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BAKA
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03/25/2017 09:09AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
Any good rod holders for canoe trolling? Either bought or hand made is fine. Photos or links appreciated.
 
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03/25/2017 10:06AM  
The Rod Sentry is a good choice and about as light weight as you will find.
 
03/25/2017 11:20AM  
I have two of these. They turn 360 and lock into place really well. You can order it from boatersbits.
 
RainGearRight
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03/25/2017 01:57PM  
Scotty Rod Holder with the Rail bracket. Works pretty darn good. I leave the bracket on and the rod holder comes off when not in use. I had two rod sentrys and was less than impressed. They are small and light but the aluminum seemed too soft for the screws. I had to used a pliers to get them tight enough. Kinda a pain.
 
gymcoachdon
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03/25/2017 07:07PM  
This is what I use, and I have been happy with it:
Tite-Lok

The base would screw onto a center thwart on a tandem, but it is too big to fit on the solo thwart, so I had to modify it a bit:

 
old_salt
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03/25/2017 09:13PM  
quote gymcoachdon: "This is what I use, and I have been happy with it:
Tite-Lok


The base would screw onto a center thwart on a tandem, but it is too big to fit on the solo thwart, so I had to modify it a bit:

"


+1
 
RainGearRight
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03/25/2017 09:37PM  
quote old_salt: "
quote gymcoachdon: "This is what I use, and I have been happy with it:
Tite-Lok



The base would screw onto a center thwart on a tandem, but it is too big to fit on the solo thwart, so I had to modify it a bit:

"



+1"


Center thwart like the yoke? That's a pretty long ways away from the stern on most canoes. Do they have an attachment for the round thwarts? I remember looking at them a few years ago and liking thier ability to adjust.
 
AtwaterGA
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03/26/2017 05:43AM  
We use the one that Piragis sells. We have been very happy with it and have used it for many years.
 
Savage Voyageur
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03/26/2017 07:30AM  
Someone here made a very nice Oak board that clamped onto the both thwarts. It held thier fish finder, rod holder, with hooks and eye bolts and holes for hanging things. I saved the picture and I'm going to build one myself.
 
QueticoMike
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03/26/2017 08:31AM  
I just hold the rod down with my foot. Much easier to access when you get a hit :)
 
BnD
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03/26/2017 10:00AM  
I'm kinda with Mike on this one. We own and have used Scottys with round bar mounts and rod sentries. However, we don't do much trolling so it's not worth the extra weight and pack space for us to carry dedicated rod holders for trolling. Just use your foot. It's not stylish or as convienent but it works and you have nothing else to buy, pack and portage. My 0.02
 
RackWrangler
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03/26/2017 11:32PM  
quote Savage Voyageur: "Someone here made a very nice Oak board that clamped onto the both thwarts. It held thier fish finder, rod holder, with hooks and eye bolts and holes for hanging things. I saved the picture and I'm going to build one myself. "


I saw that "command center" photo also and made one very similar for my trip last year with rented canoes. It was perfect! Rod holder, fish finder, battery box for finder, and rings for attaching my water bottle with small s-biners. I will be making a few more for other members of our group for this years trip.

Here's the link. The "Command Cener" is towards the bottom of the thread.

http://bwca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=forum.thread&threadId=777924&forumID=14&confID=1

- RW
 
mastertangler
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03/28/2017 04:58AM  
As most folks around here know I am a big proponent of rod holders and frown rather snidely at the "just wedge it under something" crowd (with all due respect etc. etc.) thinking that is just so much foolish nonsense. But hey, everybody has their pet peeves right?

Anyway, the aluminum model which has been pictured will suit you very nicely for average run of the mill canoe country gear and tactics. I gave mine away however to someone on this board (or maybe it was another board?) and have replaced it with the ultimate rod holder. And that is.........(wait for it;-)...............a Ram Rod 2000.

Hands down it is tops in almost every respect. I say almost because you have to mount it so you need to have your own boat as it is not a clamp on. One of the biggest advantages is that it pops your rod up off the gunnels some 8" creating clearing for your paddle. You can still have your rod within easy reach AND angled at a 45 back towards your lure (creating the correct tension to snatch a fish) all while having a nice open area to dip your paddle. Throw in that it is light and indestructible AND has a safety clip and securely grabs both spinning and bait casting equipment with confidence. I run high end equipment and the aluminum "forked stick" rod holder just didn't offer enough security for trolling large lures and heavy line. Its fine for smaller crank baits and drifting live bait however.

Pay attention to the mounting options.......I purchased the side mount and put it in just under my gunnels using just the top screw holes on the mounting plate and used stainless hardware of course. Ram Rod 2000
 
03/28/2017 12:32PM  
Behind one ankle and in front of the other shin... its free too. The best in my opinion, different mounting options, depending on user.
 
schweady
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03/28/2017 01:54PM  
Long time leg-lock user, then long time Rod Sentry user. Both had advantages and disadvantages and I'd often switch off.

But last year, I went on a mission to find an improved holder, and settled on the RAM-Rod 2007, mostly on mastertangler's recommendation. Identical to mt's RAM 2000 in every respect except for the ball mounting system. Perfection, right?

Hated it.

After multiple fumbles while removing the rod from the holder, and more than enough missed strikes, I examined the holder's design more closely and came to the realization that this was designed for a baitcasting setup. The recesses in the holder's cradle seem best suited for the spool and crank spindle on a baitcaster, and not so much for my spinning outfit.

Went back to leg-lock mode for the remainder of the trip and back to feeling and immediately setting on those strikes.

My quest continues, however, and it seems like RAM just has to make a holder better suited for a spinning rod/reel combo. Trouble is, they don't list info on suited rod/reel type as part of their product specs and images with rods in the holders are scarce.

Still considering:
RAM Tube Jr. - but wonder about having to slide rod away from me to remove
RAM-TUBE 2008 - but wonder how securely the rod is held (And, there's a beefier one, named Tough-Tube, but no ball mounts seen.)
RAM-TUBE 2000 - again, secure?
RAM-ROD 2007 Fly Rod Jr. - I considered this one last year but wondered about rod security. Also, 'Fly Rod' in the title kind of threw me
RAM-ROD Light-Speed - this could be the one. But, the price!
(Edit: Just looked at some videos... it's huge! Now, I notice in the specs: 1.9 lbs! Probably leg-locking in 2017.)
 
thinblueline
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03/28/2017 06:18PM  
The bow paddler holding his rod or locking it behind a leg doesn't get the end of his rod, and subsequently his line, far enough to the side of the boat, particularly during turns, to avoid getting wrapped up in the stern paddler. Locking behind a leg for the stern paddler works, but I detest not being able to move my legs and feet at will to avoid cramps or legs/feet falling asleep. Rod holders take care of these problems by getting both lines out of the way, allowing freedom of movement, and seemingly getting better hook sets and/or fewer lost fish. That is my personal experience. Others may have different opinions and experience.

I tried the rod sentry and found them to be a good concept while they lasted...which wasn't long. You couldn't get them tight enough with your fingers and the soft metal stripped and dented when trying to get them tight enough. They would be better with better materials.

The best thing I've found and continue to use is the Tite-Lok with C-clamp. I use two pieces of stained 3"x5"X 1/4" plywood on each side of the canoe to really crank the rod holder down without damaging the Kevlar. Works like a charm, and all the angles and turns are fully adjustable. This rod holder gives me the least headaches and best results.
 
Grizzlyman
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03/28/2017 07:30PM  
I've tried a number of rodholders. My favorite so Far is a piece of PVC like this. It doesn't get in the way and is always there.

 
schweady
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03/28/2017 07:53PM  
quote thinblueline: "The bow paddler holding his rod or locking it behind a leg doesn't get the end of his rod, and subsequently his line, far enough to the side of the boat, particularly during turns, to avoid getting wrapped up in the stern paddler. Locking behind a leg for the stern paddler works, but I detest not being able to move my legs and feet at will to avoid cramps or legs/feet falling asleep. Rod holders take care of these problems by getting both lines out of the way, allowing freedom of movement, and seemingly getting better hook sets and/or fewer lost fish. That is my personal experience. Others may have different opinions and experience."

As you say, YMMV. My bow partners all know that I expect them to fish, only fish, and enjoy the fishing. Except for when I am hooked, we are moving to a distant spot, or we find ourselves in some wind or wave predicament, they don't paddle. Much easier to control speed and direction that way, basing it on what I'm seeing on the finder, the gps, and our surroundings. A good fisherperson knows where to hold their rod tip when in various trolling patterns, turns, and windy conditions in order to keep it away from my business. So far, so good, without need for the bowman using a rod holder.

quote thinblueline: "I tried the rod sentry and found them to be a good concept while they lasted...which wasn't long. You couldn't get them tight enough with your fingers and the soft metal stripped and dented when trying to get them tight enough. They would be better with better materials."

I wish I could feel better about saying this, patents and copyrights and all that, but maybe one of our metalworking members could take this up as a project. Yes, I cringe at hearing folks who saved a few cents apiece by making their own BDBs, but the Rod Sentry is almost perfect, except for this one particular deficiency in its quality. Maybe its ability to tighten properly or stand up to stress on occasion is going to always be compromised by the materials choice made to keep it as lightweight as possible, but it sure would be nice to see one made that was stronger, or with smarter positions for the wing nuts, even if it weighed a few ounces more.

 
Savage Voyageur
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03/28/2017 09:13PM  
Thank you Schweady and Mastertangler. That Ramrod 2007 looks like the ticket. I will own one of these for my next trip.
 
03/28/2017 10:24PM  
When I do serious trolling I use my Folbe Jr It is a little heavy but so easy to use.

Short trolling trips I just do the wedge method but if you are trolling g all day covering ground the wedge method sucks... at least I need to move my feet and re-adjust a lot. Plus with a rod holder you can vary the angle of the rod easier, which can make a huge difference in hook ups or even presentation.

T
 
03/28/2017 11:00PM  
+1 Timatkn .... Folbe rod holder is the one I use. It will handle Spinning and Baitcasting setups. It releases easily. The best I have seem.
 
mastertangler
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03/29/2017 05:25AM  
FWIW.......There should be no "fumbling" to remove a rod from its holder resulting in "missed strikes"..........what that tells me is that the physics are all wrong begin with.

Explain please........what I am saying is when the physics are correct the fish hooks itself without any help from the angler. In fact I seldom remove a rod from its holder with any sense of urgency whatsoever and rather I might rather yawn and maybe stretch a bit.......who knows, maybe even have a cup of coffee before getting to the stressful task of reeling in another whopper (or 24" pike as the case may be).

Here is what is happening to those who "miss" strikes and think they need to be able to "feel" the strike and react to it. In all likelihood there is not sufficient "load" or tension on the set up to snatch the fish. If your rod is angled out at 90 degrees (quite common) the much of the initial force which is applied by the strike is taken up by the rod bending and flexing towards the fish. This is simple physics and takes about 30 seconds of pondering to come to the correct realization and all it took was somebody pointing it out (thank you very much).

The correct load to put on a trolling lure negates much of the flex in the rod. In other words the rod is angled towards the lure. 45 degrees is a good starting point.........there are other aspects to consider as well........the action of the rod for example. Is it very stiff? Or does it have lots of flex? How about the diameter of the hooks? Big thick hooks require greater force than small diameter hooks.

When your set up is correct everything is steel trap tight and in fact I liken my trolling set ups to a trap. If a fish so much as sniffs at my lure it goes off. Tight, tight, tight is the word . With all this tightness drags have to be set to perfection especially if your whisking about as I am prone to do in August.

Bottom line........if your missing bites while trolling it has nothing to do with the rod holder but rather operator error. There is no need to make haste to get a rod when a fish strikes because, if done correctly, that fish isn't going anywhere and the forward momentum of the boat insures you stay connected........and in fact if you are hasty getting to fish and particularly if you fish braid there is a greater likelihood that you are "pulling" hooks by being to aggressive. In other words you forcefully pull the hooks right out of the fishes mouth by thinking you need to "set" a hook which has already been set.

Whew!
 
mastertangler
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03/29/2017 05:25AM  
FWIW.......There should be no "fumbling" to remove a rod from its holder resulting in "missed strikes"..........what that tells me is that the physics are all wrong begin with.

Explain please........what I am saying is when the physics are correct the fish hooks itself without any help from the angler. In fact I seldom remove a rod from its holder with any sense of urgency whatsoever and rather I might rather yawn and maybe stretch a bit.......who knows, maybe even have a cup of coffee before getting to the stressful task of reeling in another whopper (or 24" pike as the case may be).

Here is what is happening to those who "miss" strikes and think they need to be able to "feel" the strike and react to it. In all likelihood there is not sufficient "load" or tension on the set up to snatch the fish to begin with. If your rod is angled out at 90 degrees (quite common) the much of the initial force which is applied by the strike is taken up by the rod bending and flexing towards the fish. This is simple physics and takes about 30 seconds of pondering to come to the correct realization and all it took was somebody pointing it out (thank you very much).

The correct load to put on a trolling lure negates much of the flex in the rod. In other words the rod is angled towards the lure. 45 degrees is a good starting point.........there are other aspects to consider as well........the action of the rod for example. Is it very stiff? Or does it have lots of flex? How about the diameter of the hooks? Big thick hooks require greater force than small diameter hooks.

When your set up is correct everything is steel trap tight and in fact I liken my trolling set ups to a trap. If a fish so much as sniffs at my lure it goes off. Tight, tight, tight is the word . With all this tightness drags have to be set to perfection especially if your whisking about as I am prone to do in August.

Bottom line........if your missing bites while trolling it has nothing to do with the rod holder but rather operator error. There is no need to make haste to get a rod when a fish strikes because, if done correctly, that fish isn't going anywhere and the forward momentum of the boat insures you stay connected........and in fact if you are hasty getting to fish and particularly if you fish braid there is a greater likelihood that you are "pulling" hooks by being to aggressive. In other words you forcefully pull the hooks right out of the fishes mouth by thinking you need to "set" a hook which has already been set.

 
mastertangler
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03/29/2017 05:54AM  
quote Savage Voyageur: "Thank you Schweady and Mastertangler. That Ramrod 2007 looks like the ticket. I will own one of these for my next trip. "


Its a good set up especially if you don't have metal gunnels. I like the machining capabilities of metal and that has been beneficial for me. The Ram Rod system works just fine with spinning and bait casting and I have not noticed any issues which would go against my paddling philosophy of "no hassles".

Use the safety clip........set the angle correctly and don't rush to get the rod out, the fish isn't going anywhere but in your fish gripper.
 
aholmgren
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03/29/2017 09:04AM  
quote RainGearRight: "
quote old_salt: "
quote gymcoachdon: "This is what I use, and I have been happy with it:
Tite-Lok



The base would screw onto a center thwart on a tandem, but it is too big to fit on the solo thwart, so I had to modify it a bit:

"




+1"



Center thwart like the yoke? That's a pretty long ways away from the stern on most canoes. Do they have an attachment for the round thwarts? I remember looking at them a few years ago and liking thier ability to adjust."



I use this one and really like it, mounts to round/square/oval thwarts... Tike-Lok rod holder with Clamp
 
schweady
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03/29/2017 09:35AM  
mt: It's not so much a matter of haste... the RAM-ROD 2007 is simply not designed to properly hold and allow a smooth pickup of a spinning setup, it appears to be more suited for bait casters.

We fish walleyes, pretty much exclusively. 40 years of walleye fishing has taught me that any slack line, even after a decent hookset, will do you in every time. The slack allowed when removing a spinning rod from that holder, especially the sliding away from you out of that bottom part of the cradle, can allow the walleye to turn and flee. No 'best' way to pick up your rod at the reel seat, and just so much plastic in the way, touching your bail or crank handle... Not every time, of course, just a whole lot worse percentage than when removing a rod from a Rod Sentry. Of course, it may a lot easier when not preoccupied with all of the other stuff going on in a canoe; it may be much easier from the platform of a bass boat, for instance.

Bonus: After fiddling with it today, the jury may still be out on my claims of bait cast design bias, but trying it out with the reel hanging on either side of the cradle still made a less-than-slick rod pickup...

 
RainGearRight
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03/29/2017 09:47AM  
quote aholmgren: "double post, sorry

I use this one and really like it, mounts to round/square/oval thwarts... Tike-Lok rod holder with Clamp "


ugh great thanks... Now I have to buy it. :)

I like my Scotty alright but I have a gear buying problem. That little voice says " what if this thing that does the same thing as the thing you already have works a little bit better?"

Its a sickness.
 
RackWrangler
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03/29/2017 03:03PM  
quote schweady: "mt: It's not so much a matter of haste... the RAM-ROD 2007 is simply not designed to properly hold and allow a smooth pickup of a spinning setup, it appears to be more suited for bait casters.


We fish walleyes, pretty much exclusively. 40 years of walleye fishing has taught me that any slack line, even after a decent hookset, will do you in every time. The slack allowed when removing a spinning rod from that holder, especially the sliding away from you out of that bottom part of the cradle, can allow the walleye to turn and flee. No 'best' way to pick up your rod at the reel seat, and just so much plastic in the way, touching your bail or crank handle... Not every time, of course, just a whole lot worse percentage than when removing a rod from a Rod Sentry. Of course, it may a lot easier when not preoccupied with all of the other stuff going on in a canoe; it may be much easier from the platform of a bass boat, for instance.


Bonus: After fiddling with it today, the jury may still be out on my claims of bait cast design bias, but trying it out with the reel hanging on either side of the cradle still made a less-than-slick rod pickup...

"




Schweady, Try putting the spinning reel in the end of the holder. This is what I do and it works perfect...easy to remove, and no chance of your line getting caught on the holder.

=RW



 
mastertangler
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03/30/2017 06:11AM  
HA! Schweady you have my set up in your pictures.........Stradic reels, loomis rods and a Ram Rod holder. And yes that is exactly how I use my rod holder with spinning with the reel off to the side. I have not noticed any difficultly in removal and I am a stickler for such things (No Hassle philosophy).

Another reason rods should be angled back towards the lure is ease of removal. If angled out at a 90 degree there is max pressure on the rod making it much harder to remove possibly resulting in slack, which as you state is to be avoided at all costs. With the rod angled at a 45 towards the lure/fish the rod slides out easily since the pressure is actually helping in the rods removal.

If you hate using the rod holder and are missing fish due to slack line I suspect this may be part of the problem.

And, if you are like me, and spend quite a bit of time trolling I find rod length a big factor with trolling success. I like length and 8' is what i generally gravitate to. When walleye trolling with crank baits I use a steelhead rod which loads very substantially and there is virtually little or no chance of slack line after hook up. There is something about the transfer of energy with the long rod rod which makes it supremely effective for not only hooking fish but also in not pulling hooks. And if conditions are tough........mid day bright sun for example, I can still run a deep diving crank on line as light as 6lb test (kids don't try this at home) and all while flying along. The light line can really make the difference some times but you have better have your ducks in a row as the average walleye in August at 28ft is usually around 5lbs and the average pike is in the 30's. Strikes are often quite savage since I am trolling quickly..........the long rod absorbs much of the violence and protects the light line all while insuring an excellent hook up percentage. A fas snap clip insures 100% knot strength. There is no room for error in that scenario.
 
schweady
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03/30/2017 11:33AM  
mt: I use a 6-1/2 foot rod loaded with 6 lb line and no leader almost all of the time. Tempted to find a longer rod, esp. when considering being prepared for some looper fishing some day. But might not be thinking of purchasing a new rod just for canoe trips, who knows??

I think I am convinced to haul the RAM along one more time and try angling it back. But I am concerned that it would interfere with my trolling paddling. We shall see. Perhaps I go prepared with both the RAM and the Sentry, ounces be darned...

Do you prefer hanging the reel as in my left photo? or right? or no matter? (As you see, I crank with my left)

And, RackWrangler: I was all tempted to try your 'spinning reel in the end of the holder' tip, feeling that I was just having one of those "Doh!" senior moments, but seems like there would be no security against a strike or snag making off with the rod. Especially if I try angling it backwards...
 
BnD
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03/30/2017 01:25PM  
Schweady I am working on a DIY rod holder using this RAM ziptie Thwart Base as a quick snap on/off attachment. That is what I use for my GPS unit mounted on the thwart in front of me it weighs 2 ounces. Using that base and using some 2" Dia. HDPE pipe tubing skeletonized I think you could have a rod holder that would snap on/off, weigh mere ounces and pack to virtually nothing.

I got intrigued by all the rube goldburg rod holders I see in pics that really don't work for back country canoe fishing. (i.e. too heavy, too bulky, too complicated, don't mount well, etc....). I'm working on it I'll post if/when I have a working prototype made. I'm waiting on a RAM base to move forward.
 
RackWrangler
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03/30/2017 05:36PM  
quote schweady: "mt: I use a 6-1/2 foot rod loaded with 6 lb line and no leader almost all of the time. Tempted to find a longer rod, esp. when considering being prepared for some looper fishing some day. But might not be thinking of purchasing a new rod just for canoe trips, who knows??


I think I am convinced to haul the RAM along one more time and try angling it back. But I am concerned that it would interfere with my trolling paddling. We shall see. Perhaps I go prepared with both the RAM and the Sentry, ounces be darned...


Do you prefer hanging the reel as in my left photo? or right? or no matter? (As you see, I crank with my left)


And, RackWrangler: I was all tempted to try your 'spinning reel in the end of the holder' tip, feeling that I was just having one of those "Doh!" senior moments, but seems like there would be no security against a strike or snag making off with the rod. Especially if I try angling it backwards...
"


You are right about the issue of no protection, but usually run my rod at about 45 degrees back and 45 degrees up. With this setup, there has been no unwanted movement from fish or snags, and the drag does it's job. Angled like this is the way you see most trolling boats set up. MT is the expert, I'm just a guy that likes to fish, and probably watched too many Wicked Tuna episodes.

-RW
 
03/30/2017 05:36PM  
quote QueticoMike: "I just hold the rod down with my foot. Much easier to access when you get a hit :)"


Yep. Or my knees.
 
03/30/2017 05:50PM  
I've had the Piragis one for years. If I use it I just lay the rod in the u shaped parts without the hold down. I don't use it much anymore and have perfected the brace against the left knee/right ankle technique. I like the immediate rod to finish access. Using a holder there is a gap between getting a hold of the fish right away which has resulted in lost fish for me.
 
mastertangler
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03/31/2017 07:07AM  
Scat.......length of time between the fish striking, getting hooked and WHEN or how quickly you grab the rod has little or nothing to do with success IMHO. Most likely the fish was never hooked that well to begin with, the likely culprit being a rod which was angled out at 90 degrees to the boat and the flexing of the rod used up most of the hook setting force which was required for success. You should never, ever, have to "set" the hook on a trolled fish.......it should already be set and that far better than propping it between your knees or holding it down with your foot. Using body parts are actually the worst possible option to secure a rod.........why is that? Because they are generally not a "fixed" position. They are not "static" and immovable. All things being equal the body proppers are much more likely to move or flex or otherwise absorb energy upon a strike. Its simple physics.

Can you catch fish by propping a rod. Of course but its just not the way a serious angler should troll especially when the alternative is so much easier and not only easier but far more effective.

Schweady much depends on where your mount is as to wether you can angle your rod back or not. Mine is at the top lip of my gunnel. Others may mount on a thwart.......that position, if not moved to the very edge of the boat, coupled with a short rod is a distinct handicap for paddling and will make it all but impossible to achieve the correct angle (tightness). Paddling needs to be free and easy without concern for banging a rod. The longer rod will be much better. My advice is to do as I have done and get a two piece 8' steelhead rod rated for the lb test you desire........say 6lb to 12lb would be ideal. Angled at a 45 degree angle back, and slightly elevated if need be to gain paddling clearance (I often, however, troll the big long rod fully loaded with the tip only several inches from the water surface > actually angled downward to gain additional lure depth > but with the rod butt elevated 8" off my gunnel there is still plenty of room for my paddle).

The other thing a static position provides for you is a consistent opportunity to view your rod tip. You glance to your side and since everything is locked down tight you are reducing the amount of variables which act upon the rod (no shifting of body as per what the proppers experience) and thus you really start to get a much better "feel" for what your lure is doing. You easily notice the wobble as well as what the usual load on the rod is. Did you pick up a 6" smallmouth and its swimming along? Or did you pick up a tiny twig? These sorts of minute differences are more easily noticed with a rod holder because you have limited the variables. Rocket science? Hardly........just better is all.

Be brave, try the steelhead rod and you won't look back I promise. It also excels as a slip bobber rod and when tossing light lures long distances. Its disadvantage, especially if you get a slightly heavier model, is its not something you want to cast with all day from a seated position. But for light line trolling (6 to 10b test) it has no equal or peer IMO when coupled with a rod holder and angled correctly. Bottom line.......If trolling is a significant part of your equation (or slip bobber fishing) the the steelhead rod is the way to go IMO. It does not really matter much which way you set the reel in the holder BTW........whatever is easier.

One last thought.......if you do go the steelhead route do not get a medium action rod as it will be too limber. Get a fast action rod with a limber tip section but with a beefy butt section. You will be able to handle large fish with such a rod. The medium action rod will be a wet noodle and lack the beef required to handle larger lakers and pike.
 
03/31/2017 08:15AM  
I would agree with MT about keeping your rod loaded and not sending slack pulses down your line while fumbling with getting your rod out of a holder. In motorized boats you always put your rod holders in the back of the boat and when you grab the rod you are automatically pulling it forward and keeping tension in the line. Angling it down in the holder helps even more because you will be pulling up also. In a canoe you usually have the holders in front of you so if you are not careful while grabbing your rod you will automatically put slack in your line while bringing it toward you. Long limber rods and mono would help. I prefer fireline and a little shorter stouter rod(6'6") because I contour troll with added weights. When I hook up I will take a few paddles or make a few cranks on my real to load the rod a little more. I have used tite lock and scotty holders and I also like to place the real infront and outside the holder for ease of removal. I have not had any issues with loosing a rod. It would be nice to angle the rod back, but as someone has noted it gets in the way of paddling.
 
mastertangler
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03/31/2017 11:29AM  
Excellent points Jim and shows the wide latitude in perspectives and the physics involved in getting a good hook-up while trolling. My reference point is generally mono when I troll for walleye and of course mono stretches. Braided line does not stretch and a shorter stiffer rod with a 90 degree angle out would snatch a fish just fine, at least with smaller diameter hooks. I agree with Jim that there is a greater chance of slack line with such a set up while removing it from a holder as well and steps should be taken to compensate. I also like the idea of a few forward strokes with such a set up (shorter rod,braid) especially if you are trolling slowly........crawler harness perhaps?

Trolling actually is a game of skill when done with focus, intent and purpose. A depth finder to follow a distinct depth contour is hugely helpful and the lures are just tools to get something into a "strike window" (the distance a fish will travel to bang a lure). Some days a walleye will come 5' off the bottom to smack something and other days the lure needs to pop them on the nose. The big advantage of trolling is being able to keep a lure constantly and consistently in that strike window until something good happens.

Hopefully some will get something out of the discussion while of course to some others it is blah, blah or so much hot air.

 
KerryG
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03/31/2017 12:23PM  
So here's the deal. I have a couple of Tough Claws lying around and I'm definitely not satisfied with my Tite Lok rig so I think it's time to give a RAM mount rod holder a try. Question for all you RAM mount users (MT, Schweady, WrackWrangler et al) which one? I fish mostly with a bait caster and I'm choosing between the RAM Rod 2007 and the RAM Tube Jr. I want the smallest, lightest and least intrusive natch. Opinions please.
 
mastertangler
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03/31/2017 03:51PM  
The obvious answer is the Ram Rod 2000 that MT uses ;-)

And heres why.........the Ram rod 2007 uses a ball and socket system which adds lots of extra weight. I have 2 of the 2007 on my redneck flats boat. They are heavy IMO. All the material to form the clamp, the actual ball etc. etc. all of that is completely unnecessary IMO.

The Ram Rod 2000 folds flat, is super light and super strong with minimal mounting hardware........Just a side mount bracket. I only used the top 2 holes in the mounting bracket drilling through where my metal gunnel lays down.

I generally detest tubes except on a nice big open salmon fishing boat with down riggers. Tubes can mean a lost outfit IMO especially if you like to run rods like I do which are generally pointed rearward.
 
KerryG
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03/31/2017 05:43PM  
quote mastertangler: "The obvious answer is the Ram Rod 2000 that MT uses ;-)


And heres why.........the Ram rod 2007 uses a ball and socket system which adds lots of extra weight. I have 2 of the 2007 on my redneck flats boat. They are heavy IMO. All the material to form the clamp, the actual ball etc. etc. all of that is completely unnecessary IMO.


The Ram Rod 2000 folds flat, is super light and super strong with minimal mounting hardware........Just a side mount bracket. I only used the top 2 holes in the mounting bracket drilling through where my metal gunnel lays down.


I generally detest tubes except on a nice big open salmon fishing boat with down riggers. Tubes can mean a lost outfit IMO especially if you like to run rods like I do which are generally pointed rearward. "

Yeah but I don't want to mount it permanently into my canoe, I actually want to use a tough claw base so maybe the RAM Tube Jr. is the best choice for me.
 
mastertangler
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04/01/2017 06:52AM  
Blah! tubes make me nervous........can you say "look there, a flying rod and reel........quick, where is my camera"!
 
mastertangler
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04/01/2017 09:22AM  
Ah yes, its all coming back to me.........before you pull the trigger on the tube let me attempt to dissuade you further.

I owned a stainless steel tube once years ago mounted as ball and socket. Pretty slick set up, or so I thought. I remember having to fight to get the rod out of the holder once a fish was on........the entire length of the tube as the rod was wedged in nice and tight. Easy going in but hard to get out......... Major hassle and thus violating the MT tripping creed of "No Hassles".

The tubes are great if your standing up and can lift straight up on them. Fine, perfect. But from a seated position they are a pain in the keister plus if you like to angle your rod back like I do there is the potential for your rod to take a swim.

My advice is don't go the tube route.
 
04/01/2017 11:05AM  
MT -you sure are fired up about this subject. I don't see how you could type that much. It would take me a week to type one of your responses. Keep up the good work. Cheers.
 
mastertangler
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04/01/2017 12:21PM  
quote scat: "MT -you sure are fired up about this subject. I don't see how you could type that much. It would take me a week to type one of your responses. Keep up the good work. Cheers."


Rod holders and trolling.........kinda like PB&J.......they just go together.

Yea my wife yells at me because I am banging away at the keyboard........"why do you have to hit those keys so hard" LOL.........besides, it gives me a chance to sit down for 15 minutes.................... Worked until 11;15 last night (slave driving boss).
 
Lotw
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04/01/2017 01:23PM  
I mounted up rams today. I run them in my boat and like them. I think the stern one will work out where I have it but the bow is quite a reach...oh well, I don't sit up there anyway!!

 
KerryG
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04/01/2017 09:23PM  
quote mastertangler: "Ah yes, its all coming back to me.........before you pull the trigger on the tube let me attempt to dissuade you further.


I owned a stainless steel tube once years ago mounted as ball and socket. Pretty slick set up, or so I thought. I remember having to fight to get the rod out of the holder once a fish was on........the entire length of the tube as the rod was wedged in nice and tight. Easy going in but hard to get out......... Major hassle and thus violating the MT tripping creed of "No Hassles".


The tubes are great if your standing up and can lift straight up on them. Fine, perfect. But from a seated position they are a pain in the keister plus if you like to angle your rod back like I do there is the potential for your rod to take a swim.


My advice is don't go the tube route. "

Such passion can't be ignored! I'll go with this one in that case. RAM Rod 2000
 
04/02/2017 07:39AM  
quote gymcoachdon: "This is what I use, and I have been happy with it:
Tite-Lok


The base would screw onto a center thwart on a tandem, but it is too big to fit on the solo thwart, so I had to modify it a bit:

"


This the rod holder I use, it's light and doesn't take much pack space. Sometimes I use the leg hold method and sometimes I use the rod holder it depends on the situation.
 
mastertangler
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04/02/2017 07:43AM  
quote Lotw: "I mounted up rams today. I run them in my boat and like them. I think the stern one will work out where I have it but the bow is quite a reach...oh well, I don't sit up there anyway!!

"


Since you have two rod holders I will have to let you have it with both barrels. And of course another friendship will go down in flames crashing and burning in the English countryside as per the Battle of Britain.

First off what are you thinking putting that rod holder in the bow. No good and a safety issue AND a hassle. Rather why not get a side mount (yes they make a side mount for the 2000) and mount it just under the gunnel along the molding? Push the side mount up against the top lip of the molding and then just drill out the TOP two sets of holes on the bracket and avoid the bottom ones which would be through the canoe proper. 2 screws will hold it. Use locking nuts and stainless hardware.



The mounting in the center of the thwart of the 2nd rod defeats much of the purpose of the rod holder...........you will not be able to angle your rod back at a 45 degree angle and still have room to paddle........it should of been pushed all the way to one side or the other. I understand in the center gives you an option of which side to troll off of but that pales in comparison to the advantages of paddle clearance. I have an extra mount......one on either side but usually just use one.

Lastly, if you take my advice and decide to move them, don't mount both on the same side. No, i'm not being a smartass it wouldn't be that hard to do. Truth be told most of us have done something dopey at one time or another. The last thing we need is more holes (I like your boat).

Now what to do with the extra holes in your nice boat? We could mount a mascot in the bow and you could ask the board for suggestions. I once seen a boat with a rather large camel once but my vote goes for a Shrek action figure. The other thwart holes you can plug with the appropriate stainless stove head bolt and corresponding nut.

One last observation........Go up to the Pictures that Scweady has of his spinning reels seated into the Ram Rod 2000 that are in this thread. That is the correct method IMO of putting a spinning reel into these rod holders. The spinning reel will not be hanging straight down but rather off to one side........much easier to remove. Don't forget to use the little safety clip.

You can hate me now but thank me later ;-)
 
MeatGun
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04/02/2017 08:57AM  
Spinning: Tite-Lok
Baitcaster: Scotty
When possible: prefer to hold the setup, feel the lure action, changes in action, light bites and especially hard bites!
 
04/02/2017 10:54AM  
quote Lotw: "I mounted up rams today. I run them in my boat and like them. I think the stern one will work out where I have it but the bow is quite a reach...oh well, I don't sit up there anyway!!

"


I have my Folbe Mounted in the bow similar--although it is a rail mount so a touch closer. It works but it is a reach. It allows the bow paddler to paddle easily, see the rod for strikes or snags. Feedback is variable. A fellow Paddler On this site didn't like the reach when we did a trip together, while my wife and brother liked the mount.

I prefer the stern mount to be on the far edge so it is out of the way for paddling on either side and get the lure further out from the boat. You'll have to try out your middle mount to see how it works for you though. I like that you can switch sides easily though. Disadvantages/advantages time will tell ya what you like.

T
 
04/02/2017 11:05AM  
Just read MT's post. I agree with his advice on rod holder placement minus the tone :) lol.

My 2 cents though is you already Mounted the rod holders I'd try them out to see how they work for you before putting more holes in the boat. They might be fine. If you end up not liking the placement then you have some good ideas to fall back on. I am always surprised by stuff that I think doesn't work seems to be perfect for another person :)

T
 
Lotw
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04/02/2017 11:34AM  
The beauty is I can add more bases. As far as running my rods at a 45....well I never do, pretty close to a 90 all the time.
I'm still trying to figure out how having one in the bow could be a safety issue?? Because of the reach? Your but doesn't need to leave the seat to reach the rod so I think we will be ok.

But now that you destroyed my work I'm going to make extra sure that it works perfectly and that I post pictures of large fish for master angler to see!!
 
mastertangler
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04/03/2017 05:28AM  
Um that would be 'Tangler with a "T"........I make no claim for being a Master-angler. And in fact if you see a black carbon fiber solo boat drifting across the lake being blown by the wind and a normally mild manner bloke with his head down mumbling unmentionables while getting a birds nest out........um, that would be me ;-)

Tone? Me? A less than cordial individual? God forbid! Alas, I am so misunderstood. I just wanted to get the lads attention is all.

Trolling rods at a 90 degree angle? Arrrrgh........all this typing for nought? Have you learned nothing grasshopper? Your homework assignment is to go back and print off what I have been espousing and place it under your pillow at night........perhaps this can be imparted through cerebral osmosis since my attempts at piscatorial education have fallen largely on deaf ears.

What advantage is 90 degrees? Why have the flex of the rod rob you of the energy which should be used to slap the hooks home? Try a little experiment.........pull on the line at 90 degrees and then pull on the line at 45. See the difference? HUGE. Just sayin. And the bigger the hooks the tighter the set up should be.

Are there exceptions.......yup, its fishing and there are always exceptions. Crawler harnesses pulled real slow benefit from a less than drum tight set up........giving them a bit of flex to eat is not such a bad thing while pulling crawlers at 1.5 mph.
 
Lotw
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04/03/2017 06:43AM  
Omg you're killing me! It's pretty hard to offend me so keep trying! It's good to hear others opinions and then disregard them....at least if you have enough experience to make your own choices!
But hearing those opinions is what brings me here so.....let's hear em!
 
04/03/2017 10:24AM  
"Trolling rods at a 90 degree angle? Arrrrgh........all this typing for nought? Have you learned nothing grasshopper? Your homework assignment is to go back and print off what I have been espousing and place it under your pillow at night........perhaps this can be imparted through cerebral osmosis since my attempts at piscatorial education have fallen largely on deaf ears.

What advantage is 90 degrees? Why have the flex of the rod rob you of the energy which should be used to slap the hooks home? Try a little experiment.........pull on the line at 90 degrees and then pull on the line at 45. See the difference? HUGE. Just sayin. And the bigger the hooks the tighter the set up should be."

Master Po, please forgive me for not understanding.
How could you get a better hook set on a 8' steal head rod with 6lb mono set at 45 degrees back vs my 6'6" medium rod with fireline set at 90 degrees?
Perhaps someone has switched incense in your shrine?
 
Jackfish
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04/03/2017 11:44AM  
Just to throw out an option to carrying extra weight and an extra piece of equipment, I lean the rod over the side of the canoe with the rod butt on the floor. I put one foot in front of the rod butt and my opposite shin behind the lower part of the rod. Often times, I'll have the first eye just inside the gunwale for support. I find that this system works beautifully for both bow and stern paddlers with rods out opposite sides of the canoe. It's a system proven over 30 years of canoe trips and our group couldn't imagine using a different method while tripping. We catch walleyes and northerns with this method, mostly by pulling crankbaits. However, back in the day before the live bait ban in Quetico, I pulled crawler harnesses behind bottom bouncers with great success. It's all about what you want to do.

Your mileage most likely will vary.
 
QueticoMike
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04/03/2017 11:49AM  
I'm glad I don't troll very often :) My fishing partner does not enjoy it. Not a big fan of it either. Kind of boring.
 
mastertangler
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04/03/2017 12:26PM  
I like all kinds of fishing and find trolling anything but boring. Its a thinking mans game with lots and lots of variables into play. What could possibly be boring about having to maintain concentration to keep a lure which runs 25ft in 28ft of water? Trolling is sort of like a big puzzle and when you plug everything into its correct socket and turn the switch on the results can be magical (like catching walleye between 4 and 7 lbs for 2 hours straight one after another ;-)..........Or popping 8lb lakers in North Bay on a regular basis........etc. etc. etc. etc. etc.

Lots of folks think baseball is boring. But when you understand the game it becomes quite fascinating. Will the pitcher throw a curve or a slider? Will it be in the strike zone even? Will the hitter guess correctly?

Jim, jim, jim....... Ahem.......just a bit of passion is all. Everybody has an opinion but some folks opinions carry more weight than others. Why is it so hard to understand that a 8'Steelhead rod angled back at a 45 degree angle is actually loaded near the end (butt section) of the rod which is probably more beefy than what most canoe country anglers are fishing with? Ever look carefully at a steelhead rod? They are designed to handle bigger and stronger fish than what is typically caught in the BWCA and on light line. Try turning a big steelhead in the current on a walleye rod......Not so easy.

But, take that same steelhead rod and angle it out at a 90 degree and the front half of the rod is whippy and will absorb much, if not all, of the energy required to set a hook. Look, its not really hard to understand if one takes about 5 seconds to think about it. A rod out at 90 is a mistake that inexperienced anglers make and in the interests of helping those who are not as experienced as the detractors I bring this forth. To those who are not "set in their ways" think long and hard about having to maintain your paddling position to keep your rod in place by propping it with your body parts all because you think a piece of gear weighing around 8 or 10oz is to much "trouble".

Exceptions? Yup, its fishing and there are always exceptions........got a nice stiff rod and braid? Sure have at it and put your set up at 90.......might even be better as you have less tendency to pull hooks. But for most canoe country gear you are better served using a lightweight adjustable rod holder angled back at 45 degrees, a depth finder and an assortment of trolling tools (lures). Especially if you fish walleye and are unfamiliar with the waters in which you find yourself. What is boring is not catching anything.......thats whats boring. Plus is there any other way through which you can continually present an offering at a sustained depth for long periods of time all while being extremely stealthy as trolling while under paddle? Nope, electric motors hum and outboards make plenty of racket. I can glide directly over the top of fish and they never know I am there.........that is the attraction of trolling for big canoe country fish. Plus I'm out seeing the sights, easing along, enjoying paddling, watching a moose or a beaver, learning new water and then Kerpow!

Want to be a complete angler? Learn to troll and learn to do it well and it will pay huge dividends even if other types of fishing is favored. What I mean is that trolling is the great info gatherer.......prefer casting? OK great........trolling will, if you pay attention, help you learn where to go back later and cast. The tactic provides clues....... especially if you have a depth finder. Ever play the original Tomb Raider? I loved it when I found something and she said "aha". Troll for several hours and you will have many "aha" moments that you can make use of later.
 
BnD
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04/04/2017 02:53AM  
Well MT, you've successfully scorched more earth with this topic. Some useful info but, you do realize there is a finite amount of earth to scorch eh?
 
mastertangler
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04/04/2017 02:41PM  
quote BnD: "Well MT, you've successfully scorched more earth with this topic. Some useful info but, you do realize there is a finite amount of earth to scorch eh?"


One day we need to sit down and have some cheese curds and a beverage. (I have never had a cheese curd but I bet they are good.....are they?)

Scorched earth? Hardly........certainly not in the circles I run. We get lots more animated than this.

Strong convictions presented with reason and without apology. I tell people plainly what I believe wether in business, pleasure or politics but more importantly I tell them why I believe it and then lay out the case. Isn't that how the upright ought to be? They used to call it being a straight shooter.......probably some other less than flattering monikers in this current day and age.

But maybe the trolling discussion will help some folks out, which is, after all, my sincere goal.

Having said that I will be the first to acknowledge that fishing is about doing things your own way. That is ultimately the most satisfying accomplishment in fishing. I like finding my own fish and catching them on something different than what everyone else is using.
So, bottom line, do whatever you think is best. Listen to all the chatter out there and adapt it to your own style.
 
mastertangler
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04/04/2017 04:27PM  
quote Lotw: "Omg you're killing me! It's pretty hard to offend me so keep trying! It's good to hear others opinions and then disregard them....at least if you have enough experience to make your own choices!
But hearing those opinions is what brings me here so.....let's hear em!"


Help me help you ;-)
 
Lyonboy
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04/05/2017 10:30AM  
This is easily the best rod holder I have used up in the boundary waters without actually mountain anything to my canoe.
 
Lyonboy
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04/05/2017 10:32AM  
quote Lyonboy: "This is easily the best rod holder I have used up in the boundary waters without actually mountain anything to my canoe."


And by best rod holder I mean the Tite-Lok ones.
 
mastertangler
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04/07/2017 07:39AM  
I suppose I should leave off on this subject for a while but an acquaintance of sorts who has been following the thread sent me this article. The author of the article is the "who's who" of walleye fishing and is a tournament angler and frequent contributor to various publications. The overall emphasis is on precision trolling which should be a thread in its own right but near the end of the article he talks about how many fish which swipe at lures and aren't hooked.

Which is what I should of been pointing out all along. How many of you guys which angle your rod out at 90 degrees are getting bites and not even realizing it because your set up isn't tight and the fish is merely striking, sensing something is amiss, and dropping the bait all before things get tight (i.e. before the flex or bend in the rod is sufficient to set hooks). I bet lots........

Now before I get a bunch of grief the question needs be asked........why should I care? Why put myself out there for the critics? Its the same reason when I see a kid in front of my house fishing in the canal that I go out and help. I want to see people have a good time and be successful.

Otherwise.......you might do some trolling, do it without precision and with a set up that is not tight (i.e, an improperly placed rod) and you might think trolling is boring because you don't catch anything.

I had preferred that my acquaintance (future friend) had put out the article himself and provided a bit of air cover for me (he agrees with my assessments) but I will take the liberty to post the article he has sent.......its actually quite informative, I don't think he will mind.


Precision trolling
 
Jackfish
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04/07/2017 08:34AM  
 
Lotw
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04/07/2017 08:42AM  
Well you know....if you say it enough times you will be right.
 
plexmidwest
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04/07/2017 10:39AM  
Every time I see these lengthy, several paragraph long responses, I just cringe. I am hoping for good information, and this is a great place for what I'm looking for, but I would rather get 10 single paragraph opinions from 10 different people instead of a couple of responses that are 10 paragraphs long. It happens frequently on the fishing and gear forums. Why is it necessary to comment as an 'expert' on every subject in those forums? There are some very knowledgeable members on this forum and I which ones are legit, and which ones just want to hear themselves talk about the costly gear they read about to keep their name on the top of the heap. Some folks are just too full of themselves.
 
Lotw
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04/07/2017 11:01AM  
Ram good
 
mastertangler
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04/07/2017 12:43PM  
Gee whiz.......there isn't one of you guys with enough moxy to counter these stone throwers? I put myself out there with lots of good info and these folks who bring nothing to the table other than to criticize (the tone, the length, personal attacks etc, just doesn't tickle our ears quite right) are given free reign with no pushback.

I am throwing pearls in the wrong place. Spending my time trying to really help some folks out when........surprise, surprise they could care less. And not only could they care less they come out snidely against. No intelligent discourse, no "thanks, I hadn't considered that", nothing but an unenlightened lack of appreciation of the knowledge of others and the time spent imparting it. Tsk, tsk, they do themselves and others a disservice.

Perhaps this is a better style for those present? > All methods of trolling are productive.....or....... Just use a Mepps spinner. Short and sweet and i'm not wasting my time. Beating a dead horse indeed!
 
BnD
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04/07/2017 02:06PM  
I think I have enough "moxy" at least I've never been told I'm "moxy" deficient. Easy lads, I think I just figured out the previously described precision trolling system. Follow me now, place the butt of the rod behind your left ankle with your leg slightly extended the place the rod in front of your right knee and resting on the gunwhale that will angle the rod up and back at 45 degrees and she'll be tight as a banjo string when you snag the bottom. Guaranteed. Been there done that. Come on MT I'm just joking, sort of, and I did previously post you provided useful info but, please let it go and move on.
 
mastertangler
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04/07/2017 05:45PM  
No hard feelings guys.......I guess I should ease off.......a bit to omni present and selfish of me to monopolize to the extent I do.

I have analyzed my malady, googled it actually, and it is called "Lackoffishingfrustration" and it appears I am venting in an unhealthy way. The cure, I am told, is to actually take a day off and go fishing thus relieving the pent up pressure and then no need to talk about fishing continually. Just one more month of work and then its 3 days in the glorious Keys (if the weather cooperates) which should restore balance to the force.

Anybody catching the UFC tomorrow night? Man oh man should be some fireworks!



 
QueticoMike
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04/08/2017 08:02AM  
I don't think trolling is boring because I don't catch fish. I always catch fish no matter how I am fishing. Sitting in a boat waiting and watching for the rod to bend is not much fun for me. I troll when I have to for either walleye or trout, but I don't fish for them very often. I would rather be casting for smallmouth. I don't think there is anything more exciting than a smallmouth topwater explosion. To each their own. My foot rod holder works just fine for me.
 
04/10/2017 11:11PM  
i use these on my old town ,(down east rod holder) not sure if they would work on every type of gunwale thou.
 
04/11/2017 05:57AM  
Thanks Shock. I was hoping this thread would make it's way off the first page of the forum and it would DIE.
 
rpike
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04/11/2017 10:35AM  
quote shock: "i use these on my old town ,(down east rod holder) not sure if they would work on every type of gunwale thou. "


I just bought a pair of these. I've used dual-clamp Down East rod holders on my fishing boat for years; they are bullet-proof. A friend used one of these D-10 models (single clamp) in my canoe a few years ago; it worked well.

I'm looking forward to not having to readjust a Rod Sentry after every single strike. Last year I used a Piscifun rod holder - no good for a canoe. The torque from trolling a lure or jet diver would about pull it off the gunwale. I used the under-my-leg method for years, but I need to shift my feet around more these days.

Mastertangler makes some good points about not wanting all the energy of a strike going into loading the rod. However, if what you are trolling (e.g. a jet diver) already has the rod loaded, having the rod at 90 degrees is just fine, especially with a stiffer rod and braid. Also, keep your drag adjusted so it slips a bit on the strike. If it's locked down tight, especially with braid, the hooks will pull out. Perhaps just as importantly, when your crankbait finds the bottom, you need something to give - much better the drag slips than the rod snaps!
 
mastertangler
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04/11/2017 01:57PM  
The Down east rod holders are really good and I run them off my stern (double clamp models) on my tin boat in Michigan. I have also used a single clamp model in canoe country but they have some serious drawbacks. First off.......they are very heavy as compared to other options. I would still lug one in as opposed to not having a rod holder but they are a bit of a bear and rather klunky as well taking up significant space.

Secondly they are quite loud. Pop a rod out and they make quite a bit of racket and not in keeping with a big part of the reason we go to the woods IMHO.

Indeed they are bullet proof and most of the serious dedicated Muskie trollers on Lake St Clair will have these on their boats but if you are in the market for a rod holder to take canoeing I think other options would be more suitable. Did I ever mention the Ram Rod 2000?

Actually I have an Attwood on my other canoe mounted on the deck and am considering getting another one so I can troll 2 offerings this summer at Isle Royale. Try to cover a bit more of the water column. It is a very nice rod holder as well but not as light and compact as the Ram Rod 2000.


Attwood
 
Savage Voyageur
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04/11/2017 03:53PM  
I just bought the Scotty rod holder with the thwart clamp. I will use it with a board if I'm in the bow and a clamp to the side of the canoe if I'm in the stern.
 
NotLight
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04/18/2017 05:17AM  
Here's my current version, from the Easter thread. Only right side up this time.



After some more use, I've decided to make the following modifications:

- Cup holder will move to the middle, where it won't bump my knees, and where it will get less splash. For me, it's all about the cup holder.
- I will go back to the Scotty rod holder, with mounts on either side. I like the Tite-loks better in a way, but it's quicker to adjust the angle on the Scotty, and easier to quick take off if you need "room".
- lower profile clamp bolts - maybe DIY, the Spring Creek clamps are nice, but the bolts and nuts are too big for this application.
- I'm going to use the spring woodworking clamp like I've seen in some of the other photos to attach the fish finder. That way, it's easier to take on and off and move around.
- I'll add a lot more very small eyelets with mini biners.
- I'll use ash this time, thinner, with a reinforcing rib in the middle. I found some ash pieces at Rockler, but haven't used them yet. I'll make it about an inch wider. 3" I think is the ash I got.
- 8 AA eneloop's has been working fine for me in the fishfinder. I'll switch to lithium someday when it's cheaper and more turnkey. I will switch from the pelican battery box to something lighter, cheaper, smaller, and more convenient, when I find something that satisfies all 4.

 
rdgbwca
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04/18/2017 12:48PM  
NotLight,

Can you link to more photos of this setup? Is there an original thread where you describe this? How do you attach the wood to your canoe? I am hesitant at this point to drill holes in my canoe.
 
NotLight
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04/18/2017 01:22PM  
quote rdgbwca: "NotLight,


Can you link to more photos of this setup? Is there an original thread where you describe this? How do you attach the wood to your canoe? I am hesitant at this point to drill holes in my canoe."


I think it's like the 5th or so entry in this old thread. Mostly ideas stolen from earlier threads - there are many.

 
rdgbwca
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04/18/2017 01:32PM  

I think it's like the 5th or so entry in this old thread. Mostly ideas stolen from earlier threads - there are many.
"


Thanks. I would like to hear about what you go with as a replacement for the clamps.
 
Mad_Angler
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06/08/2017 02:50PM  
A few more questions:

What about the front of the canoe? What mount would you use? Where/how would you mount it?

What about security? Have you ever had something break and lose a rod? Do you ever use security straps?
 
06/09/2017 07:15AM  
I would use a rail mount on the carrying thwart or you would have to drill something as previously posted. When trolling one person paddling is usually all that is needed and I have the bow person just hold their rod. Have never had a rod holder fail.
 
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