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   Group Forum: Solo Tripping
      Canoe weight?     
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Guyinaboat
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05/09/2016 10:43PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I would like to collect some information to help me get a feel for what others have done and are doing.

1. What is the heaviest canoe or kayak that you have taken to BW for a solo trip?

2. How much does your current boat weigh?

The heavier boats tend to ride better but they cost energy on a portage. I'm trying to determine my trade-off. Thanks.
 
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05/09/2016 10:56PM  
Heavy canoes and what I interpret ride quality, have little if anything to do with each other. I have used dedicated solos, Wenonah Moccasin 38 pounds, and Advantage 32 pounds. Both have handled big water/wind well, both fun and a joy to paddle.

butthead
 
Banksiana
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05/10/2016 01:15AM  
When considering loaded boats the mass of the hull has little effect on "ride". Imagine a 170# paddler with 70# of gear- A relatively heavy solo hull would bring the total mass to 285# a very light solo and the total mass would be 270#. In most cases the mass of the boat makes little difference on the water- big difference on land.

Shape of the boat is what really determines the ride.
 
FOG51
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05/10/2016 01:55AM  
Started out in a 17 foot Alu tin can, [about 75 pds] used that many miles and years, then moved up to a Mad River Traveler, fiberglass and gel coat [about 60 pounds] used that a couple of years and several trips. Currently paddeling a Savage River carbon-extreme Deep Creek Solo weighs 29 pounds. As I progress in years I get smarter. FRED
 
wetcanoedog
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05/10/2016 02:44AM  
I went from a 85 pound fiberglass canoe that I over built when I was working at a canoe shop.i added more glass because I was only going out on the St Croix river at the time.i was doing a lot of back water log jam pull overs.it even had fiberglass over plywood for seats!
just two trips to the BW with that before I moved to a Oldtown Pathfinder at 57 pounds of Royalex.i was all over the BW/Q in that for 20 or so years.on my last big Q solo it was feeling heavy so in 2006 I bought a Bell Prospector.at 37 pounds it feels like the Oldtown when I made the change from the glass boat which I can't lift anymore,i should note i'm 70!!

 
05/10/2016 05:53AM  
I have always rented kevlar solos such as the Magic, Prism, etc., which weigh 30-35 lbs.
 
05/10/2016 06:55AM  
My 16 ft. 1994 fiberglass Blackhawk comes in around 48 LBS. I will never sell this boat but do look forward to a new lighter one in the coming years.

 
HappyHuskies
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05/10/2016 07:21AM  
My heaviest solo was a DY Special in fiberglass. It weighed in around 42 pounds, I think (it's been many years since I sold it, so it may have been a few pounds heavier than this and I'm just not remembering correctly). I really liked that canoe and probably should not have sold it. My lightest boat is a Bell Magic Pro that I am currently paddling. It weighs in on my scale at 25 pounds. I know lighter boats are out there, but I really like paddling Magic's and this one has been making me smile for several years now.

 
ZaraSp00k
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05/10/2016 07:37AM  
my latest boat is lighter than my canoe paddle, The material is constructed from a micro-lattice of nickel phosphorous tubes that is 99.9% air. lightest metal ever

I cashed in my 401K for it.
 
MacCamper
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05/10/2016 09:42AM  
Loved traveling on the water in my 15 foot OPT Trapper wood/glass restored a couple of years ago. Absolutely beautiful to look at and super stable. But...a pig to portage and I quickly decided to only use it for trips requiring minimal overland options. My 16 foot Winona Adirondack was a great tandem/solo canoe at just under 40 pounds. It had huge capacity but also too much going on in an obnoxious wind.

Next week I head out in my 40 pound cedar strip built over the winter. From the two treks I've made on an area lake, I am going to love this Merlin as solo ride. Beautiful, light and stable. The best of all worlds.
Mac

 
05/10/2016 04:47PM  
my wood/canvas canoe weighs about 65 lbs. i've never weighed it. i've used it on about a half dozen solo trips.
 
Iowaypaddler
member (37)member
 
05/10/2016 04:48PM  
My first BW solo was in my dads Grumman 17. I had a Kevlar C-1 racer at the time, so I knew what a lite boat was, but I opted not to rent. I had a great time, but it wasn't long after that, that I bought a Kevlar UL Encounter, which I've had up there 3 times. As has been said on the water some extra is not that big of a deal. When I was Racing I never thought the guys with carbon fiber boats had a big advantage over me. Some of them beat me, and I beat some of them. The ones that beat me all the time probably could have beat me if they were using my dads boat. On land it's a different story. At some point my gram pa stopped paddling unless someone else was carrying his Cedar strip behemoth. Same way with my dad. I hope I can do this for a while to come and boats that weigh less should help. By the way FOG51 does your Deep Creek have the checker board Carbon? If it does I think you have my next boat.
 
05/11/2016 07:27AM  
Weight is more of a issue when portaging. Don't over think it. Get the lightest canoe you can afford and enjoy.
 
05/11/2016 04:20PM  
My current boat is, I believe, in the area of 43#. It is royalex. I have used some boats below 40#s, but ones I have owned have either been wood strip or royalex, and in one case a fiberglass/kevlar. All were in the lower - mid 40s.
 
MagicPaddler
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05/12/2016 07:24AM  
Light boats make it possible for old men to still go on trips.
 photo RapidFire.jpg
 
muddyfeet
distinguished member(753)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/21/2016 01:42PM  
quote MagicPaddler: "Light boats make it possible for old men to still go on trips.
"


And young men, with lots of gear tied to the canoe:



To the OP's question: rented 28b Magic with ~10lbs mounted/stowed gear.
 
GoSpursGo
distinguished member (280)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/21/2016 02:09PM  
Started out with an alumacraft (65ish) tin can like the others on here - quickly changed to a Spirit II (42lbs)

Next year Ill rent a Northwind Solo (29lbs)
 
blackdawg9
distinguished member (141)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/21/2016 03:02PM  
i think my 16 foot old town penobscot is 88 pounds, maybe a tad heavier.

i had no problem with that weight on long portages, when i was 24. now at 40 it sucks. you can always get a few collapsible water bladders, to put weight in the bow or stern, if need be. the big problem is a high profile and caching wind and still being able to travel, where you want.
 
1JimD
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06/21/2016 09:31PM  
Funny how lighter boats motivate more paddlin !
I made a Kevlar copy of one of my strippers, and use it all the time.

I'm retired now, and have never paddled so much !

Jim
 
06/23/2016 12:57PM  
Old Alumacraft 65# which I sold, stuff weave wilderness 43# I use on the local lakes and rivers , sundowner tandem 40#, kevlar wilderness 32# my bwca tripper.
 
yellowcanoe
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06/23/2016 05:05PM  
quote 1JimD: " Funny how lighter boats motivate more paddlin !
I made a Kevlar copy of one of my strippers, and use it all the time.


I'm retired now, and have never paddled so much !


Jim"


amen.. amen.. I love boats in the 30-40 lb range for amenable hiking and frequent use
 
jcavenagh
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06/24/2016 08:12AM  
I paddle a Wenonah Prism. Depending on what I am carrying, i.e. 1 paddle or 2, fishing rod or not, Crazy Creek seat or not, it comes in between 33-37 lbs.

This boat tracks straight and is easy to paddle on a lake. In a twisty little creek it is a bit difficult to maneuver.
 
06/24/2016 09:57AM  
quote MagicPaddler: "Light boats make it possible for old men to still go on trips.
 photo RapidFire.jpg
"




Magicpaddler is one of the best trippers I've paddled with. It's embarrassing when your struggling on a portage and he trots by you with pack on carrying the boat like that. Haha.
 
MagicPaddler
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06/24/2016 12:16PM  
quote nctry: "quote MagicPaddler: "Light boats make it possible for old men to still go on trips.
 photo RapidFire.jpg
"




Magicpaddler is one of the best trippers I've paddled with. It's embarrassing when your struggling on a portage and he trots by you with pack on carrying the boat like that. Haha."

And now you know the secret. Smaller lighter boats are easier to carry and they go around sharp corners in creeks easier. Nctry we will need to do it again.
 
06/24/2016 12:41PM  
quote MagicPaddler: "Light boats make it possible for old men to still go on trips.
 photo RapidFire.jpg
"


I love this pic! Also glad that Placid is doing well after the fire.
 
Marten
distinguished member (421)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/25/2016 06:55PM  
It seems everyone has gone to a lighter canoe when they could. Must be an answer in that! If you are approaching middle age and not getting the lightest boat that will work you are making a costly mistake.
 
ZaraSp00k
distinguished member(1483)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/27/2016 10:29AM  
quote butthead: "Heavy canoes and what I interpret ride quality, have little if anything to do with each other. I have used dedicated solos, Wenonah Moccasin 38 pounds, and Advantage 32 pounds. Both have handled big water/wind well, both fun and a joy to paddle.


butthead"


I agree, my Voyager weighs 36 pounds, my other solo weighs 49 pounds, on the water you'd never know the one weighs 13 pounds more than the other, in fact you'd probably guess it was lighter, it sure feels like it because it feels like it is getting tossed around by the waves, has a tippy feel to it but in fact is very seaworthy
 
ockycamper
distinguished member(554)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/27/2016 07:15PM  
I had a Wenonah Voyager in ultralight kevlar a couple of years ago. . .35 lbs. Didn't use it around here so decided to sell it. Now I have a Wilderness in Royalex. Sure wish I had kept the Voyager.
 
07/06/2016 11:39AM  
quote FOG51: "Started out in a 17 foot Alu tin can, [about 75 pds] used that many miles and years, then moved up to a Mad River Traveler, fiberglass and gel coat [about 60 pounds] used that a couple of years and several trips. Currently paddeling a Savage River carbon-extreme Deep Creek Solo weighs 29 pounds. As I progress in years I get smarter. FRED"

I didn't start with the aluminum canoe unless I count that first time my wife and went out on the Deerfield River (MA) and toted that heavy beast down to the water. We had a Old Town Penobscot, 58lbs to start out with. Then I moved on to a Wenonah Champlain at about 55lbs that I solo'ed for a season or two at 46lbs. Moving on to a slightly lighter craft, I picked up a Q17, 44lbs but adding back in a spring-creek drop in seat and a couple of paddles, the weight was tipped over 50lbs per carry.

This year I was determined to shed weight and purchased a Northwind Solo at 29lbs. This has made all the difference as it's featherlight compared to our other boats.
 
07/06/2016 12:41PM  
In my 30's I trotted a 70+ Lowe Line and front and pack Duluth packs over portages. Now I take a leisurely stroll over with my Carbon fiber Magic and CCS rucksack. Age does give wisdom, and a little more discretionary money for hobbies.
 
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