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MagicPaddler
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05/04/2015 12:52PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I have had trouble with my feet on most trips and have acquired several pare of shows trying to solve the problems. Most of the shoes have a clam of being fast draining but none have drain holes in the locations to promote draining for a canoeist. Getting into a canoe it you hold your foot up to drain you will hold your tow down where there are no drain holes. While setting in a canoe your heel will be down where there are no drain holes. I noticed that my shoes are heavy on portage trail and knew that it was due to water in them. Yesterday I decided to test all my portage shoes to see how well they drained. First I weighed all the shoes to get a reference weight. Then I put all 4 pare in a large plastic tub and filled it with water and put bricks on top of the shoes to hold them under. I left them under for over 30 minutes. At the end all of the shoes still floated. They were then set on the driveway right side up and weighed at 5,10, and 15 minutes. This was the result
Label____Dry _______5 minutes____10 minutes____15 minutes___20 Hours
OBT____42.56 Oz____56.40 Oz_____55.80 Oz_____55.44 Oz____47.21 Oz
NRS____37.89 Oz____47.40 Oz_____47.00 Oz_____46.48 Oz____39.86 Oz
Chota___37.05 Oz____65.57 Oz_____59.95 Oz_____57.99 Oz____47.85 Oz
Keen____33.95 Oz____51.90 Oz_____49.70 Oz_____47.17 Oz____40.92 Oz

I have not worn the Keen on a trip yet but plan to this summer. They are getting broke in on daily walks and are more comfortable than any of the others. I have added a few (about 5) ounce of arch support to them although they started off better than any of the others.

 photo P1020295S_zpsf6tpmxjw.jpg
 
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05/04/2015 01:35PM  
Interesting, Magic-

It seems that the NRS dry the best and the Chotas the worst based on percentage of dry weight at 20 hours.

What model of Keen boot is that?
 
MagicPaddler
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05/04/2015 02:49PM  
I am not sure if I am more concerned with water content or weight. If my arch support is subtracted from the Keens they are the lightest all the time. The NRS are one of the lighter boots. They fit like a tight but stretchy glove. Going downhill your foot will slide forward and your tow will hit the end of the shoe.
The Keens held water like a cup. If I turned the shoe over water would port out. I think they were the Voyageur model. I got them at REI
 
05/04/2015 03:18PM  
Last year I wore OTB's for first time and I liked them OK, but they seemed short for the size and the sole was thin and not supportive. I ended with sore feet on longer portages, so I'm thinking a pair of Superfeet insole replacements may be the ticket. I wore a pair of the Keen closed toe sandals the year before, but too much mud, sand, pebbles got in them.
 
Moonpath
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05/04/2015 09:22PM  
I bought a pair of keen hikers last spring. I really agree they are comfortable. My only complaint is that the rubber part of the sole has worn out very fast. It is not as durable as vibram and underneath the rubber sole is a kind of spongy material and does not last. So, comfortable, but I do not think they are cost effective if they only hold up for about 10 months. I should note that I wear my shoes hard and average 4 miles per day walking or more.
 
05/04/2015 09:26PM  
quote Moonpath: "I bought a pair of keen hikers last spring. I really agree they are comfortable. My only complaint is that the rubber part of the sole has worn out very fast. It is not as durable as vibram and underneath the rubber sole is a kind of spongy material and does not last. So, comfortable, but I do not think they are cost effective if they only hold up for about 10 months. I should note that I wear my shoes hard and average 4 miles per day walking or more. "

I've noticed the soles of mine have a spot at the ball of both feet that has just worn through. It was a disappointment to see that.
 
MagicPaddler
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05/05/2015 06:51AM  
Boonie
The pair of Keens I have to openings on the sides covered with a tightly woven cloth so stones can’t get in. I put a flashlight inside the shoe and can only get a glimpse of light through the cloth. It looks like more than one layer.
Moonpath & hooky
Bad news about the sole warring through. Walking in water is hard on stitching which ends lots of shoes but I do not think it would cause increased ware on the sole. Sounds like they would last me through many Q trips. If they work out well I may save them just for tripping.
 
05/05/2015 07:59AM  
Generally, the harder the sole material the longer they'll wear, the softer the rubber, the better they will grip. For wet rock, I'd sacrifice a little wear for better grip.
 
BobDobbs
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05/05/2015 09:40AM  
in my opinion/experience, nothing dries as fast as old school milspeck jungle boots. Sadly, since my discharge I have yet to find anything commercially available that lasts more than a couple years and cost under $100.
 
loongoingdeep
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05/05/2015 02:04PM  
Try Danner Pronghorns, light weight for there class and dry quicker than any thing else I've worn. I'm not afraid for water to go above them, have found thicker socks help the next day to dry/absorb any water. Also I don't think they hold as much water as other brands.
 
Moonpath
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05/05/2015 10:38PM  
For my trip this year to the Q I bought a pair of chat knee wading socks. They are mini hip boots that go up to your knee, and you need wading shoes for them. I have a good pair of simms wading shoes so this set up should work well. Does anyone else use the Chota knee socks as waders?
 
MagicPaddler
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05/06/2015 06:39AM  
I have used knee high water proof socks and also water proof boots. It was on a colder weather trip. My feet were warm but wet from sweat. I still use them but only on local winter paddles. On the January 1 Chicago River paddle you should see the look on the faces of the cops at the take out when I got out of the canoe and walked in the water to clear the area where canoes were to land.
 
TheBrownLeader
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05/06/2015 03:26PM  
I have 2 of your pairs of shoes shown here. The OTB, and the NRS (my model is 8 yrs old or so, it was called the Storm).

I like them both, the NRS was hard to get on and off because of the Neoprene. So I switched to the OTB. both in Black, and they both dried very quickly in the sun. I prefer the NRS for portaging as it is a really sturdy boot. But all in, if I could have one or the other I'd take the OTB. I wear it with a tennis length, thin, smartwool sock to save my foot from the rocks and sticks and things that get in there. the socks and the boots dry in no time out in the sun.
 
PineKnot
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05/06/2015 05:52PM  
I've used the OTB Abyss for several years and been satisfied with their portage and quick dry performance....wasn't overly enamored with their comfort on long portages (sorta hard soles even with inserts for those longer portages) and my first pair literally came apart on a trip after about 75 nights in Quetico.

I purchased some Baffin Swamp Buggy shoes this winter and they are much more comfortable than the Abyss and appear to have similar drain/drying ability...we'll see how durable they are this summer....
 
MagicPaddler
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12/09/2015 06:00PM  
I wore the keens on 2 trips this summer totaling 29 days. The best portaging boot I have worm.
 
MagicPaddler
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03/16/2017 06:46AM  
In 2016 I wore the Keens on 3 trips totaling 30+ days. One trip included the trousers to Cache portage. The shoes are the most comfortable portage shoe I have owned. 2 of the trips would have put blisters on my feet with any of my other shoes.
THE SHOES I LIKE SO WELL ARE THE
KEEN MEN'S VOYAGEUR MID
 
Sheepdogged
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03/16/2017 08:43AM  
In my opinion the only way to go is to accept the fact that your feet are going to get wet. If you need support between lakes then wear your hiking boots or camp boots but in the canoe and at landings wear sandals and dry your feet off when you get to the next landing or camp. I wear Chaco Men's Outcross Evo 1 Sport Water Shoe and they rock. Great traction and enough holes to drain water yet keep the sticks out at muddy landings. #2cents
 
BigCurrent
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03/16/2017 09:32AM  
quote Sheepdogged: "In my opinion the only way to go is to accept the fact that your feet are going to get wet. If you need support between lakes then wear your hiking boots or camp boots but in the canoe and at landings wear sandals and dry your feet off when you get to the next landing or camp. I wear Chaco Men's Outcross Evo 1 Sport Water Shoe and they rock. Great traction and enough holes to drain water yet keep the sticks out at muddy landings. #2cents
"


+1 . I gave up trying to keep my feet dry years ago. Now I just wear Chaco sandals. If it's cold I'll throw on a pair of wool socks. I trust their grip and they are more comfortable than anything else I own.
 
jfinn
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03/16/2017 09:47AM  
Thanks for the details review MP. I love this stuff! Interesting that the OTB's didn't drain great and that users seems split on quality and comfort.

For years I used different sandals, being happy in all but cold water (cold feet). Sometimes with a neoprene sock or barefoot, I enjoyed the ability to rinse my foot after launching a canoe and the lightweight and freedom my feet felt. But with an early season April trip last year I tried Merrell Moabs (non waterproof) with the Chotta hippies. It worked so well, I switched to wool socks and the Moabs for summer trips and love it. The ability to stick my foot anywhere, especially when exiting the canoe in murky water or bolder gardens is a plus. I would give them a solid B on drain-ability. I tested fit of all the drain-able boots at Cabalas and REI and found these to be best for the hippies without insole, one size bigger than usual. The fit is OK, blister free with the insole and a quality sock. I would recommend a look at these shoes.

The one downside, is that I will get some small stones inside the shoes. This is likely an issue with all boots and their padded upper causing less than a form fit at the top. I guess that is where gaiters come into play.


John
 
jfinn
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03/16/2017 09:47AM  
Thanks for the details review MP. I love this stuff! Interesting that the OTB's didn't drain great and that users seems split on quality and comfort.

For years I used different sandals, being happy in all but cold water (cold feet). Sometimes with a neoprene sock or barefoot, I enjoyed the ability to rinse my foot after launching a canoe and the lightweight and freedom my feet felt. But with an early season April trip last year I tried Merrell Moabs (non waterproof) with the Chotta hippies. It worked so well, I switched to wool socks and the Moabs for summer trips and love it. The ability to stick my foot anywhere, especially when exiting the canoe in murky water or bolder gardens is a plus. I would give them a solid B on drain-ability. I tested fit of all the drain-able boots at Cabalas and REI and found these to be best for the hippies without insole, one size bigger than usual. The fit is OK, blister free with the insole and a quality sock. I would recommend a look at these shoes.

The one downside, is that I will get some small stones inside the shoes. This is likely an issue with all boots and their padded upper causing less than a form fit at the top. I guess that is where gaiters come into play.


John
 
Savage Voyageur
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03/16/2017 03:44PM  
MP while I like the fact that you did a somewhat scientific study here you proved only one thing. How fast they will dry in the sun on your driveway. I want to wear my boots not just look at them in the sun. How about a new study with new test procedures.

Start with your choice of a soaking wet boot and put them on just like you would be doing at a portage wet footing. Then walk around and measure the moisture levels every so often.

Here's my point, (waterproof) boots take forever to dry once wet inside. But boots with drain holes or mesh dry fast. As you walk in the wet boots the water is pumped out the holes or mesh. Depending on the breathablity of the boot some brands will dry at faster rates.



 
Guest Paddler
 
03/16/2017 05:01PM  
Converse Chuck Taylor's.

Seriously these are canoe shoes that are going to be trashed after the first trip, why complicate things.
 
03/16/2017 06:43PM  
I think I have a different perspective on this topic. As a life long stream trout fisherman with Simms and Patagonia wading boots, I fail to see the difference on "portage" boots vs. "wading" boots. Both must have good traction and ankle support. Both should dry fast and withstand continuous saturation. Why is it this forum seems limited discussion and consideration to Chota Portage Boots? Personally, I own Simms and Patagonia wading boots that I think are superior to any Chota boot made. Chota s are fine but, IMO there are other options not labeled "Portage Boots". My 0.02
 
BigCurrent
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03/16/2017 09:46PM  
quote BnD: "I think I have a different perspective on this topic. As a life long stream trout fisherman with Simms and Patagonia wading boots, I fail to see the difference on "portage" boots vs. "wading" boots. Both must have good traction and ankle support. Both should dry fast and withstand continuous saturation. Why is it this forum seems limited discussion and consideration to Chota Portage Boots? Personally, I own Simms and Patagonia wading boots that I think are superior to any Chota boot made. Chota s are fine but, IMO there are other options not labeled "Portage Boots". My 0.02"

I think the main difference is the idea of hiking a long trail vs casually wading along a river. In my experience the wading boots that I have worn are not footwear that I would want to wear for hiking over rocks, roots, up and down hills, etc. They seem to be much bulkier than an average shoe.
 
03/17/2017 03:32AM  
Again I specifically named Simms and Patagonia wading boots not hodgman etc.. The boots I named are the best in the biz, lightweight, durable and fantastic boots in or out of the water. That's why I own them. I hike miles back through rough terrain to get to some of my best fishing spots.
 
03/17/2017 09:02AM  
I have found the Keen Voyagers to be an exceptional wet foot potage boot. I have wide feet and they fit great
 
OldGuystilltripping
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03/17/2017 09:59AM  
I like BnD have been using Simms wading boots for several years and find them similar to hiking boots on the portages but with drain holes and faster drying.
 
FireGuy524
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03/17/2017 10:04AM  
I have Merrell Ventilators that I wear with lightweight smartwool socks. They work well and dry quickly. I use the mid boot style but they also come in a hiking shoe. I like the ankle support of the boot. After wetfooting portages all day I put them out to dry at camp and wear a pair of camp shoes so they are good and dry in the morning.
 
03/18/2017 02:18PM  
quote BnD: "I think I have a different perspective on this topic. As a life long stream trout fisherman with Simms and Patagonia wading boots, I fail to see the difference on "portage" boots vs. "wading" boots. Both must have good traction and ankle support. Both should dry fast and withstand continuous saturation. Why is it this forum seems limited discussion and consideration to Chota Portage Boots? Personally, I own Simms and Patagonia wading boots that I think are superior to any Chota boot made. Chota s are fine but, IMO there are other options not labeled "Portage Boots". My 0.02"



The chota was originally if not still a wading boot. We just have labeled them portage boots. Pretty much the same thing. Kinda why they don't drain as mp suggested they should.

Mp, I have the same Keene in the waterproof version. They are wore out but I love them. Maybe I should have both the waterproof and the mesh.
 
03/18/2017 05:36PM  
quote nctry: "quote BnD: "I think I have a different perspective on this topic. As a life long stream trout fisherman with Simms and Patagonia wading boots, I fail to see the difference on "portage" boots vs. "wading" boots. Both must have good traction and ankle support. Both should dry fast and withstand continuous saturation. Why is it this forum seems limited discussion and consideration to Chota Portage Boots? Personally, I own Simms and Patagonia wading boots that I think are superior to any Chota boot made. Chota s are fine but, IMO there are other options not labeled "Portage Boots". My 0.02"




The chota was originally if not still a wading boot. We just have labeled them portage boots. Pretty much the same thing. Kinda why they don't drain as mp suggested they should.


Mp, I have the same Keene in the waterproof version. They are wore out but I
love them. Maybe I should have both the waterproof and the mesh."


Exactly! It's just a marketing thing labeling them "portage boots" and I contend there are much better options than Chota. It's not even close.
 
Guest Paddler
 
06/14/2017 12:05PM  
quote PineKnot: "I've used the OTB Abyss for several years and been satisfied with their portage and quick dry performance....wasn't overly enamored with their comfort on long portages (sorta hard soles even with inserts for those longer portages) and my first pair literally came apart on a trip after about 75 nights in Quetico.


I purchased some Baffin Swamp Buggy shoes this winter and they are much more comfortable than the Abyss and appear to have similar drain/drying ability...we'll see how durable they are this summer...."
 
em8260
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06/15/2017 11:01AM  
Teva shoes, used them for years, same pair going strong 4 years know. swear by them. Your going to pay almost $100 for them though, well worth it.
 
dogwoodgirl
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01/05/2020 11:40PM  
Just broke down and ordered a pair of baffin swamp buggies....I'm intrigued by the drainage in the sole. If it works and they fit my feet, I may convert from my tevas back to a shoe/boot.
 
01/06/2020 07:58AM  
MagicPaddler: "In 2016 I wore the Keens on 3 trips totaling 30+ days. One trip included the trousers to Cache portage. The shoes are the most comfortable portage shoe I have owned. 2 of the trips would have put blisters on my feet with any of my other shoes.
THE SHOES I LIKE SO WELL ARE THE
KEEN MEN'S VOYAGEUR MID "

Yup these are my go to BW boots. I wear them almost every day
 
moustachesteve
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01/06/2020 11:18AM  
dogwoodgirl: "Just broke down and ordered a pair of baffin swamp buggies....I'm intrigued by the drainage in the sole. If it works and they fit my feet, I may convert from my tevas back to a shoe/boot."

I hadn't heard of these before but Baffin makes great boots for snow/ice. I'd be interested to hear your report after using them a few times.
 
dogwoodgirl
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01/06/2020 12:42PM  
moustachesteve: "dogwoodgirl: "Just broke down and ordered a pair of baffin swamp buggies....I'm intrigued by the drainage in the sole. If it works and they fit my feet, I may convert from my tevas back to a shoe/boot."


I hadn't heard of these before but Baffin makes great boots for snow/ice. I'd be interested to hear your report after using them a few times."


I'll let you know what I think!
 
soundguy0918
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01/07/2020 09:02AM  
FireGuy524: "I have Merrell Ventilators that I wear with lightweight smartwool socks. They work well and dry quickly. I use the mid boot style but they also come in a hiking shoe. I like the ankle support of the boot. After wetfooting portages all day I put them out to dry at camp and wear a pair of camp shoes so they are good and dry in the morning."

+1 for Merrell. I have Capra Rapid Hiking Shoes that have all of the support and comfort of a NB walking shoe but they drain instantly and "feel" dry almost as fast.
 
soundguy0918
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01/07/2020 09:02AM  
FireGuy524: "I have Merrell Ventilators that I wear with lightweight smartwool socks. They work well and dry quickly. I use the mid boot style but they also come in a hiking shoe. I like the ankle support of the boot. After wetfooting portages all day I put them out to dry at camp and wear a pair of camp shoes so they are good and dry in the morning."

+1 for Merrell. I have Capra Rapid Hiking Shoes that have all of the support and comfort of a NB walking shoe but they drain instantly and "feel" dry almost as fast.
 
01/07/2020 07:03PM  
Was not going to but discussion in another thread lead me to see and offer results,

Weight dry 27.7 ounces.
Soaked in hot tap water for 15 minutes, let drain for 5 minutes.
Weight wet 34.3 ounces.
a gain of 6.6 ounces.
After 20 hours the boot weighed 30.0 ounces, within 2.3 ounces.
In an all leather constructed custom boot, Minimalist Thula Thula
That was a single boot but the heaviest of the pair, tap hot is 115 measured fresh out of the tap. No sunshine indoors.

butthead
 
dogwoodgirl
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01/08/2020 03:06PM  
Swamp Buggies just arrived and wearing them around the house so far they are comfortable and lightweight. Could have more arch support, but real grippy and the design looks optimal for drainage.

Now if only it wasn't hardwater season!
 
dogwoodgirl
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07/21/2020 09:50AM  
Baffins just went on their first short trip- just a day trip, but in sandy, silty conditions and so far I really love them! Great drainage, and not a speck of sand got in them. Got a 5 day trip coming up next week, but so far I'm very happy with their performance.
 
MossBack
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07/22/2020 07:34AM  
Mr. Butthead, Some time ago you posted about wearing a pair of Russells for wet foot loading and unloading. I tried to find the post, but failed. Could you offer up those details again. At least which model and the waterproof info. Thanks for your help. MB
 
07/22/2020 11:58AM  
Call me crazy, which I am sure some of you will. I have plenty of experience and tried all sorts of boots, and unless I am trying to crank miles and miles out, or knowingly headed to goat paths. I find crocks the best, just careful when stepping. They dry in minutes, protect toes from smashing and add no weight. They have no ankle support and can easily be sucked into a bog. But if you are headed to well travelled and dry portages they work amazing.
 
07/22/2020 12:35PM  
MossBack: "Mr. Butthead, Some time ago you posted about wearing a pair of Russells for wet foot loading and unloading. I tried to find the post, but failed. Could you offer up those details again. At least which model and the waterproof info. Thanks for your help. MB"

Simple lower case butthead does me fine!
Minimalist Thula Thula is my most often worn pair of shoes/boots, ordered with full weatherproof leather, 1/4 heel counter 6 inch height. Read the article detailing the Munson Last, my boot size is 8 1/2 EEEE with a medium high arch.

Also have a pair (my first custom boots) of 20+ year old Mohican Stalkers now just called Trackers.

A pair of Heavy Hikers. Insulated with a 200 gram Thinsulate liner, Airbob Claw soles, and 5 inch height.
The Minimalist and Mohicans get twice a year Pecard silicone waterproofing, frequent in sink saddle soap wash inside and out, cream polish as needed. Heavy Hikers get twice a year treated with Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP Leather Preservative, frequent sadle soap wash inside and out, polished as needed. I do have a pair of Country Chukka boots in chamois leather.

The Mohicans (20+ yeas old) and Minimalist (8 or9 years old) were/are used on canoe trips (they dry almost fully overnight) and warmer weather hikes, Heavy Hiker in fall/winter. They all get wet and muddy often.

Secret to long boot life, functionality, water resistance, is in regular care as recommended by the maker. They know the leathers used and how to treat different tanning methods. Good example is weather resistant or chrome tanned that responds best to liquid silicone treatment and a cream polish, oil tanned leathers get treated with a natural oil or paste for conditioning and water resistance. Regular washing to keep sweat salts and foot oils cleaned out, polishing and brushing to finish.
2011 thread

butthead
 
MossBack
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07/22/2020 01:59PM  
butthead, This was exactly what I needed. I was going to make the trip to Russell's when I attended Copia this past Spring, but of course that did not happen. They are 900 miles round trip from where I live, so I will have to do it by mail. My normal size is 5E or 6E and that appears to be about as wide as Russell's go. Thanks again for your help. MB
 
dogwoodgirl
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08/26/2020 06:36PM  
Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars!

 
bentshaft
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08/27/2020 10:57AM  
dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars!


"


Do these provide decent ankle support?
 
dogwoodgirl
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08/27/2020 12:33PM  
bentshaft: "dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars!



"



Do these provide decent ankle support?"


They just went just above my ankles, but can be cinched tight to help with that. My knees are my weak spot, so not sure about that. They were like a low hiker or high tennis shoe.
 
DownStrm
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08/31/2020 10:41PM  
dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars!


"

Your review sold me. I just tried to order the men's version from Baffin and Amazon. Both sites showed no men's shoes available in any size.
 
MagicPaddler
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09/01/2020 06:29AM  
I am still wearing the Keen Voyageur Mid Hiking Boot. The first pair wore out and the second pare are doing well.
 
dogwoodgirl
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09/01/2020 12:50PM  
DownStrm: "dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars!

"

Your review sold me. I just tried to order the men's version from Baffin and Amazon. Both sites showed no men's shoes available in any size."

That is sad news - hope they are not discontinued.
 
EddyTurn
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
09/03/2020 02:20PM  
dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars! " Thank you for your review! I wonder why no one talks about toe protection, which in my opinion is a necessary feature for portaging shoes. Do the Buggies have any?
 
dogwoodgirl
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09/04/2020 12:52AM  
EddyTurn: "dogwoodgirl: "Baffin Swamp Buggies just got off a 2 wk trip and performed very well! Did not get sucked off my feet in knee deep sucking mud, and were not full of silt and twigs at any point. Drained beautifully....5 stars! " Thank you for your review! I wonder why no one talks about toe protection, which in my opinion is a necessary feature for portaging shoes. Do the Buggies have any?"

They are a completely closed toe low hiking/portaging shoe, so yes. Unless you mean do they have steel toes- they do not. Unfortunately Baffin got back to me and they are discontinued.
 
EddyTurn
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09/04/2020 06:33AM  
Thanks! I still see almost all sizes available at the US Amazon.
 
dogwoodgirl
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09/04/2020 01:35PM  
EddyTurn: "Thanks! I still see almost all sizes available at the US Amazon."

They were out of 14 mens, but did still have the baffin amazon in 14, so if a larger size is needed it's still out there. Baffin says they are not planning to bring them back, so when they're gone, they're gone. I got a pair for my son, hope they fit.
 
EddyTurn
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09/06/2020 06:04PM  
It all depends of course on the weight you carry and prevailing terrain, but if you travel miles of rocky trails and carry 330+lbs as I do (including my own weight) then a single layer of rubber between your toes and a rock can't be considered a protection. I'd rather go with heavy hiking boots with reinforced toes, even though they tend to soak in pounds of water, than light comfortable shoes that will leave me defenseless on the trail. My toe nails keep growing back, but nowadays it takes longer than 7-8 months intermission between a fall and next summer trips.
 
dogwoodgirl
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09/06/2020 09:54PM  
Not really a "single layer of rubber" if you're referring to the Baffins. But no, they don't have steel toes, so if that is what you're looking for, they aren't for you.
 
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