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12/06/2012 12:46PM  
Anyone here ever try eating porcupine? How was it? How did you cook it? Fill me in with all the details.
Thanks
 
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mr.barley
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12/06/2012 01:46PM  
I want to be the first one to say it tastes like chicken!
 
Dennisal
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12/06/2012 02:01PM  
Has its own toothpicks. Seriously, I would think it would taste a lot like groundhog.
 
12/06/2012 03:21PM  
Are you THAT hungry ?
 
12/06/2012 03:25PM  
Does groundhog taste like woodchuck?
 
12/06/2012 03:52PM  
No, we don't have porcupines down here, but we do have raccoons. I've eaten coon that was terrible and coon that wasn't too bad.
 
JJ396
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12/06/2012 06:25PM  
My dog tried it but didn't like it. :-(
 
12/06/2012 06:29PM  
taste like beaver ;>)
 
neutroner
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12/06/2012 08:04PM  
It tasted kind of piney. It was not too tough, but I could really taste the wood. all in all not a bad tasting animal.
Recipe:
Kind of a standard stew;
3 celery stalks
3 carrots
5 potatoes
1 Med onion
1 pkg mushrooms
1 can mushroom soup
5 cups water
dash caraway seed, dill, lemon pepper
garlic and salt to taste
soak overnight in apple cider vinegar and water with 2 tbls salt, rinse cook slowly 6-7 hours.

 
12/06/2012 09:52PM  
Seriously?
I should have tried it last weekend then.
I have a cookbook I got from my grandmother that I should have looked at. This book is about 70 - 80 years old and contains all kinds of recipes for every animal in the woods. Of course this was from the days when people ate anything to survive. I'll have to dig that book out.
 
Dennisal
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12/07/2012 03:22PM  
In my area we call them groundhogs, but woodchucks are probably the same animal.
Have eaten young hogs and taste a lot like squirrel.
 
12/07/2012 09:57PM  
I've never eaten one myself, but I was taught as a young hunter never to harvest them because if you ever get lost in the woods they are one of the few animals that are really quite easy to kill if you're starving. Supposedly they are quite easy to skin, you just get them on their back since their are no spines on their underside.
 
12/08/2012 07:03AM  
Kinda prickly!
 
12/19/2012 06:59PM  
quote keth0601: "I've never eaten one myself, but I was taught as a young hunter never to harvest them because if you ever get lost in the woods they are one of the few animals that are really quite easy to kill if you're starving. Supposedly they are quite easy to skin, you just get them on their back since their are no spines on their underside."
1
 
12/26/2012 05:22PM  
Fitgers - Here's a tasty recipe for you :
Carefully skin the porcupine, wash out and pat dry. Soak the whole animal in buttermilk overnight.Prepare a bag of stuffing as per the directions and add diced apples , onions and whole raisins to the mixture. Completely stuff the whole cavity. Season with salt and pepper. Lay strips of bacon over the whole animal. Place on a Weber grill using the indirect heat method. Cover with foil. Cook 3-4 hours on medium heat. Remove from grill. Then throw whole thing in the garbage and go out for pizza. Hope this helps.
 
12/30/2012 11:14PM  
quote izzy: "Fitgers - Here's a tasty recipe for you :
Carefully skin the porcupine, wash out and pat dry. Soak the whole animal in buttermilk overnight.Prepare a bag of stuffing as per the directions and add diced apples , onions and whole raisins to the mixture. Completely stuff the whole cavity. Season with salt and pepper. Lay strips of bacon over the whole animal. Place on a Weber grill using the indirect heat method. Cover with foil. Cook 3-4 hours on medium heat. Remove from grill. Then throw whole thing in the garbage and go out for pizza. Hope this helps."


Ha ha ha. Good one.
 
01/02/2013 10:48AM  
Fitgers - Glad you liked it !
 
jldavis
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01/03/2013 10:14PM  
My Uncle and I traded a couple of grouse to some guys on a river rendezvoused for a skun porky and fried in butter with salt and pepper. We thought it was pretty good.
 
jeroldharter
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01/04/2013 07:18AM  
Tastes like eagle.
 
Bwoods
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01/04/2013 09:57AM  
I own an African Crested Procupine that I use as an educational animal. She is about 25 lbs now and will get up to 40 lbs. They are the worlds 2nd largest rodent. We joke around the house about which animals would get eaten first if the zombies came, Roxie the porcupine would be on our plates as soon as we run out of chickens. Maybe I need to bookmark this page for future reference.
 
02/13/2013 09:46PM  
That was always a survival food, frontiermen could shoot or capture very easy.
 
02/14/2013 02:57PM  
quote Dennisal: "In my area we call them groundhogs, but woodchucks are probably the same animal.
Have eaten young hogs and taste a lot like squirrel."


Stump Pigs. Ate young groundhog once. With potatoes,carrots, celery, onions...like a pot roast. It was at my cousin's moms. (They had 11 children) and she was a good cook!
 
04/07/2013 10:31AM  
Made stewed raccoon once and it was excellent! You have to make sure you get the scent glands out or you won't like it. Don't know if porcupines have scent glands.
Porc=pig, & pine= prickly.
I'm sure it takes like pork.
 
04/07/2013 02:44PM  
quote Captn Tony: "Made stewed raccoon once and it was excellent! You have to make sure you get the scent glands out or you won't like it. Don't know if porcupines have scent glands.
Porc=pig, & pine= prickly.
I'm sure it takes like pork."


I also made raccoon and I loved it. But if I eat it once every 5 years that will be enough.
 
Hub
Guest Paddler
  
04/11/2013 03:56PM  
Have you ever seen a hollowed out stump a Raccoon lives in? It's absolutely covered in turds and so are they. I might eat a porkie in a pinch if I was stuck out in the woods, but not on purpose. Like Jules Winfield says, 'I ain't eating nothing that don't have sense enough to disregard it's own feces'.
 
Hub
Guest Paddler
  
04/11/2013 04:00PM  
I meant porcupine not raccoon in my above post. Raccoons are actually pretty cleanly. They wash their own food for heavens sake. They don't taste bad either.
 
04/11/2013 04:28PM  
Porcupine was considered survival food for many pioneers when times were lean.
 
h20
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04/11/2013 06:24PM  
quote Hub: "Have you ever seen a hollowed out stump a Raccoon lives in? It's absolutely covered in turds and so are they. I might eat a porkie in a pinch if I was stuck out in the woods, but not on purpose. Like Jules Winfield says, 'I ain't eating nothing that don't have sense enough to disregard it's own feces'. "
Have you ever seen how cows and pigs live? Talk about mega turds.
 
Spartan1
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04/11/2013 07:39PM  
quote h20: "
quote Hub: "Have you ever seen a hollowed out stump a Raccoon lives in? It's absolutely covered in turds and so are they. I might eat a porkie in a pinch if I was stuck out in the woods, but not on purpose. Like Jules Winfield says, 'I ain't eating nothing that don't have sense enough to disregard it's own feces'. "
Have you ever seen how cows and pigs live? Talk about mega turds."


If given the opportunity, pigs will use one area to deposit their turds and another one to sleep. They do like mud to keep cool. From experience.
 
Hub
Guest Paddler
  
04/12/2013 12:59PM  
quote h20: "
quote Hub: "Have you ever seen a hollowed out stump a porcupine lives in? It's absolutely covered in turds and so are they. I might eat a porkie in a pinch if I was stuck out in the woods, but not on purpose. Like Jules Winfield says, 'I ain't eating nothing that don't have sense enough to disregard it's own feces'. "
Have you ever seen how cows and pigs live? Talk about mega turds."


I spent every summer on the farm as a boy and still spend a few weeks a year staying on the farm in the Dakota's hunting. I have seen a lot of cattle and hog operations. Cattle aren't dirty by my standards. A feed lot isn't the cleanest place in the world, but they don't stay there long. I won't argue pigs, but a lot of it has to do with who the caretaker is. My Grandfather was a podiatrist and owned his own practice. Every night after work he would drive a 40 minutes from town to his barn and take care of his animals. His pigs were a heck of a lot cleaner than an animals living on top of 3 feet of it's own filth in a hollowed out tree.
 
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