BWCA How to keep campfire soot off cookware? Boundary Waters BWCA Food and Recipes
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linkster
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03/30/2014 06:43AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
We cook over several fires during the course of a trip to conserve on fuel or because we are using the reflector oven. We always coat our cookware with liquid soap. We don't always let it dry and have varying degrees of success. We try not to use sappy wood and let the coals develop before cooking. Do you think bar soap will work better? Have you ever lined the outside of your cookware with tinfoil?
 
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03/30/2014 12:51PM  
About the only time we cook over fire is for wilderness pizza. We bring in the premade pizza crusts. I have wondered how folks keep their pots clean who cook over fire. Do you soap up your pots before every meal prepared over fire? Just wondering. That would seem to introduce a lot of soap to environment.

 
dogwoodgirl
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03/30/2014 01:08PM  
I just don't worry about it. It's going to get sooty. Back in the old days we did coat our cookware with soap, but that is a lot of soap!

If you are trying to keep the soot off your packs, you can slip a burlap sack around your cookware, but I have just accepted that the cook pack is sooty.
 
schweady
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03/30/2014 05:01PM  
Dawn liquid dish soap works better than any other for whatever reason.

Yeah, I've heard it's better to let them get black.
 
RainGearRight
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04/01/2014 12:00PM  
Heavy duty Tin foil on the bottom and sides of the pot
 
Cedarboy
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04/01/2014 01:04PM  
Blackened pots are a badge of honor! They are proof you were out there haveing a great time. Scrubbing pots until they sparkle is a make work/waste of time IMO. Anything other than bio soap should not be used in the BWCAW, and always away from shore, never in/by the lake. Ltes all pretend we didnt read about the Dawn.
We soaped pots in the 70's, when I grew up in Scouts, we also trenched around tents. Glad things have changed.
CB
 
CrookedPaddler1
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04/01/2014 01:29PM  
I cook exclusively over the campfire, the only exception being during a fire ban. I have stainless steel pots. During the trip, they are packed into there own carrying case (large bag) to prevent soot from getting other equipment dirty. When I get home, I took some spray on oven cleaner, spray the pots, let them sit for about 20 minutes, and scrub lightly with a brillo pad. 90% of the black is gone in short order, and they will be safe to pack away with getting anything it touches dirty.

caution -- don't do this on aluminium cookware!
 
HammerII
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04/01/2014 04:19PM  
I reach down and grab a handful of sand at the waters edge and scrub the outside of the pot. Wipe it dry and return it to its cooking sack. They do have a few dents and scratches and a darken "patina" but so far this has saved me from having to deal with soot overed stuff in the pack.
 
04/01/2014 04:56PM  
I used to cook on the fire, but I discovered that I hate dirty sooty pots...so I always use a stove, and it's faster to use a stove.
 
FOG51
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04/02/2014 03:14AM  
I rub my pots with Lava hand soap brefore we leave home, put them in a stuff sack and don't wash them till I get home, then use a SOS pad, they shine like new till the next trip. Well actually I do wash the inside during the trip. FRED
 
FOG51
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04/02/2014 03:14AM  
I rub my pots with Lava hand soap brefore we leave home, put them in a stuff sack and don't wash them till I get home, then use a SOS pad, they shine like new till the next trip. Well actually I do wash the inside during the trip. FRED
 
04/02/2014 10:25PM  
quote Cedarboy: "Blackened pots are a badge of honor! They are proof you were out there haveing a great time. Scrubbing pots until they sparkle is a make work/waste of time IMO. Anything other than bio soap should not be used in the BWCAW, and always away from shore, never in/by the lake. Ltes all pretend we didnt read about the Dawn.
We soaped pots in the 70's, when I grew up in Scouts, we also trenched around tents. Glad things have changed.
CB
"


+1
 
04/09/2014 04:23PM  
yes blacken pots can be a badge of honor but when i go on my next trip i like to start with soot free pans
 
04/14/2014 06:41PM  
Me, too.

quote HammerII: "I reach down and grab a handful of sand at the waters edge and scrub the outside of the pot. Wipe it dry and return it to its cooking sack. They do have a few dents and scratches and a darken "patina" but so far this has saved me from having to deal with soot overed stuff in the pack.
"
 
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