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missmolly
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10/14/2020 05:35PM
I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?
 
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bobbernumber3
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10/14/2020 06:47PM
 
airmorse
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10/14/2020 07:44PM
bobbernumber3: " "

What he said.

Beautiful fish!!!
 
missmolly
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10/14/2020 08:07PM
airmorse: "bobbernumber3: " "


What he said.


Beautiful fish!!!"


Beautiful, for sure, but so is a pumpkinseed and they don't inspire devotees like trout do.
 
10/14/2020 08:23PM
For me it is the hunt to find them. I so enjoy bushwhacking to small streams for Brookies ,hiking to secluded mountain streams for rainbows, Browns, and cutthroat. Lake Trout fishing is also one of my passions ! Nothing like fighting a BIG LAKER from a solo canoe!
 
jhb8426
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10/15/2020 12:17AM
Because they taste so good. What's not to like?
 
outsidethebox
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10/15/2020 07:06AM
walllee: "For me it is the hunt to find them. I so enjoy bushwhacking to small streams for Brookies ,hiking to secluded mountain streams for rainbows, Browns, and cutthroat. Lake Trout fishing is also one of my passions ! Nothing like fighting a BIG LAKER from a solo canoe! "

For all the reasons mentioned and more. I agree here-nothing better than bushwhacking for brookies on small streams. I believe there is something that ties into our primal nature with this quest. As my brother stated, while heading out into the BWCA last month, "I think brook trout would be considered our family fish". And the joy we experienced as we caught about 30 fifteen to nineteen inchers over two days confirms this. And I cannot imagine a better tasting, eating fish.
 
A1t2o
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10/15/2020 08:27AM
It's a beautiful, great tasting, and big enough to eat fish. Throw in the multiple different species and color patterns for enthusiasts to go crazy about. It checks all the boxes. No matter what reason you are fishing, trout is a good fish to catch.

Pumpkin seed sunfish might look great too, but they are not that big. It's hard to find one big enough to feed one person, much less one person per fillet. Then you have to descale it too. Trout don't have scales so their skin is edible without any extra prep work and they can be big enough to feed 1 person per fillet.

It is just a good fish all around.
 
Driftless
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10/15/2020 08:50AM
Because they live in the most beautiful places!
 
smoke11
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10/15/2020 11:45AM
because it means spending time with son
 
ericinely
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10/15/2020 12:53PM
I am surprised you are asking; those who have caught all those species usually don't need an explanation as to why they are more fun to chase than most other species.

I especially like targeting them in the winter when everything else is docile and tedious to target. Since they are a cold/deep water fish, they are every bit as active in the winter as they are summer, and always tenacious.

In my opinion (other than smallmouth, maybe) pound for pound there is no freshwater fish that fights like trout. I love watching them underwater, behaving like sharks, swimming in circles, darting in and out and finally committing and hammering a bait.

In my opinion, a 30" lake trout fights every bit as good as a 40" pike. The way lake trout fight, with the violent head shakes and the vertical runs is super exciting.

Last but not least, what other fish is willing (and able) to follow your bait from depth of 100+ feet, just to commit and inhale your bait 2' under the ice/boat? In the winter, I have caught Lake trout two feet under the ice, and 100 feet down in the same day...

 
papalambeau
member (16)member
 
10/15/2020 01:53PM
Because they come out of the purest waters and the most beautiful regions of our country that can only be reached by canoe or hiking:
- Lakers - our beloved BWCAW
- Cutthroats - the mountains of Colorado
- Brookies, Browns - the streams and spring ponds of Wisconsin
- Rainbows - the hard to get to secret gems of northern -----------

And the pic sent in by bobbernumber3 is worth a thousand words!
 
barehook
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10/15/2020 02:45PM
missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?"

The mystery of fishing, for sure. Great answers appear in this thread re: trout. But you could have just as easily substituted, "why some fishers love smallmouth, walleye, catfish, crappie, bluegill, pike, white bass, largemouth....and yes...(if European especially) carp?" Each of these species has dedicated fishermen that will avidly pursue them above all the other options. Who knows why? As I've aged I've become more content to 'live and let live' when it comes to preferred species. And personally, more and more I just enjoy fishing, whatever the species.
 
Frankie_Paull
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10/15/2020 03:18PM
missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?" What’s your preferred fish ?
 
h20
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10/15/2020 04:01PM
Because Fall brookies are the prettiest fish on the planet and stream fishing for them puts me in the middle of nowhere...my favorite spot.
 
bobbernumber3
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10/15/2020 05:03PM
missmolly: "Beautiful, for sure, but so is a pumpkinseed and they don't inspire devotees like trout do. "

I like them both!! They are both great tasting fish and fun to catch!
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6952)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/15/2020 06:13PM
Frankie_Paull: "missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?" What’s your preferred fish ?"

I like the pugnacity of muskies.

I like the aerobatics of smallmouth.

I like the spunk of bluegills.

I like species, like bluefish and striped bass, that school and feed enmasse, letting you catch one after another after another.

I would love to catch arctic char and Atlantic salmon one day.
 
thegildedgopher
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10/15/2020 07:37PM
Lots of good answers.

For me trout were the first non-panfish that I chased as a kid. We’d go visit my grandparents on their farm in wisco and grandma would take us to the creek on their property and we’d catch brook and brown trout on our Zebco reels. So trout have always been special to me.

Another reason for me is that being dedicated to chasing trout takes me to the places I want to spend my time like the BW. It forces me to take trips. Living near the Mississippi in the twin cities I have access to one of the great multi species fisheries around, so I pretty much fish the river exclusively. It’s good to have a reason to go to beautiful places!
 
Gunwhale
member (7)member
 
10/15/2020 09:58PM
Because trout live in beautiful places.
 
Basspro69
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10/16/2020 12:01AM
missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?"
It’s not only because they are beautiful fish it’s just as much the places where they live !
 
Basspro69
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10/16/2020 12:08AM
bobbernumber3: " "
Gorgeous Brookie. No fish ever created is as beautiful as a Brookie in fall.
 
10/16/2020 07:23AM
missmolly: "airmorse: "bobbernumber3: " "



What he said.



Beautiful fish!!!"



Beautiful, for sure, but so is a pumpkinseed and they don't inspire devotees like trout do. "


No pumpkinseed looks as beautiful as that fish! As others stated it is the fact they aren’t everywhere. I can catch bass, walleye, northern, sunfish etc...anywhere I practically go. I have to make an effort/plan to find a lake that has them, let alone try to figure out how to catch them.

T
 
lundojam
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10/16/2020 08:36AM
Trout are surely beautiful, but not more beautiful than bluegills or pumpkinseeds. There s a bit of elitsm around trout. Fly-fishing has upper class roots; it probably has something to do with that. It is interesting how we assign desirability to plants and animals. I remember when I found out dandelions were undesirable; I was shocked.
 
thegildedgopher
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10/16/2020 09:21AM
missmolly: "Every time you post at bwca.com, you run the risk of missing some neighborhood kids crossing your lawn. Do you really want to continue taking that chance? "

LOL

lundojam: "Trout are surely beautiful, but not more beautiful than bluegills or pumpkinseeds. There s a bit of elitsm around trout. Fly-fishing has upper class roots; it probably has something to do with that. It is interesting how we assign desirability to plants and animals. I remember when I found out dandelions were undesirable; I was shocked."

I think that's valid for sure. If you look at all the colors on a bluegill -- and when you start seeing all that shimmering purple -- they're really beautiful fish. The beauty of trout doesn't have much to do with why I chase them personally. The beauty of their home lakes, yes.

On the "class" comment -- entirely possible there's some of that going on.
 
missmolly
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10/16/2020 10:41AM
Isn't this one a beauty?

And here's a gorgeous longear.

I agree that class is in play. The lords of England caught trout while everyone else fished for carp and it's still that way today.
 
shock
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10/16/2020 12:37PM
bobbernumber3: " "
WOW! Was that caught this year? That pic is as SWEET as it gets. Congratulations!
 
A1t2o
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10/16/2020 12:56PM
Sorry, but I'm not seeing it with the sunfish. I think it is the body shape and how common they are. I go off of any dock and start catching sunfish, they are like pigeons or seagulls. It is similar to the difference between deer and moose.
 
barehook
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10/16/2020 03:48PM
missmolly: " Isn't this one a beauty?


And here's a gorgeous longear.


I agree that class is in play. The lords of England caught trout while everyone else fished for carp and it's still that way today. "


Author John Gierach, the best fly/trout fishing author I know bar none, has a wonderful chapter in one of his books on fly fishing for big carp. He can "match the hatch' with the best of them, and yet somehow stays down to earth and "non-elite". It fits his upbringing as a serious hippie type from the late 60's/early 70's. He's a must read for trout aficionados....and those who aren't.
 
PineKnot
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10/16/2020 04:41PM
missmolly: " Isn't this one a beauty?


And here's a gorgeous longear.


I agree that class is in play. The lords of England caught trout while everyone else fished for carp and it's still that way today. "


All I know is some of my fondest fishing memories are as a kid catching sunfish with my dad in the summer....
 
10/16/2020 08:50PM
I grew up a few hundred yards from an beautiful little trout stream. That sticks with you.

My oldest friends and I have a yearly gathering we call Trout Camp. In the early years it was about the cold, wet, May openers. Beer all night and wet lines all day. As it has evolved, our yearly camps are more about state forests, paddling day trips, and telling stories about the old days around the fire while the children roll their eyes. We pick a new place to pitch our tents and trailers every 2 or 3 years, we're on a 29 year streak.

Trout life is a good life.
 
Zwater
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10/16/2020 09:19PM
fadersup: "I grew up a few hundred yards from an beautiful little trout stream. That sticks with you.


My oldest friends and I have a yearly gathering we call Trout Camp. In the early years it was about the cold, wet, May openers. Beer all night and wet lines all day. As it has evolved, our yearly camps are more about state forests, paddling day trips, and telling stories about the old days around the fire while the children roll their eyes. We pick a new place to pitch our tents and trailers every 2 or 3 years, we're on a 29 year streak.


Trout life is a good life. "

That's what it is all about! Deer camp! Elk camp! Trout camp!
Never heard of sunfish camp..
 
TuscaroraBorealis
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10/17/2020 10:48AM
As a general rule I'd say location they're caught as well.

Also, a lake trout was the very 1st fish my daughter caught when she was 3.
 
bobbernumber3
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10/17/2020 11:50AM
missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?"

If you were listing bass, I would understand your question and perlexion… I've never understood why so many fishers love bass, but I don't really care to know.
 
missmolly
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10/17/2020 11:59AM
bobbernumber3: "missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?"


If you were listing bass, I would understand your question and perlexion… I've never understood why so many fishers love bass, but I don't really care to know."


Incuriouser and incuriouser.
 
10/18/2020 10:25AM
bobbernumber3: "missmolly: "I've caught lake trout, rainbows, brookies, and brown trout, but I've never understood why so many fishers love trout above all. Can someone help me see?"


If you were listing bass, I would understand your question and perlexion… I've never understood why so many fishers love bass, but I don't really care to know."


LOL!
 
10/18/2020 10:30AM
lundojam: "Trout are surely beautiful, but not more beautiful than bluegills or pumpkinseeds. There s a bit of elitsm around trout. Fly-fishing has upper class roots; it probably has something to do with that. It is interesting how we assign desirability to plants and animals. I remember when I found out dandelions were undesirable; I was shocked."

In the US the desirability is associated due to the accessibility and elusiveness. How many times do people post on this website about trying to catch their first trout? Happens all the time. When has anyone ever posted about still trying to catch their first pumpkinseed? Doesn’t make a pumpkinseed undesirable or even less... As far as the “class comment” and elitism...maybe...but I don’t think so...In Europe and especially England yes that is true historically. People on this website that I know that pursue trout...NO WAY!—-there is more complexity to it than that. Full disclosure I am not a trout guy.

T
 
lundojam
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10/18/2020 11:14AM
Interesting question for sure. T, you are surely correct about supply and demand. Rare things are more highly valued. I grew up on a lake with trout stocked every spring, but no walleyes. I value walleyes very highly compared to stocked trout, and I'm sure that has something to do with it. I do value naturally-occurring trout more highly than stocked trout as well, which isn't to say I don't love those bushwhack-y portages to put-and-take brook trout lakes. I do love those lakes and their fish.
(Anyway, to each their own. I'll stick to my theory about British Empire elitism and fly-fishing. Lots of the things we value as a culture have been passed down from that tradition. It's nothing to be ashamed of. Keeping a nice lawn, for example, is totes Brit, as is getting dressed up for the theater or a nice restaurant. It's my belief that keeping your house spotless started out with folks wanting to make it look like they had "help" which couldn't be more British Empire. But I digress.)
Walleye make me happiest. Trout are right up there though.
 
Duff
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10/18/2020 11:26AM
I just fish, most all species, legless salamanders included... from the streams of SE Minnesota to the frozen lakes of shield country. And all territory in between. My two favorite beautiful fish are the Brookie and Pumpkinseed.

Caught my first Tiger Trout last year, another pretty fish to add to the favorites list.



 
missmolly
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10/18/2020 12:02PM
I side with lundojam. Faulkner's most quoted line is "The past is never dead. It's not even past,"

We ferried all that classicism across the pond.

If rarity were the driver of the trout's appeal, I would have to have taken a number when I fished the only two lakes in the world for the Aurora trout (You are allowed to catch one. So, you hook one, whether you keep it or not, and you're done.). However, I was the only one there and by the looks of the shoreline and the access road, I was the only one there in a long time.

If beauty were the determiner, like Duff, fishers would love the Pumpkinseed as much as the brook trout and they'd love many tropical fish even more.

If the beauty of the location were what matters, fishers would wax about pike, which live in many of the same lakes.

T, it's nice swell to be disagreeing with you again. Sadly, as always, you are wrong. ;-)
 
missmolly
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10/18/2020 01:38PM
 
GunflintTrailAngler
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10/18/2020 02:10PM
Because trout don’t live in ugly places!
 
jillpine
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10/19/2020 05:43PM
It's a sublime question, as are some of the responses.
Like others, I enjoy the special places I go to find them. I admire them as an apex predator in the little river on which I live. When I changed to solo paddling in 2019, fishing made me lonesome for my boys-now-busy-men, except trout fishing. Never thought about that until now. FWIW, Miss Maven Molly, I no longer mow most of the yard either.
 
missmolly
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10/19/2020 08:39PM
Jillpine, since I've already tapped Carroll, Faulkner, and Shakespeare, I'll reply to you through Dickens: "Maven? I'm more an undigested bit of brass, a crumb of dumb, a fragment of underdone thinking. There's more of Wavy Gravy than of mavey about me."
 
10/20/2020 07:33AM
missmolly: "I side with lundojam. Faulkner's most quoted line is "The past is never dead. It's not even past,"

T, it's nice swell to be disagreeing with you again. Sadly, as always, you are wrong. ;-)"

Ha...I almost always agree with your point...the logic of how you got to it or the innuendos behind it always drags the devil's advocate out of me. :)

Just like on this... I am NOT a trout guy, but I take the people I know, the people on this site, at their word and can see their side and not generalize based on feudal England in 1500s.

BTW the rich didn’t cross over the pond to fish. They didn’t need or want to. They had everything the common man did because they weren’t allowed in Europe.

T
 
thegildedgopher
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10/20/2020 08:03AM
This thread cemented my desire to chase brookies and/or splake this year. :)
 
missmolly
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10/20/2020 09:14AM
timatkn: "missmolly: "I side with lundojam. Faulkner's most quoted line is "The past is never dead. It's not even past,"

T, it's nice swell to be disagreeing with you again. Sadly, as always, you are wrong. ;-)"

Ha...I almost always agree with your point...the logic of how you got to it or the innuendos behind it always drags the devil's advocate out of me. :)

Just like on this... I am NOT a trout guy, but I take the people I know, the people on this site, at their word and can see their side and not generalize based on feudal England in 1500s.

BTW the rich didn’t cross over the pond to fish. They didn’t need or want to. They had everything the common man did because they weren’t allowed in Europe.

T"


Logic? As I already stated, I am "a crumb of dumb."

GG, I also love the look of splake.
 
10/20/2020 09:56AM
As others have said, the places where they live. I do a whole lot more fishing than catching, and I don't fish much, these days. Having said that, I did once enjoy catching a trout in Decorah, Iowa, in site of a car dealership... but Decorah is special.
 
zski
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10/20/2020 04:55PM
Growing up on the south side of Chicago I'd take the fly rod out to the local ponds with a can of corn and catch what we called 'green trout'
...but alas, they were carp.
 
jillpine
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10/20/2020 06:15PM
missmolly: "Jillpine, since I've already tapped Carroll, Faulkner, and Shakespeare, I'll reply to you through Dickens: "Maven? I'm more an undigested bit of brass, a crumb of dumb, a fragment of underdone thinking. There's more of Wavy Gravy than of mavey about me."".
OK then. How about Dickinson's reason for the love of trout?
The Sea said "Come" to the Brook. (Trout)
Always the riddler, she wrote a wonderful poem of the sea encouraging the trout to see the world. And here we are, fishers telling tales of the places we see when looking for trout. Perhaps feudalism. Certainly poetry.
 
lundojam
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10/24/2020 07:39AM
MM, nice Dickinson. Faulkner: "My mother is a fish."
 
airmorse
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10/24/2020 08:13AM
rtallent: "As others have said, the places where they live. I do a whole lot more fishing than catching, and I don't fish much, these days. Having said that, I did once enjoy catching a trout in Decorah, Iowa, in site of a car dealership... but Decorah is special."

I love fishing that area.

Bloody Run

Sny Magill

Paint and Little Paint

Soo many other small streams.

I have always said you don't fish for trout (especially Brook Trout) you hunt them.
 
thegildedgopher
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10/24/2020 10:35AM
lundojam: "MM, nice Dickinson. Faulkner: "My mother is a fish." "

Good ol Vardaman. Or more like poor lil Vardaman.
 
mooseplums
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10/24/2020 02:08PM
This is why
Splake and Brookies
 
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