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espezial
member (7)member
 
06/19/2022 09:53PM  
Going on a trip with a handful of portages. Do you prefer a two-piece in a hard case, one of those multi piece guys safety broken down and stored, or do you ride dirty with your rig and just hope it doesn’t get wrecked during travel? Obviously would prefer that, but seems like a really bad idea with our group.

(Links to suggestions appreciated.) Thanks.
 
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jwettelrin89
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/19/2022 10:07PM  
I like to take the reels off and store those in the packs and then we secure the fishing rods underneeth the thwart/yolk right along the gunwales with a little bit of gorilla tape. Works pretty good for us, haven't broken one yet and we don't even notice them on the portage. I suppose it is a little risky putting all our eggs in one basket with all the rods stacked up like that.

We also basecamp, and only fish once we finish all of our portages so if you're portaging a little bit every day and using the rods between portages its probably easier to just carry them on the portage or use another method.

I haven't broken any rods carrying them over portages, but i've had enough close calls to make me not want to try my luck much more.
 
espezial
member (7)member
 
06/19/2022 10:20PM  
Thanks for the idea. I might try something like that.

Wondering if you (or anyone) has ideas on boat control. Small drift sock? Or anchor bag (fill with rocks) or is there something else I’m missing? I don’t want to haul an anchor with me. Thanks.
 
jwettelrin89
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/19/2022 10:35PM  
You have a few options for boat control. Several more than i'm about to list. The windsock could be good, i've never used one, but i've heard others have had success with them.

You can also bring in a durable mesh bag that you can fill up with smaller rocks, tie a rope to it and use that as an anchor - but the mesh bag will probably hold a lot of water, so if you're moving around a lot you might bring a decent amount of water into the canoe.

We usually stay in one spot for a few days, so what I like to do is find a nice rock on the first day - one where there is a natural skinny part in the middle of the rock and the right size - about 15 lbs. Think like a stereotypical dog bone as the shape you're looking for where there is a skinny part in the middle and then it's slightly thicker in both directions as you move towards the outside of the rock. They won't all look pretty or exactly as I described but that's the concept.

Sometimes it's just a couple small chips located in the right part of the rock and you're in business. From there I take paracord and wrap it around the rock as tight as I can about 3-5 times and tie the cord off as snug as possible to ensure the paracord will not come off the rock. The reason you wrap several times with the paracord is that when you end up tying your knot, you will lose tension - the more times you wrap the rock before you tie the knot the less tension you will lose.

From there, I take a thicker rope that I will use to attach to the boat. I wouldn't recommend paracord for this rope, it's too thin and will hurt your hands as you lift and lower the anchor. For this rope get a good thicker lightweight rope. Take that rope and force it between the paracord and the rock. This will make your paracord connection even more secure to the rock as now you're stretching the paracord to get the bigger rope in.

From there just tie the big rope to the paracord and you have an anchor rock. It might take you 10-20 minutes to find a good anchor rock, but once you find a good one you'll be fishing in 10 minutes with a great anchor that doesn't bring a lot of water into the bottom of the canoe every time you pull it up.

 
espezial
member (7)member
 
06/19/2022 10:58PM  
Holy cow that is amazing. Definitely going to try this out! Thanks for the tip!
 
06/20/2022 05:11AM  
jwettelrin89: "find a nice rock ...one where there is a natural skinny part in the middle of the rock and the right size - about 15 lbs (and shaped like a dog bone). "
That should fill up most of the time on your trip, I'd think.
 
06/20/2022 08:08AM  
Skip the rod case (extra weight) and strap your rods under the seats and thwarts for easy portaging.

And remember... Loomis and Fenwick break just as easy as a $40 rod from Fleet Farm. Leave expensive gear at home, IMO.
 
Heyfritty
distinguished member (146)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/20/2022 09:09AM  
I bring 3 rods for different presentations and I just attach them without reels to my front thwart with bungee dealy bob’s(they act like a removable zip tie-everyone here loves them). This keeps them snug enough while portaging so they don’t rattle-which is a pet peeve of mine. My canoe happens to be the right length so that the tips are under the front grab bar and tucked into the space protected by my “nose cone”?

I think that might only work with a Kevlar canoe and maybe only some models, but I love it because I can bring one-piece rods and I feel like it’s as good as a rod case. You do have to be careful when you load/unload the front of the canoe, but the rest of the rods other than the tips are more forgiving. Just be sure that only serious fishermen load your canoe ;). I’ve even transported them with the reels on, but it is a little more of a hassle loading/unloading the canoe. I don’t fish on the way in, so they don’t come out until I’m in camp. Hope this helps.

Fritty
 
jeffw89
member (13)member
 
06/20/2022 09:21AM  
bobbernumber3: "jwettelrin89: "find a nice rock ...one where there is a natural skinny part in the middle of the rock and the right size - about 15 lbs. (and shaped like a dog bone)"
That should fill up most of the time on your trip, I'd think."

The boundary waters is a huge pile of rocks. It's never taken me more than 20 minutes to find 2 rocks for 2 canoes. Just scan the shoreline for rocks that are approximately the size you want and start searching in that area.

I've never actually found one that looks exactly like a dog bone, but you will find some goofy looking rocks that have a chip or slight dip in the center that work just fine. Once you do it's waaaay nicer than the mesh bag approach.

If you're concerned about timing maybe practice outside the bwca?
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/20/2022 09:22AM  
jwettelrin89, as an alternative, you can skip the wrapping of your anchor rock with paracord and simply use a basketball net. A $3.00 basketball net will last you several years and you don't have to worry about tying a rope around the rock and possibly having it slip out of the rope. We used to do it like you do until we discovered the basketball net method years ago. And the basketball net doesn't bring a bunch of water into the boat every time you haul it in.

And as far as carrying fishing rods in your canoe, you might consider skipping the Gorilla tape (or duct tape in general) and use Bungee Dealee Bobs. They're reusable, simple to use and hold fishing rods and other such items securely. Buy yourself a couple bags of four and you'll probably wonder why you didn't buy them sooner.
 
06/20/2022 09:28AM  
jeffw89: "bobbernumber3: "jwettelrin89: "find a nice rock ...one where there is a natural skinny part in the middle of the rock and the right size - about 15 lbs. (and shaped like a dog bone) "
That should fill up most of the time on your trip, I'd think."

The boundary waters is a huge pile of rocks. It's never taken me more than 20 minutes to find 2 rocks for 2 canoes. Just scan the shoreline for rocks that are approximately the size you want and start searching in that area.

I've never actually found one that looks exactly like a dog bone, but you will find some goofy looking rocks that have a chip or slight dip in the center that work just fine. Once you do it's waaaay nicer than the mesh bag approach.

If you're concerned about timing maybe practice outside the BWCA? "

I like the idea of less water and sludge in the boat with a single rock anchor vs. a mesh bag!
 
briar
member (25)member
 
06/20/2022 10:52AM  
We bring two piece fishing rods and carry them in a poster tube like a this. We have a small plastic container that holds our reels to protect them when they are in a pack.

US Art Supply Large Black Telescoping Drafting Tube: Diameter: 4-7/8 inch OD, 4-1/2" ID, Length: 30-1/4 to 47-3/4 inches

We don't fish when we are traveling and the weight of a poster tube is about 1 1/2 pounds which isn't much. We feel it protects our fishing rods better then secured in the canoe or carried without a case when portaging. We also use a basketball net for our anchor bag and have been doing it that way for the last 25 years. If it works no need to change.
 
technically_rugged
distinguished member (395)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/20/2022 10:57AM  
We always bring 1 piece rods, protected by rod rocks and bundled together with gear ties. I leave the reels on (protected by neoprene reel covers) but I'd be lying if I said it wouldn't be easier if we took the reels off. The main problem I have with that is safe storage of the reels - they cannot be crammed into a portage pack. It works with the reels on, you just need to tightly bundle the rods to make them easy to carry. I've carried 6 rods bundled together in this way with little issue.

As for an anchor bag, I found a big dry bag with floating rope on Amazon meant for anchoring jet skis and whatnot, and just replaced the rope with some Amsteel. Fill that sucker with a couple 5 pound rocks and you're good to go. A drift sock is probably on the purchase list for me though...
 
jeffw89
member (13)member
 
06/20/2022 11:46AM  
Jackfish: "jwettelrin89, as an alternative, you can skip the wrapping of your anchor rock with paracord and simply use a basketball net. A $3.00 basketball net will last you several years and you don't have to worry about tying a rope around the rock and possibly having it slip out of the rope. We used to do it like you do until we discovered the basketball net method years ago. And the basketball net doesn't bring a bunch of water into the boat every time you haul it in.


And as far as carrying fishing rods in your canoe, you might consider skipping the Gorilla tape (or duct tape in general) and use Bungee Dealee Bobs. They're reusable, simple to use and hold fishing rods and other such items securely. Buy yourself a couple bags of four and you'll probably wonder why you didn't buy them sooner. "


I like the basketball net idea better than the mesh bag I used. I'm still probably going to stick with the rock method b/c it only takes me 10-20 minutes to setup and we don't portage for 3-5 days. We fish pretty hard and often times we'll anchor and unanchor 10 times in a single outing as we explore multiple pieces of structure, so by the end of it there can be quite a bit of water building up on the bottom of the canoe.

Just ordered some Bungee Dealee Bobs! Those look nice. Will probably still need a piece or two of tape to secure the rods to the gunwhale where they're safest, but won't need tape on the thwarts/yolk anymore. Thanks for the tip!

 
BWfishingfanatic12
distinguished member (283)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/20/2022 02:39PM  
jwettelrin89: "I like to take the reels off and store those in the packs and then we secure the fishing rods underneeth the thwart/yolk right along the gunwales with a little bit of gorilla tape. Works pretty good for us, haven't broken one yet and we don't even notice them on the portage. I suppose it is a little risky putting all our eggs in one basket with all the rods stacked up like that.

We also basecamp, and only fish once we finish all of our portages so if you're portaging a little bit every day and using the rods between portages its probably easier to just carry them on the portage or use another method.

I haven't broken any rods carrying them over portages, but i've had enough close calls to make me not want to try my luck much more."


This is what I started doing the last couple of trips. It works well to just have your reels spooled up in your bag or equipment pack and easily can have 4 or 5 rods bungee delee bobbed to the thwarts next to the gunwales. You need to be a little careful loading and unloading but its not a problem at al.

We did just carry our rods for the first 12-15 trips I took and never broke a rod so I would not be opposed to that if I had lots of fishing to do along the way. You just need to be careful and you won't break them. We started doing the new method to free up hands, for efficiency, and travel speed.
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
06/20/2022 03:40PM  
Hey Jeffw89... looks like you're posting under two different monikers. Which one do you want?
 
jwettelrin89
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/20/2022 04:40PM  
Jackfish: "Hey Jeffw89... looks like you're posting under two different monikers. Which one do you want?"

Wow. I didn't even notice. Haha. I thought I forgot my password to the old account, so I started a new one. Whoops. Apparently I'm logged into one account on my work computer and the other on my personal.
I'll keep this one.
 
RunningFox
distinguished member (176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/20/2022 06:35PM  
I recommend a Shakespeare Ugly Stick Lite (cork handle) in 6 foot lenghth, with 2 pieces and a medium action.

And I recommend using a rod case for travel. Ss for reels, we have had really good luck with Plueger reels (president model).

Personally, I like Fireline or 8 lb. Trilene XL.

IMO, a longer rod adds difficulty when in a 17ft tandem canoe and you’re fishing off the right side of the hull (assuming right handed fishermen).

 
06/20/2022 06:48PM  
When moving I put my rods in a rod holder made out of sewer pipe, it's a lot lighter than pvc pipe. I've found that I've very seldom broke rods with other methods of carrying them but when they break they're pretty worthless and it's a long way to get a new one, so I don't want to take the chance!
 
espezial
member (7)member
 
06/20/2022 07:06PM  
Thanks everyone for the tips. Bought stuff to make a basketball net anchor and will probably jig/bobber with leeches. Still unsure about what rods to bring. we are renting canoes so I don’t know how to make are I can use the BDB to strap rods down. Will probably bring a case with 2-4 rods in pieces and just assemble when we are in camp. Thanks!
 
jwettelrin89
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
06/20/2022 08:25PM  
Sounds like a solid plan! Good luck!
 
Hammertime
distinguished member (158)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/20/2022 09:40PM  
The idea of lashing rods to the side of the canoe always terrified me. A tired person lobbing a 60 pound pack into a canoe after a portage seems like a recipe for disaster with my crew. On the other hand others swear by it so it obviously works if you’re careful.

I bought a 7 foot section of lightweight plastic pipe and end caps that carries 8 rods (no reels) and duct taped a rope handle to it. Doubles as a tarp pole in camp. If that is too much for you we also bungee rods together and stow the bundle behind the rear seat during travel.

In all my years we’ve never broken a rod. I would recommend bringing the best you have unless you absolutely can’t afford to break/lose it.

Good luck!
 
CFarrow
 
06/21/2022 04:28PM  
I ended up buying a couple of whuppin sticks from Cabelas but we haven't used them yet. We're going up in July to test them. I've heard from others that they work well, especially for the price. They also break down into 2 pieces for carrying.

Bass Pro Shops Whuppin' Stick
 
06/22/2022 08:42AM  
I take Ugly Stik Elites. Like their carbon models as well. I leave my rigs loose and they are the only items I carry by hand over the portages (butt first). This way I can fish at a moments notice while traveling.
 
foxfireniner
distinguished member (154)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/22/2022 10:17AM  
I like 6'6" one piece rods. I like Berkley Lightning rods in med light for walleye with 8' line and Diawa Revros reels. And Med heavy with 12' line for larger northern lures.

I have broken, lost, or otherwise suffered excessive futzing around with 2 piece rods that I see no advantage to them other than they will fit in a car. But, more rod tips get broken at the car than on the water and the little end always seems to find danger in transport.

None of my gear is expensive so if I break it, my heart doesn't.
 
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