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LMS11327
member (22)member
  
01/12/2024 07:20PM  
I’ll be taking my first Bdub trip in 15 years this summer. Back in the day if you camped in a hammock you were really odd. Now…the other day, in a thread here, someone claimed that most people camp in hammocks now.
Really?? “Most people?”
That’s a sweeping statement and likely hard to back up, but clearly they’ve become popular. But when did this become a thing? And why?
Please enlighten me as to the pros and cons of hammock camping.
I’m just really curious.
Cheers, all!
 
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YetiJedi
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01/12/2024 09:34PM  
I do both and enjoy both. When did hammocks become so popular? I'm not sure but their usage has increased over the last decade or so.

Here's two threads with PLENTY on the topic:

Hammocks versus tents

Another hammock or tents thread
 
ockycamper
distinguished member(1455)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/13/2024 09:40AM  
LMS11327: "I’ll be taking my first Bdub trip in 15 years this summer. Back in the day if you camped in a hammock you were really odd. Now…the other day, in a thread here, someone claimed that most people camp in hammocks now.
Really?? “Most people?”
That’s a sweeping statement and likely hard to back up, but clearly they’ve become popular. But when did this become a thing? And why?
Please enlighten me as to the pros and cons of hammock camping.
I’m just really curious.
Cheers, all!"



We bring 15-20 men up in the fall (we split into 3 groups). We have done this for 15 years. We all started in tents. Now, all are in hammocks but two guys (they like cots).

Probably due to us getting older, 50-70 year olds. The reason for hammocks:

We can set them fully up including hammock, rain fly, and underquilt in less then 5 minutes

In putting them up and taking them down they never touch the ground (we use snake skins and in line bags). . .so there is never any dirt to clean off

You can put them easily up in the rain. . . .put up the rain fly first, then get under the rain fly and put up the hammock. The hammock stays dry even in the rain

Warmer (suprisingly). We all use down underquilts rated at either 0 or 20 degrees, then use a 20 degree top quilt or sleeping bag as a blanket. . . doesn't get more toasty then that.

Can sleep in any position. . .we have spreader bar hammocks as well as asym hammocks. Allows you to sleep even on your stomach

Best of all. . .for those 3 trips out at night. . . we are no longer crawling out on our knees. Simply unzip the hammock and swing your legs out like sitting in a chair. Boots are kept beneath the hammock. Just slip them on and you are on your way. For dressing. . . we use larger rain flys. We keep our packs with clothes under the rain fly. Use the hammock as a chair and get dressed in the morning.

And the hammock, rain fly, and underquilt all compress down far smaller then any tent as there are no poles.

Don't know about others but if our groups are a test, 80% are in hammocks.
 
01/13/2024 09:58AM  
I doubt if "most" people hammock camp, but it has certainly increased substantially in recent years. I still use a tent and see a lot of tents.
 
ockycamper
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01/13/2024 10:08AM  
It seems to trend by age groups and type. Families are still in tents as are the younger guys. Men, particularly when they get a little older have moved to hammocks in my experience. Warmer, more comfortable, easier to set up, easier to carry.
 
01/13/2024 03:16PM  






For me it's just an age and body issue. Way easier to get out in the middle of the night from the hammock than it is to crawl out from a tent.

I think the hammock trend started about 10 to 15 years ago. I've been in a hammock for probably about 10 years.

The fact is I'm just more comfortable at night in a hammock than I am laying on the ground and I'm sure that's the same reason that a lot of others have gone to hammocks.

Other pluses as you don't have to have a flat site to set up your hammock on. You just have to have a suitable trees so many feet apart.

Tony
 
ockycamper
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01/13/2024 03:22PM  
I have that same hammock. . .Warbonet Ridgeruner. Most comfortable hammock I have ever used. And I can set it up in less then 5 minutes including the rain fly and underquilt
 
ockycamper
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01/13/2024 03:23PM  
I also have string lights. ARe the ones in the photo to light the other guys sites, or path to the privy?
 
01/13/2024 03:55PM  
ockycamper: "I also have string lights. ARe the ones in the photo to light the other guys sites, or path to the privy?"


Those were too light the path to the privy I had a family group with me at eight people. So we had about 10 Lucy lights and three strings of lights that we had the whole site lit up.

Tony
 
01/13/2024 10:16PM  
There is absolutely no way that "most people" hammock. I'd guess less than 20% hammock just from my observations passing near campsites. Even that may be a stretch. One thing is true though, we are definitely an odd bunch and proud of it.

I would add just one thing. If this is your first BWCA trip then I'd suggest that it isn't your first hammock experience also. Be comfortable with a night in a hammock before you take lt into the wilderness for the first time. There is a learning curve for the BWCAW and also a learning curve for hammocks. I wouldn't want to juggle both learning curves on my first trip with both. Maybe a tent the first BWCAW trip and then work into hammocks in the wilderness onna later trip.
 
Cvendel
member (21)member
  
01/16/2024 03:37PM  
I am a late convert to "hammocking" a buddy brought one last year, I was skeptical, but he let me use it one night! Wow! I am all in!! Can someone please give me some good options for hammock set ups for a new user??
Thanks,
Chris
 
01/16/2024 04:24PM  
Cvendel: "I am a late convert to "hammocking" a buddy brought one last year, I was skeptical, but he let me use it one night! Wow! I am all in!! Can someone please give me some good options for hammock set ups for a new user??
Thanks,
Chris "


I got in late too, still love to tent but also loving the hang time. There are a ton of opinions on setups but rather than give you mine, do yourself a fun favor and find Shug's channel on Youtube. He has used/reviewed most of what's available from the cottage industry and you'll learn a ton about hammocks, quilts, tarps, suspensions. He is quite the Shug!

Do put too much pressure on yourself to make perfect choices when putting together your first kit. Most hammocker's setups seem to evolve over time as they spend time getting to know their gear out on the trail. Have fun learning the new language!


 
ockycamper
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01/16/2024 04:35PM  
Find an inexpensive hammock to start with. There are a ton of them on Ebay and Craigslist. Pick up a Henessy or something like it and try it out.

The biggest complaint most new hamock hangers have is that they got cold. Its kind of like shooting rifles. Buy a cheaper rifle and put the money in the scope. Same with hammocks. Go for a less expensive hammock and spend your money on a good down underquilt that can be transferred to new hammocks as you trade up.

Once you climb into a hammock with a 20 degree or 0 down underquilt on a cold night you will understand why those of us that hammock camp do it.
 
LMS11327
member (22)member
  
01/16/2024 04:42PM  
ockycamper: "Find an inexpensive hammock to start with. There are a ton of them on Ebay and Craigslist. Pick up a Henessy or something like it and try it out.

The biggest complaint most new hamock hangers have is that they got cold. Its kind of like shooting rifles. Buy a cheaper rifle and put the money in the scope. Same with hammocks. Go for a less expensive hammock and spend your money on a good down underquilt that can be transferred to new hammocks as you trade up.

Once you climb into a hammock with a 20 degree or 0 down underquilt on a cold night you will understand why those of us that hammock camp do it."


Well, your rifle analogy is apt, because I was a nationally ranked Olympic-style rifle shooter for a very long time, and just missed making the US Olympic Team in 2016. (So I don’t believe in cheap rifles, only super accurate ones. ??

I will look into used hammocks. Thanks!
 
moosedoggie
distinguished member (197)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/16/2024 05:01PM  
LMS11327: "
ockycamper: "Find an inexpensive hammock to start with. There are a ton of them on Ebay and Craigslist. Pick up a Henessy or something like it and try it out.


The biggest complaint most new hamock hangers have is that they got cold. Its kind of like shooting rifles. Buy a cheaper rifle and put the money in the scope. Same with hammocks. Go for a less expensive hammock and spend your money on a good down underquilt that can be transferred to new hammocks as you trade up.


Once you climb into a hammock with a 20 degree or 0 down underquilt on a cold night you will understand why those of us that hammock camp do it."



Well, your rifle analogy is apt, because I was a nationally ranked Olympic-style rifle shooter for a very long time, and just missed making the US Olympic Team in 2016. (So I don’t believe in cheap rifles, only super accurate ones. ??

I will look into used hammocks. Thanks! "


You should also look into the Hammock Group Forum on this site. There's an incredible amount of information there.
 
ockycamper
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01/16/2024 05:29PM  
Here is an idea of what I mean. It is a Hennessy Explorer Deluxe size zip. Has the hammock, netting, rainfly, tree straps. . . everything you need but some bottom insulation. You can even put a camping pad in the hammock for the time being.

When buying your hammock, remember you need more then just the hammock. It will need mosquito netting, a rain fly, some way to hang it. I have had Hennessy hammocks, Warbonnet Ridge Runners (a spreader bar/flat lay hammock), Chrysallis/Helson hammocks and several cheap Grand Trunk type. Stay away form the Walmart (think Grand Trunk) hammocks. I bring them just for naps but that's it.

For myself, I would not buy any hammock other then a WarBonnett or a Hennessy. Hennessy Hammock on Ebay
 
ockycamper
distinguished member(1455)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/16/2024 05:35PM  
LMS11327: "
ockycamper: "Find an inexpensive hammock to start with. There are a ton of them on Ebay and Craigslist. Pick up a Henessy or something like it and try it out.


The biggest complaint most new hamock hangers have is that they got cold. Its kind of like shooting rifles. Buy a cheaper rifle and put the money in the scope. Same with hammocks. Go for a less expensive hammock and spend your money on a good down underquilt that can be transferred to new hammocks as you trade up.


Once you climb into a hammock with a 20 degree or 0 down underquilt on a cold night you will understand why those of us that hammock camp do it."



Well, your rifle analogy is apt, because I was a nationally ranked Olympic-style rifle shooter for a very long time, and just missed making the US Olympic Team in 2016. (So I don’t believe in cheap rifles, only super accurate ones. ??

I will look into used hammocks. Thanks! "


I totally agree. Just making the point that many people buy a very expensive rifle and throw a cheap scope on it. Hammocks are like that. Most hammocks will "feel" the same. Its staying warm/dry/bug free that makes the difference. The two underquilt companies I buy from are Hammock Gear (the incuibator hammocks), and Arrowhead Equipment
 
Bamthor
senior member (60)senior membersenior member
  
01/17/2024 08:34AM  
I'd recommend buying a Superior Gear hammock they are made in MN they have a built in underquilt and a nice strapping system for a beginner it is easy to use and understand. They sell a bundle that covers everything you need. Shug loves them and he is the hammock guru. I have one for winter camping rated to -40 and a 30 degree one I use for the rest of the year. If you buy the winter tarp it can double as a rain shelter in the summer and fall season and it will save you even more weight.
I also have a Hennessy and a Dream Hammock and they are both great as well.
If you are taller get a longer setup so you don't get shoulder squeeze at night. The most important thing is to set it up at home a few times and sleep in it a few times before you go to the BWCA so if you need to set it up in the rain quickly you won't be fumbling around.
 
ockycamper
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01/17/2024 09:08AM  
Superior Gear makes a great hammock, but it is also without question the most expensive setup on the market. At $540 plus tax and shipping. And that is for a 30 degree underquilt. You can pick up a Hennessy for $150 that has everything but the underquilt. A 20 degree down quilt from Hammock gear will run you $240, but you can get 10% off as a new customer. You would have a complete system for $370 that has a 20 degree underquilt vs 30 or 40 degree. The other big drawback on the Superior Gear is that the underquilt is attached to the hammock. You can't use it on any other hammock.

Buy your underquilt once, and use it on any and all hammocks (unless you go to a bridge style and even then you can make them work). You would have a quality underquilt for life.

Then start with an inexpensive used hammock, or borrow some hammocks and try them out until you decide what you want.
 
scottiebaldwin
distinguished member (222)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/17/2024 10:15AM  
Submitting my vote for Kammok Mantis Ultralight. $269 before the REI discount. They make great underquilts as well that snap underneath that doubles as a poncho. Also love the tiny hammock that can go underneath for gear or a pup!

 
Bamthor
senior member (60)senior membersenior member
  
01/17/2024 10:44AM  
Hi Ocky
You are quoting the lighter elite 11' model if you scroll down you can see that a standard 10' superior setup is 389 and there is a 5% discount so it is $369.55 for the same thing or ten bucks more for an 11' model. I like Superior because you don't get drafts between the UQ and the hammock when winter camping. I'm a big guy and tend to move a lot so I have a tendency to push the underquilt down while sleeping. Then I wake up with cold shoulders. You also save some weight running with an integrated UQ because you are eliminating a layer of fabric. I like that the snaps are in place for the top quilt as well or if it is warm you can snap them together and eliminate a top quilt entirely. This is nice in the summer and helps you save more weight. I like that I can have holes patched by driving a few miles as well if needed since I live in the TC. I agree though that your options are great as well and I would be completely happy with the setup you proposed. I was just trying to give the OP another option. As far as quality goes in my experience owning five brands Dream Hammock is the best product but he can have a long wait time. I will say I miss five or six years ago because all of these setups were a lot cheaper then. Down must be worth more than gold.
To the Op
I would just call a few places and talk to the owners. You cannot really go wrong with any of them. It is like buying a fishing pole or shotgun they all work but some just "feel" right for you.
 
OCDave
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01/18/2024 09:56AM  
LMS11327: "...

... But when did this become a thing? And why?
Please enlighten me as to the pros and cons of hammock camping.
I’m just really curious.
Cheers, all!"


I bought my first hammock camping set-up, an ENO OneLink, back in 2011. It included the hammock, suspension, tarp and bugnet. It was too heavy, too short and did not include insulation but it got me off the ground and made sleeping outdoors feel much more "outdoors". I typically hang my tarp to see the stars and my surroundings, weather permitting.

A full hammock camping set-up can be quite expensive. When determining where to invest, you'll get your best return on investment buying a decent down underquilt. I have HammockGear Incubator underquilts, both 20* and 40* weights. For the BWCA, I suggest the 20* for all but the hottest weeks of the summer. I started with an inflatable pad inside the hammock for insulation but changing to the underquilt was the single best upgrade of my experience. I use the 40* underquilt when backpacking or on July and August canoe trips.

Simple gathered-end hammocks are least expensive. Hammocks with integrated bugnets are most convenient. If starting today, I'd get the Blackbird XLC from Warbonnet Outdoors . The Blackbird is famous for it's foot box design. It allows a flatter lie by providing a bit of relief for your legs. The XLC is extra long and convertible (you can remove the integrated bugnet for shoulder season camping). I own the original Blackbird, shorter, non-convertible version. I use a gathered-end when bugs are not a concern.

I use the Warbonnet Superfly as my "go to" tarp but, start-up costs can be cut by using a standard blue construction tarp until you know hammock camping is for you.

While the cons are mostly associated with the dollars involved, the pros are seemingly infinite. Much like a fisherman's tacklebox, the permutations of equipment and style are infinite. I confess that over the past decade I have purchased a dozen hammocks, 5 different tarps, 6 different quilts and I have made countless different suspensions. I can be a bit OCD so, pursuit of the perfect hang is a persistent motivator.

Good Luck and happy hangin'
 
iCallitMaize
distinguished member (206)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
02/01/2024 03:48AM  
It’s a rabbit hole for sure. I got totally sucked into the different suspension systems. Good intelligent folks on here….love the analogies. I have also been down the rifle mod slippery slope…better glass…better trigger…better stock…different brake…and I won’t even touch the reloading bottomless pit.

Probably don’t have much to add but I do think some mentioned utilizing both at different times. Being a shooter, you will understand that not all platforms are best for all situations. I have both and use both and have sometimes wished I had the other option with me.

My hang:
Hennessey Old Bottom Entry
Double Ended Stuff Sack
Continuous Loops/Beckett Hitch/Straps
Hammock Gear Tarp w/doors
Jacks R Better 3/4 UQ


Just YouTube ole Shug. All the info you will need and some laughs to go along with it.

Much like a fisherman's tacklebox, the permutations of equipment and style are infinite. I confess that over the past decade I have purchased a dozen hammocks, 5 different tarps, 6 different quilts and I have made countless different suspensions. I can be a bit OCD so, pursuit of the perfect hang is a persistent motivator.


Good Luck and happy hangin'"
 
05/10/2024 01:26PM  
Late to this thread, but two things; 1) Hammocks are super versatile when it comes to location comfort and 2) reach out to the Unshaven Man. That guy has no idea how much he's helped me on this very topic.
I sure hope he doesn't get upset with me offering him as a go to, but the guy is a WEALTH of information on this issue.
 
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