AM
I started with a Bob Dustrude saw and love it. I was interested in the Irwin and got one along with the awesome sheath. I brought it a few times and it worked great. Then I put a new blade on the Dustrude and it has made the last few trips. I make the decision on what to use before every trip, and won't part with either. I find a good small camp axe, a favorite saw, and a pair of leather gloves to round out a nice piece of kit.
Joe
 
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