BWCA Check-in with home while on a trip? Boundary Waters Listening Point - General Discussion
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12/02/2021 08:15PM  
...being able to turn on my phone and check in and say hi to make sure everything is fine on the home front once or twice a day would be awesome...

How many trippers have this as a priority?

Is it just me? But while on a trip/vacation, isn't that the point... to get away from pressures at home? What happens if you check-in and everything is not fine? Would you paddle out and drive home?

For me, if I called my wife during a trip, she would think some disaster had happened. When I say, "see you next week Sunday", that's it until then for me.
 
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Savage Voyageur
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12/02/2021 08:28PM  
I was hiking away from camp this year and I turned on my phone to take a picture. To my surprise my emails and text messages came flooding in. A total surprise to me. I have a Garmin InReach unit that I keep in touch with my wife.
 
DRob1992
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12/02/2021 08:29PM  
Definitely a no for me. You nailed it - the whole allure of a BWCA trip is to get away from all pressure, technology, etc.
 
12/02/2021 08:35PM  
I do a 2 week solo each year and while I did these trips for 20 years without any communication, when I got married that changed. I use my inReach to send a message to my wife each day giving my location and to say everything is ok. It’s an easy way to give loved ones peace of mind that I’m ok.
 
Savage Voyageur
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12/02/2021 08:37PM  
DRob1992: "Definitely a no for me. You nailed it - the whole allure of a BWCA trip is to get away from all pressure, technology, etc."

Totally agree with you. I used to love checking out for a week. No work calling, no one can even reach me. But that has not worked out very good for me. Medical emergencies at home.
 
JWilder
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12/02/2021 08:45PM  
Never.
 
TipsyPaddler
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12/02/2021 08:45PM  
egknuti: "I use my inReach to send a message to my wife each day giving my location and to say everything is ok. It’s an easy way to give loved ones peace of mind that I’m ok. "

+1

And, yes, if I got a text that something was seriously wrong at home (life or limb lost or at risk type ‘wrong’…not the toilet is clogged again) and I was needed, I would cut short my trip. Family before fun, always.
 
dschult2
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12/02/2021 08:50PM  
I use an Inreach to check in my wife daily to let her know i'm o.k. But it's just a simple made it to camp, all good. Love you.
 
12/02/2021 09:03PM  
This summer I was solo hiking one of the BWCA trails. Stopped at an overlook for lunch and happened to check my Garmin inReach. Noticed I had multiple messages from my wife. Turns out she had torn her ACL and needed me to come home. I was back in the Twin Cities by 9pm.

I don't bring it because I NEED to be connected to work or the news or even my family. I bring it in case they need my help or I need theirs. It's peace of mind that allows me to go on trips (especially solo trips) without worrying.
 
12/03/2021 07:26AM  
geotramper: "This summer I was solo hiking one of the BWCA trails. Stopped at an overlook for lunch and happened to check my Garmin inReach. Noticed I had multiple messages from my wife. Turns out she had torn her ACL and needed me to come home. I was back in the Twin Cities by 9pm.


I don't bring it because I NEED to be connected to work or the news or even my family. I bring it in case they need my help or I need theirs. It's peace of mind that allows me to go on trips (especially solo trips) without worrying. "


This!
Especially since I'm older, and still like to solo.
My son, who works in the medical field, wants me to stop soloing, even though I have zero medical issues. Perhaps an InReach device will ease his mind.
 
Minnesotian
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12/03/2021 07:35AM  
mooseplums: "geotramper: "This summer I was solo hiking one of the BWCA trails. Stopped at an overlook for lunch and happened to check my Garmin inReach. Noticed I had multiple messages from my wife. Turns out she had torn her ACL and needed me to come home. I was back in the Twin Cities by 9pm.

I don't bring it because I NEED to be connected to work or the news or even my family. I bring it in case they need my help or I need theirs. It's peace of mind that allows me to go on trips (especially solo trips) without worrying. "

This!
Especially since I'm older, and still like to solo.
My son, who works in the medical field, wants me to stop soloing, even though I have zero medical issues. Perhaps an InReach device will ease his mind."

Yep, I agree about the peace of mind. My wife is used to me going on solo trips before the communication Spot or Inreach was a thing, and so there is an understanding to not rely on a daily communication because a device can break. But having some sort of check it really eases my mind and I can further enjoy my vacation knowing that if something emergency comes up, I can react to it.
 
dustytrail
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12/03/2021 08:33AM  
Like many above I have "adventured" all my life with a talk to you in x number of days. Not just BWCA but other more remote places as well. As I have gotten older and my family worries more. A few years back my wife convenced me to carry a cell phone just in case I am on the north 40 and get hurt with a chain saw or something. Three years back my son gifted me an in reach. I put it in the closet. Last summer I was convenced to take it on trips. I can send a premade message that also gives her my location and she can answer to let me know everything is okay. It gives my family peace of mind without introducing to much technology.
 
Porkeater
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12/03/2021 10:00AM  
As others have said, I like having my inReach for peace of mind, but do not use it for regular communication. I do send a couple "all is well" messages, more for the novelty of them rather than anyone expecting them. Certainly, if I received a message from home that something was seriously wrong, I would head home.
 
12/03/2021 10:05AM  
One winter, we got stuck on a lake full of slush at 0*. One of the trip members was not doing well and was too cold (hypothermic) to go on. We decided to set up camp and stay another night. One of our group members had a phone that was able to connect to the Rogers network in Canada and it was sure nice to be able to tell one of our significant others that we were not coming home and to also let our employers know that we would not be working the next day.

I generally appreciate not having a connection to anyone other than the people I am with while in the BWCA.
 
12/03/2021 10:45AM  
Bobber, I take my phone, but it's turned off, so not connected in that sense. Mostly I can't get reception "out there" anyway. I take it - along with my wallet - so it can't be stolen and used for 2 weeks without my knowledge. It does have some other uses too, but only if I turn it on, so not "connected" in airplane mode.

I am in that group of older (70) people with medical issues (heart attack). I now take a Garmin InReach mini, which replaced a PLB, but not to be "connected" to family/work/the world per se. The Garmin has an SOS function like the PLB, but allows 2-way text communication, which could be useful in an emergency. It also allows me to send an "I'm OK" message (or other message) to my wife and whomever else I choose. Only those people can contact me on it and they are instructed not to reply unless it's an emergency, so only "connected" in that sense. Yes, I do want to know if my wife, children, grandchildren, siblings, are seriously ill or have died, or some other emergency. They understand it might be days before I could exit and drive 1,200 miles home anyway.

The Garmin also provides weather reports and minimal GPS capability.

I think of it as a very useful - and possibly life-saving - tool that only connects me to things I want to be connected to.

 
Chicagored
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12/03/2021 11:40AM  
I did my first solo in 2010, at the age of 56, a year after surviving open heart surgery for congestive heart failure due to having been born with a defective heart valve. My wife was understandably not thrilled. Our compromise was for me to get an inreach explorer. This way, she can track that I'm moving when I'm supposed to be moving. I do send daily messages, but they are usually a pre-recorded "I'm doing fine" message. Or if I decide I'm going to park at a site for a few days, I let her know that I won't be moving. Its a peace of mind thing for her. The only people I share the contact info with is my wife and kids. Like Boonie, I would want to be informed if a significant problem arose.

About 15 years ago, my brother and I were in the BW. When we got back to Ely, we turned on our phones to find numerous messages from our other brother that our father was dying. Luckily, we were able to get to visit him a day and a half before he passed, but with a communication method, we could have been there 4 days earlier when he was still able to talk. I wish I could have returned sooner, and if I had had an inreach then, I could have been.
 
LostInREI
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12/03/2021 12:13PM  
I'm always amazed how many people can just cut off contact with their family. Maybe it's because I've only been married 5 years and have a young daughter, but I love my family and like hearing from them when I'm gone. I go to BWCA to get away from the hustle of city life and the pressures of work, not to avoid my family. If I could FaceTime with them once a day for 5-10 minutes I would happily do so and have no shame "ruining" the wilderness experience. At the end of the day they are my life and that few minutes connecting with them is important to me.

I would bring them, but my wife's idea of camping is when we spend the weekend at a family member's house out of town. She would not enjoy a trip into the BWCA, and there 100% no way she'd be away from our toddler daughter for more than a few hours so here we are.
 
PeaceFrog
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12/03/2021 12:18PM  
boonie: "Bobber, I take my phone, but it's turned off, so not connected in that sense. Mostly I can't get reception "out there" anyway. I take it - along with my wallet - so it can't be stolen and used for 2 weeks without my knowledge. It does have some other uses too, but only if I turn it on, so not "connected" in airplane mode.


I am in that group of older (70) people with medical issues (heart attack). I now take a Garmin InReach mini, which replaced a PLB, but not to be "connected" to family/work/the world per se. The Garmin has an SOS function like the PLB, but allows 2-way text communication, which could be useful in an emergency. It also allows me to send an "I'm OK" message (or other message) to my wife and whomever else I choose. Only those people can contact me on it and they are instructed not to reply unless it's an emergency, so only "connected" in that sense. Yes, I do want to know if my wife, children, grandchildren, siblings, are seriously ill or have died, or some other emergency. They understand it might be days before I could exit and drive 1,200 miles home anyway.


The Garmin also provides weather reports and minimal GPS capability.


I think of it as a very useful - and possibly life-saving - tool that only connects me to things I want to be connected to.


"


Boonie - I can appreciate your insight on this and the unit you carry. I have mixed emotions on this and could go either way honestly. My 2022 trip I am really wanting to completely disconnect for personal reflection. However, one event always makes me lean the other way like Boonie. I was in the BWCA when 9/11 happened. Our group did not find out until 9/13 and that was only because we passed a husband and wife on a portage and they could tell we had been in for a while. Talk about shock and an abrupt end to a trip. Never paddled so hard in my life and when we hit the parking lot it was unanimous to drive straight back to Ohio. Couldn't get home fast enough to my wife and daughter. I will likely invest in a Garmin after 2022 - this trip I need clarity.
 
DRob1992
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12/03/2021 01:29PM  
LostInREI: "I'm always amazed how many people can just cut off contact with their family. Maybe it's because I've only been married 5 years and have a young daughter, but I love my family and like hearing from them when I'm gone. I go to BWCA to get away from the hustle of city life and the pressures of work, not to avoid my family. If I could FaceTime with them once a day for 5-10 minutes I would happily do so and have no shame "ruining" the wilderness experience. At the end of the day they are my life and that few minutes connecting with them is important to me.

I would bring them, but my wife's idea of camping is when we spend the weekend at a family member's house out of town. She would not enjoy a trip into the BWCA, and there 100% no way she'd be away from our toddler daughter for more than a few hours so here we are."


I'm newly married and my BWCA technology stance is the opposite of yours. I respect your stance entirely. I respect your love for your family. I love my wife more than I love anyone or anything else on this planet. She fully understands the potential implications and the magnitude of a remote camping trip. We've set up contingency plans and emergency contacts for her in case there is an accident while I'm gone. Nobody wants a death, disaster, etc. to happen while away on his/her trip. My peace of mind comes from planning with my wife and knowing full well that she is in good hands if such an unfortunate incident were to occur while I was gone.
 
TuscaroraBorealis
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12/03/2021 02:38PM  
I believe silence can be/is sacred.

Great topic!
I also love my family & friends. God forbid some tragic scenario plays out while I'm on a trip. Certainly there are things I would do differently if I actually knew about them. I think everyone draws their line in the sand at a different spot and, I completely understand and respect their right to do so.

But, for this particular question, a line from an old movie (Clear & present danger???) comes to my mind. "There's no point in trying to diffuse a bomb that's already went off." If someone at home gets hurt etc while in the midst of a trip, what am I realistically going to be able to do about it anyways??? I think the dread of checking would definitely be detrimental & defeat one of the primary purposes for getting away in the first place.

Please understand, this doesn't mean I don't care about those I'm leaving behind. But, to me trying to constantly micro manage everything also seems pointless. Often times (canoe trip or no) life happens when I am least expecting or prepared for it.I believe all things happen for a good, though not always immediately understandable, reason. The ultimate lesson is that I am never in control.

This point of view also witnesses to a spiritual principal that guides my life & I try to live up to. "Jesus I trust in You!" Regardless of what may happen I know He has my back and (as He always has and, is ALWAYS with me & them) can bring good from every circumstance - if I only cooperate with His grace. Essentially, I try to live this life understanding that I'm only passing through. So, I'm comfortable with my decision to be out of contact for extended periods of time.

If there was some concern that I felt/feel would absolutely need my attention or, if people truely need to hear from me while on a trip. I simply wouldn't go. But, to reiterate, that's just me. I guess there's just so much to say about this - from several legitimate perspectives, that it's difficult to encapsulate it all here. I guess I could've just answered "no" and left it at that???? :)
 
12/03/2021 02:59PM  
PeaceFrog: "boonie: "Bobber, I take my phone, but it's turned off, so not connected in that sense. Mostly I can't get reception "out there" anyway. I take it - along with my wallet - so it can't be stolen and used for 2 weeks without my knowledge. It does have some other uses too, but only if I turn it on, so not "connected" in airplane mode.



I am in that group of older (70) people with medical issues (heart attack). I now take a Garmin InReach mini, which replaced a PLB, but not to be "connected" to family/work/the world per se. The Garmin has an SOS function like the PLB, but allows 2-way text communication, which could be useful in an emergency. It also allows me to send an "I'm OK" message (or other message) to my wife and whomever else I choose. Only those people can contact me on it and they are instructed not to reply unless it's an emergency, so only "connected" in that sense. Yes, I do want to know if my wife, children, grandchildren, siblings, are seriously ill or have died, or some other emergency. They understand it might be days before I could exit and drive 1,200 miles home anyway.



The Garmin also provides weather reports and minimal GPS capability.



I think of it as a very useful - and possibly life-saving - tool that only connects me to things I want to be connected to.



"



Boonie - I can appreciate your insight on this and the unit you carry. I have mixed emotions on this and could go either way honestly. My 2022 trip I am really wanting to completely disconnect for personal reflection. However, one event always makes me lean the other way like Boonie. I was in the BWCA when 9/11 happened. Our group did not find out until 9/13 and that was only because we passed a husband and wife on a portage and they could tell we had been in for a while. Talk about shock and an abrupt end to a trip. Never paddled so hard in my life and when we hit the parking lot it was unanimous to drive straight back to Ohio. Couldn't get home fast enough to my wife and daughter. I will likely invest in a Garmin after 2022 - this trip I need clarity."


Just FYI,

The only people who can contact you on InReach are people you enter as contacts, so if you don't enter any contacts, you won't get any. Of course you won't be able to contact them either, but you still have SOS, weather, etc. My contacts have been told not to reply except as noted above and they haven't.

Just a thought for you.
 
12/03/2021 03:41PM  
We've rented an inReach for our last 3 or 4 10-day trips. My 90-year-old mother is in an assisted living facility and has dementia, and I would feel very irresponsible if I could not be reached should she have an emergency. Our daughter has graciously agreed each year to be our "filter" for contact. I don't want news of the world or to play the daily sudoku, but I do want to be able to confirm daily that I can continue my trip as planned.

TZ
 
12/03/2021 04:26PM  
egknuti: "I do a 2 week solo each year and while I did these trips for 20 years without any communication, when I got married that changed. I use my inReach to send a message to my wife each day giving my location and to say everything is ok. It’s an easy way to give loved ones peace of mind that I’m ok. " Exactly Why wouldn't you send message to your significant other if you have the ability to keep their mind at ease. You're not having a conversation, just a quick preset message saying you're ok. You're still away from it all
 
DRob1992
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12/03/2021 04:46PM  
Blatz: "egknuti: "I do a 2 week solo each year and while I did these trips for 20 years without any communication, when I got married that changed. I use my inReach to send a message to my wife each day giving my location and to say everything is ok. It’s an easy way to give loved ones peace of mind that I’m ok. " Exactly Why wouldn't you send message to your significant other if you have the ability to keep their mind at ease. You're not having a conversation, just a quick preset message saying you're ok. You're still away from it all"

I think many people's loved ones understand that no news is good news. To each his/her own. Very fascinating topic to discuss.
 
12/03/2021 04:57PM  
I guess it’s whatever your ok with. For me I’ve been one to just disconnect. Although on my forty day trip I did have people call someone just to let them know I was ok once in a while. Never did a family member once question my thinking or ability. Although I learned you don’t tell people like your mother things that may have been sketchy out there.
The good news is we can all do what is comfortable for us. For a number though... I think that takes away a little of the adventure...
 
moosedoggie
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12/03/2021 05:49PM  
As many have said, to each their own.

I carry an Inreach mini and my wife is the only contact. Her back will no longer let her paddle so I set the tracking function up and she follows me on the computer. She enjoys looking at my trip and living vicariously.

The only messages I send are when I shut it down at the end of the day letting her know things are fine. The Inreach was her idea, sort of a demand, after I had a near miss on a solo backpacking trip. It is cheap insurance.
 
12/03/2021 05:53PM  
LostInREI: "I'm always amazed how many people can just cut off contact with their family. Maybe it's because I've only been married 5 years and have a young daughter, but I love my family and like hearing from them when I'm gone. I go to BWCA to get away from the hustle of city life and the pressures of work, not to avoid my family. If I could FaceTime with them once a day for 5-10 minutes I would happily do so and have no shame "ruining" the wilderness experience. At the end of the day they are my life and that few minutes connecting with them is important to me.

I would bring them, but my wife's idea of camping is when we spend the weekend at a family member's house out of town. She would not enjoy a trip into the BWCA, and there 100% no way she'd be away from our toddler daughter for more than a few hours so here we are."


I think, to you, my husband and I would have been quite "amazing". Of course, it was another time, and when we took the majority of our trips (1971-2013) there was no way to contact the "outside world" once you were in the BWCA or Quetico. It was just a given that "we will call you when we get off the water at the end of our trip." We left our children with dear friends in Minneapolis whom we trusted completely, and those friends had medical permission, as well as contact information for grandparents. That was it. Our children had every confidence that we would return. We started this procedure when they were toddlers, and continued it until they were adults. Only one time did they want to go with us, and we really did feel that the time for "just the two of us" was precious, too.

After a trip (usually in most cases 6-12 days) we would first call the home where our children were staying, then call each set of parents. Both of our mothers were worrying every day, our friends from Minneapolis (who knew all kinds of BWCA trippers)--not so much. By "call them", I mean we had to travel to Ely or Grand Marais and find a pay phone. It was a time when people didn't keep in close contact by phone every day, let alone every hour as people do now, and it was much simpler. "We'll let you know when we get a chance" was just fine with everyone.

We had a SPOT on our last couple of trips and one time we did take a SAT phone. Frankly, I found both of them sort of a PITA, and if we hadn't had some rather daunting health issues we probably woudn't have taken them. The time we took the SAT phone we didn't tell anyone in the family that we had it--it was strictly for emergency. Never used it.

We love our family, too. They were, and are, very important to us. But a change of scenery without them didn't seem that terrible to me (I was a full-time Mom), and we combined a few days of family vacation with the kids with our trip to the canoe country (we didn't live in Minnesota), so it was all a fun time. I never felt that our canoe trips were to "avoid" the family, just a way to broaden horizons all the way around. No regrets here.



 
TuscaroraBorealis
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12/03/2021 07:36PM  
...yet another eloquently stated post from Spartan2.
 
JWilder
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12/03/2021 08:55PM  
TuscaroraBorealis: "...yet another eloquently stated post from Spartan2."
+100
 
straighthairedcurly
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12/03/2021 10:12PM  
Well said, Spartan2. I also started tripping when contact with home was impossible. When we had emergencies on a trip (injured camper or similar), we had to paddle to an outfitter or similar business and use a landline phone. Even then we had to leave a message saying when and where to call us back because camp didn't have a phone in the main camp.

When I started traveling solo, I felt no need to be in contact the outside world, but to create peace of mind for my husband I carry a basic SPOT. I send an "I'm Ok" each night when I stop to camp. But I have no desire to be texting messages back/forth. My solo is my alone time. Doesn't mean I don't love my family, I just like my independence ;)
 
billconner
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12/04/2021 06:31AM  
I remember when a long distance call home during a week long business trip was an expensive deal and a luxury. Rarely communicated with my wife during a work day. Now not uncommon to talk often and be in near constant communication by text. Weird.
 
yellowcanoe
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12/04/2021 07:28AM  
It happened. My sister in law died while we were out in the Alaska wilderness. We had no idea. We missed the funeral. Now we are the family black sheep.

An inreach could have prevented this. Disconnecting can have consequences but everyone is different. We do live in the woods and see no one but four footed animals! Its always quiet here.
 
PeaceFrog
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12/04/2021 09:21AM  
billconner: "I remember when a long distance call home during a week long business trip was an expensive deal and a luxury. Rarely communicated with my wife during a work day. Now not uncommon to talk often and be in near constant communication by text. Weird."

No doubt. We have all but forgotten of the long distance call. From a land line even! So primitive
 
PeaceFrog
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12/04/2021 09:23AM  
boonie: "PeaceFrog: "boonie: "Bobber, I take my phone, but it's turned off, so not connected in that sense. Mostly I can't get reception "out there" anyway. I take it - along with my wallet - so it can't be stolen and used for 2 weeks without my knowledge. It does have some other uses too, but only if I turn it on, so not "connected" in airplane mode.



I am in that group of older (70) people with medical issues (heart attack). I now take a Garmin InReach mini, which replaced a PLB, but not to be "connected" to family/work/the world per se. The Garmin has an SOS function like the PLB, but allows 2-way text communication, which could be useful in an emergency. It also allows me to send an "I'm OK" message (or other message) to my wife and whomever else I choose. Only those people can contact me on it and they are instructed not to reply unless it's an emergency, so only "connected" in that sense. Yes, I do want to know if my wife, children, grandchildren, siblings, are seriously ill or have died, or some other emergency. They understand it might be days before I could exit and drive 1,200 miles home anyway.



The Garmin also provides weather reports and minimal GPS capability.



I think of it as a very useful - and possibly life-saving - tool that only connects me to things I want to be connected to.



"




Boonie - I can appreciate your insight on this and the unit you carry. I have mixed emotions on this and could go either way honestly. My 2022 trip I am really wanting to completely disconnect for personal reflection. However, one event always makes me lean the other way like Boonie. I was in the BWCA when 9/11 happened. Our group did not find out until 9/13 and that was only because we passed a husband and wife on a portage and they could tell we had been in for a while. Talk about shock and an abrupt end to a trip. Never paddled so hard in my life and when we hit the parking lot it was unanimous to drive straight back to Ohio. Couldn't get home fast enough to my wife and daughter. I will likely invest in a Garmin after 2022 - this trip I need clarity."



Just FYI,


The only people who can contact you on InReach are people you enter as contacts, so if you don't enter any contacts, you won't get any. Of course you won't be able to contact them either, but you still have SOS, weather, etc. My contacts have been told not to reply except as noted above and they haven't.


Just a thought for you. "


Good to know. Thanks Boonie
 
EddyTurn
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12/04/2021 11:25AM  
boonie: "The only people who can contact you on InReach are people you enter as contacts, so if you don't enter any contacts, you won't get any. Of course you won't be able to contact them either, but you still have SOS, weather, etc. My contacts have been told not to reply except as noted above and they haven't.


Just a thought for you. "

Interestingly, it's not at all how my InReach operates (it's not the latest model, I got it may be 4 years ago). My Inreach allows me to send a message through SMS or email to any phone number or email address. Of course having people on the contact list makes the process easier, but this list is not required. And anyone who received my message can reply back (while no one else can do it through email or SMS). The only exception is other InReach subscribers: everyone who knows my InReach number can send me a message through their inReach.
 
yellowcanoe
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12/04/2021 11:45AM  
PeaceFrog: "billconner: "I remember when a long distance call home during a week long business trip was an expensive deal and a luxury. Rarely communicated with my wife during a work day. Now not uncommon to talk often and be in near constant communication by text. Weird."


No doubt. We have all but forgotten of the long distance call. From a land line even! So primitive "


We all have landlines! No cell at home! Living under a mountain does that even though its not much of a mountain only 2000 feet high.

Then again until 1983 we still had an operator assisted crank telephone system.
 
12/04/2021 01:44PM  
We have a land line at our home because of poor cellular service in our area. Have a a land line at our lake cottage for the same reason. Everyone, believe it or not, doesn’t live where it is practical to dump the land line.

We do not, however, pay for long-distance calls one at a time, Just a one month charge that covers all calling.

I remember operator assisted crank phones, but they were a long time ago when I was a small child, in the early 50’s. Our phone number was #3. (Small town, but it wasn’t a party line.)
 
Duff
distinguished member (109)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/04/2021 02:13PM  
Yep, usually camping within cell range. Solo fall and winter tripper.
Just a quick text at the end of the day..... "Survived day 3."
And I usually check weather radar a couple of times a day to plan things around possible precipitation.
Otherwise it's in airplane mode, it's my main camera because it takes great pics. Not a chance I'm checking work emails while up there.
Although I did post a selfie to Facebook this past Oct a week after my father passed, to let folks know I was at peace with things and at a location where there was no better place to soothe my soul.
 
mschi772
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12/04/2021 10:29PM  
I have a Somewear satellite messenger for safety. I send check-ins to certain people, but I make sure everyone involved understands that it is only for that, weather checks, SOS signal should we ever need it, or for someone to reach us regarding a tremendous emergency that they feel we MUST know about immediately despite being in the wilderness where we couldn't do anything about most things for a matter of days of we wanted to. People who can't be without phones and repeated communication outside of the trip don't get invited on any more trips.
 
PineKnot
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12/05/2021 06:49AM  
There seems to be one good reason to “unplug” while on a canoe trip - to get away from the stresses of home. On the other hand, there are a myriad of reasons to keep in touch during a trip….and that for me takes priority over not having communication with home. I have pulled out early once in the past 20 years…and I needed to be home….
 
Bearpath9
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12/05/2021 07:22AM  
Not really a priority to check in home to see what is going on for me. And, odd as it may seem to others, I didn't own a cell phone until this last summer. We have a land line, so that is how you get a hold of me.

Then the wife told me(in no uncertain terms)that I would be carrying a cell phone if I was going solo. I could see her point, so I reluctantly got one.

Well, it worked, I was able to call her once a day and reassure her that I was alive. Except for the last day, when the battery gave out, due to my ignorance with these devices.

Now it has sat on a shelf in my closet since August, and won't be touched again until this summer.

In case you haven't noticed, I don't like cellphones. And the thought of taking one to a place I go to get away from everything just seems ridiculous.

But that's just me. I'm fine with whatever anyone else does in this regard.
 
PeaceFrog
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12/05/2021 08:37AM  
Really enjoyed reading everyone’s perspective on this one. The beauty of it is we have a choice and there isn’t a wrong choice. It’s up to the individual and the trip you are on. I won’t take anything in 2022 but my next trip could be different depending on life at that time.
 
12/05/2021 10:20AM  
Bearpath9: "... Except for the last day, when the battery gave out, due to my ignorance with these devices.... "

So then your wife was worried because "you didn't call"??

My wife would be worried if I did call her... "What's wrong?"
 
HowardSprague
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12/05/2021 06:05PM  
It’s understood I will call when I’m outta the woods. Now & then I’ll turn on my phone for a photo, might see a bar or two and sometimes send a text.

On a related note, it’s a pleasure to tell the job you’ll be off the grid with no way to be reached. I have a friend who had a job at a hotel and was given a hard time for this by his bosses who clearly didn’t get it.
 
billconner
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12/05/2021 06:30PM  
I imagine I'll live to see cell service courtesy of satellites everywhere - on earth and probably beyond. I guess that suggests don't buy stock in Garmin et al. :)

 
OCDave
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12/05/2021 08:15PM  
If I have phone service feel I haven't gone far enough.

 
Bearpath9
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12/06/2021 07:29AM  
bobbernumber3: "Bearpath9: "... Except for the last day, when the battery gave out, due to my ignorance with these devices.... "
So then your wife was worried because "you didn't call"??

My wife would be worried if I did call her... "What's wrong?""

No, because her brother and his wife live in Ely. I just went to his place and imposed on him.
 
LostInREI
member (21)member
 
12/06/2021 08:30AM  
I do appreciate the perspective of everyone here. This is a much more tolerant group than the BWCA Facebook group. You'd think someone had committed a war crime if they want to connect with family while in the wilderness or post a picture to facebook!

I completely understand the urge to unplug completely. I think once my kid is a little bit older, I won't have as much of a problem. She is at an age where she is exploring everything, trying to escape from captivity in our home at night time, and just in general a little tyrant. I know I can't do much from the BWCA but when we mistakenly discovered that we had 1 bar of service last summer standing on a rock on the east side of site 1889 on Gull, it relieved a lot of stress for me to know my wife could reach me if necessary and vice versa. I also enjoyed getting to say good night to my little one each night.
 
Portage99
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12/06/2021 02:27PM  
OCDave: "If I have phone service feel I haven't gone far enough. "
Me too. I never check-in.
 
12/09/2021 03:09PM  
No Thank You.
 
billconner
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12/09/2021 06:52PM  
We just celebrated our 47th wedding anniversary. My wife doesn't like not hearing from me everyday. Simple enough to take a few moments to check in.

 
12/10/2021 07:38AM  
Congrats on your anniversary, billconner. We will celebrate our 54th anniversary on the 17th. Doesn’t it seem like “only yesterday, and yet forever?”
 
billconner
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12/10/2021 05:30PM  
Thank you Spartan and congrats to you! Many things from long ago seem like they just happened.
 
12/10/2021 07:21PM  
Happy anniversary Spartans...

I’m glad for technology, I’m not against checking in. It might also give any kind of responders important information. I was always good without it. But hearing people’s thoughts, many good points were brought up. Especially if it allows you to be able to go in the first place.
 
TuscaroraBorealis
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12/10/2021 08:29PM  
....also, another one of the reasons I choose not to is something that happened on the one trip we did have a device along. It wound up failing (at least everything but, the emergency button) several days before our trip ended. We were fine but, having people at home expecting a nightly "check in" that never came wore on us (and obviously them) as we finished up. Kind of soured me on doing that again.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY billconnor & Spartans!!!

 
12/10/2021 09:19PM  
EddyTurn: "boonie: "The only people who can contact you on InReach are people you enter as contacts, so if you don't enter any contacts, you won't get any. Of course you won't be able to contact them either, but you still have SOS, weather, etc. My contacts have been told not to reply except as noted above and they haven't.



Just a thought for you. "

. . . And anyone who received my message can reply back (while no one else can do it through email or SMS). "


This is the point I was trying to get across - it's not your regular email or phone number. They can't just send you a message or text if you don't send them one.
 
12/12/2021 10:02AM  
I trip with my wife and two children…I am 51 years old. Working in health care I’ve seen too many people my age that look healthy but have a heart attack all of a sudden.

I am not worried so much about me…it is what it is…but I would not want my family saddled with no way to get help so I have an inreach for peace of mind. I also add a few family members and they follow along on our trips. They get a lot of enjoyment from that and adds to the fun.

I was on Basswood once and used my iPhone to take a picture when all of my work emails started uploading…I immediately put it away and ignored them :) Nothing I can do while on the trip, why have the worries. I can deal with it later when I have a chance to actually do something.

T
 
billconner
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12/12/2021 06:45PM  
boonie: "
This is the point I was trying to get across - it's not your regular email or phone number. They can't just send you a message or text if you don't send them one. "


Or until a "friend" forwards one of your messages with your contact to everyone in the office........
 
12/12/2021 07:10PM  
billconner: "boonie: "
This is the point I was trying to get across - it's not your regular email or phone number. They can't just send you a message or text if you don't send them one. "



Or until a "friend" forwards one of your messages with your contact to everyone in the office........"


Number one…if a friend did that they aren’t a friend :) I’m pretty selective and choosy on that one…I am guessing others are too.

Number two, that’s not how I understand the technology works. Only people you have allowed or activated in your Garmin account can message you.

“ The number that the message comes from can also change from recipient to recipient. These numbers should not be shared with others as a way to reach the inReach user, and messages sent directly to these numbers will not be delivered”

T
 
12/12/2021 11:04PM  
timatkn: "billconner: "boonie: "
This is the point I was trying to get across - it's not your regular email or phone number. They can't just send you a message or text if you don't send them one. "




Or until a "friend" forwards one of your messages with your contact to everyone in the office........"



Number one…if a friend did that they aren’t a friend :) I’m pretty selective and choosy on that one…I am guessing others are too.


Number two, that’s not how I understand the technology works. Only people you have allowed or activated in your Garmin account can message you.


“ The number that the message comes from can also change from recipient to recipient. These numbers should not be shared with others as a way to reach the inReach user, and messages sent directly to these numbers will not be delivered”


T"


Yes, only my family knows, and being retired, that's my office. :)

I can't say for sure, but as T said, I don't think it works that way. I have no idea about other devices. Does it work that way with "Spot"?

At any rate, if you just want an emergency SOS, don't set up anyone as a contact and don't send anyone a message. You'd just have a lower power PLB, but I think you'd still have 2-way contact with the emergency responders, which could be beneficial. I'm certainly no expert on the technology. Garmin would probably be the best source of information on it if anyone really wants to know.
 
billconner
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12/13/2021 05:27AM  
Maybe some or all of the communicators don't include email addresses in forwarded messages. I'm in between upgrading to a 2-way device from my Spot 2 and waiting for Spacelink to provide phone service everywhere.
 
12/13/2021 06:27AM  
Which one are you upgrading to Bill? I know there are differences among them, but not clear which do what or how. I think Garmin and Zoleo are different in their use of satellite and/or cellular service . . . ?
 
eagle98mn
distinguished member (121)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/13/2021 10:55AM  
I always bring my phone in airplane mode so that I can take pictures. I also use MapMyRun to track my travels each day. The GPS on the phone works fine in the app to do this, and I enjoy revisiting my route details after I am home.

A couple years ago, I climbed Thunder Point while camping on SAK. The guy I was with had his phone go off as we climbed, which reminded me that people have reported reception there. Out of curiosity, I flipped my airplane mode off and had full LTE service. I facetimed my wife and kids. After their initial concern was eliminated (why are you calling, are you ok??), it was kind of fun to have a mid-trip check-in. I was also able to show off the view to the kids to get them further excited for their trips up with me.

This past summer, I was having issues with my water filter on Clear Lake near Ely. After turning airplane mode off, I was able to download the instruction manual and remind myself of all the troubleshooting tips. If it hadn't worked, I was prepared to boil water or dip from the middle of the lake. Still, I was able to reinforce my knowledge and restore some of the water flow.

These isolated incidents of cell usage have been positive even though I generally prefer to be out of contact. If anything, it has reassured me that as cell coverage inevitably expands, it is really how I choose to use it that will impact my trips. I can see myself arriving at a spot where I turn it on each evening for a quick check-in. It certainly would give me more peace of mind travelling with kids in case a disaster struck the adults to know the kids could call for help.
 
ScottL
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12/13/2021 02:36PM  
I look at my trips to the boundary waters, or other wilderness locations, as a chance to step away from the constant barrage of calls, texts, emails that I get when I'm "on the grid." I bring my cell phone on my trips, but only because it is a nice size camera for quick shots during the day, since it zips nicely into my shirt pocket. I keep it on airplane mode to conserve power and I can confirm that I've paddle far enough "off the grid" when I see that there is no reception on the phone.

I started my wilderness tripping in Alaska where I didn't even own a cell phone for my first 8 years in that state. We always let a responsible person know when we were heading into the wilderness, a general idea of where we were going, and the day we expected to be off the trail. But people would know that sometimes weather could cause unexpected delays, so the general instruction was not to contact the troopers unless we were over 24 hours late in getting off the trail.

Perhaps at some point I will consider using something like the InReach device, particularly if my health becomes an issue or my spouse wants that extra layer of security. But I think that using such technology can have its downsides because you can become a little more complacent, knowing that help is just a red button away. When you're completely on your own in the wilderness I find that my senses become more keen and when I know that I have to rely on myself or my trip mates if things go south I pay closer attention to what I'm doing.

The decision on whether to bring/use technology is definitely a personal decision and if it helps some to trip longer into their golden years, or if it helps some to make a transition to taking a solo trip, then I guess that is a good thing.

Scott
 
MReid
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12/13/2021 04:22PM  
ScottL: " But I think that using such technology can have its downsides because you can become a little more complacent, knowing that help is just a red button away. When you're completely on your own in the wilderness I find that my senses become more keen and when I know that I have to rely on myself or my trip mates if things go south I pay closer attention to what I'm doing.
Scott"

It certainly doesn't have to. I've done a lot of solo stuff (climbing, backpacking, backcountry skiing, canoeing) since the 1970s, when post cards and collect calls from public phones were the only option. Having an inReach now has no effect on what I do, however it does make be feel better knowing that I'm a little bit more responsible towards my daughter (who rightfully worries about me) and anyone who may have to come get me. I put it in my pack and forget about it.
 
billconner
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12/13/2021 06:19PM  
boonie: "Which one are you upgrading to Bill? I know there are differences among them, but not clear which do what or how. I think Garmin and Zoleo are different in their use of satellite and/or cellular service . . . ?"

No specific choice yet. Back in May I did a spreadsheet comparison but like all tech, probably out of of date. It's in middle of this thread: Thread 'My Review of the Zoleo 2-way Satellite Messenger' thread

I'm sure as soon as I buy SpaceX will make my cell phone work everywhere. :(
 
RunningFox
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12/13/2021 06:55PM  
Another expensive electronic device, no doubt made in China . . . With a poorly written instruction manual that must be read and memorized. . . And a warranty “card” to register on a hard to navigate website with special offers for added distraction? …And subscription fees to be paid thru perpetuity? How can I, or any canoeist, possibly resist this temptation?

Not “speaking” with loved ones daily — just to “check-in”? What would mother say? She would worry, and so I suppose I should too. No doubt Jesus would take one on his wilderness trip if China was making these little miracles back then. He too had a mother.

And then there’s my personal safety - what if? Never mind I take greater risks in my daily driving. So, what if? I wasn’t meant to die. I can never be too safe or secure — ya know?

Where is Calvin Rutstrum when we need him (to further explain this new way of the “wilderness”)?

 
sedges
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12/13/2021 10:46PM  
Kind of old-fashioned, but I send my sweetheart(if she is not with me on the trip) letters from the wilderness. My trips are minimum ten days, so they have time to get there before i exit. I send one at the start of the second day, handing it off to someone going out the way I came in. Its just to let her know I'm feeling good on the first portages. i'm kind of old, so it reassures her that I'm likely to make it through the trip. Then I'll pass one off to someone on the middle day of the trip. It usually gets there a couple of days before I get out. If I am in a busy area, I might send more.

People are always happy to drop it in the mail on their way home, or at the office of an outfitter if they will be passing through one. I put the letter in a zip lock before handing it off. I've been sending letters from the wilderness since my first trip in 1968 and have never had one fail to arrive.
 
Porkeater
distinguished member (192)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/14/2021 07:48AM  
RunningFox: "Another expensive electronic device, no doubt made in China . . . With a poorly written instruction manual that must be read and memorized. . . And a warranty “card” to register on a hard to navigate website with special offers for added distraction? …And subscription fees to be paid thru perpetuity? How can I, or any canoeist, possibly resist this temptation?


Not “speaking” with loved ones daily — just to “check-in”? What would mother say? She would worry, and so I suppose I should too. No doubt Jesus would take one on his wilderness trip if China was making these little miracles back then. He too had a mother.


And then there’s my personal safety - what if? Never mind I take greater risks in my daily driving. So, what if? I wasn’t meant to die. I can never be too safe or secure — ya know?


Where is Calvin Rutstrum when we need him (to further explain this new way of the “wilderness”)?


"


So nice of you to share your condescension. Sorry that many of us don't live up to your standards. What a fun place this is!
 
12/14/2021 08:03AM  
Porkeater: "RunningFox: "Another expensive electronic device, no doubt made in China . . . With a poorly written instruction manual that must be read and memorized. . . And a warranty “card” to register on a hard to navigate website with special offers for added distraction? …And subscription fees to be paid thru perpetuity? How can I, or any canoeist, possibly resist this temptation?



Not “speaking” with loved ones daily — just to “check-in”? What would mother say? She would worry, and so I suppose I should too. No doubt Jesus would take one on his wilderness trip if China was making these little miracles back then. He too had a mother.



And then there’s my personal safety - what if? Never mind I take greater risks in my daily driving. So, what if? I wasn’t meant to die. I can never be too safe or secure — ya know?



Where is Calvin Rutstrum when we need him (to further explain this new way of the “wilderness”)?



"



So nice of you to share your condescension. Sorry that many of us don't live up to your standards. What a fun place this is!"


You must have understood his post? I had no idea what he was saying.
 
Porkeater
distinguished member (192)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/14/2021 08:07AM  
bobbernumber3: "Porkeater: "

"




So nice of you to share your condescension. Sorry that many of us don't live up to your standards. What a fun place this is!"



You must have understood his post? I had no idea what he was saying."

It's clear; I don't share in his views and therefore am not worthy to share his wilderness. Mea maxima culpa.

EDIT: Apparently I messed up trying to quote the portion to which I was replying. Sorry.
 
ScottL
senior member (58)senior membersenior member
 
12/14/2021 09:06AM  
sedges: "Kind of old-fashioned, but I send my sweetheart(if she is not with me on the trip) letters from the wilderness. My trips are minimum ten days, so they have time to get there before i exit. I send one at the start of the second day, handing it off to someone going out the way I came in. Its just to let her know I'm feeling good on the first portages. i'm kind of old, so it reassures her that I'm likely to make it through the trip. Then I'll pass one off to someone on the middle day of the trip. It usually gets there a couple of days before I get out. If I am in a busy area, I might send more.


People are always happy to drop it in the mail on their way home, or at the office of an outfitter if they will be passing through one. I put the letter in a zip lock before handing it off. I've been sending letters from the wilderness since my first trip in 1968 and have never had one fail to arrive. "


I like this idea. Letter writing is, unfortunately, a dying art and it is a neat way to include a loved one in on the experience of your trip.
 
Minnesotian
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12/14/2021 10:24AM  
ScottL: "sedges: "Kind of old-fashioned, but I send my sweetheart(if she is not with me on the trip) letters from the wilderness. My trips are minimum ten days, so they have time to get there before i exit. I send one at the start of the second day, handing it off to someone going out the way I came in. Its just to let her know I'm feeling good on the first portages. i'm kind of old, so it reassures her that I'm likely to make it through the trip. Then I'll pass one off to someone on the middle day of the trip. It usually gets there a couple of days before I get out. If I am in a busy area, I might send more.



People are always happy to drop it in the mail on their way home, or at the office of an outfitter if they will be passing through one. I put the letter in a zip lock before handing it off. I've been sending letters from the wilderness since my first trip in 1968 and have never had one fail to arrive. "



I like this idea. Letter writing is, unfortunately, a dying art and it is a neat way to include a loved one in on the experience of your trip."


This is a great idea. I might have to borrow this one.
 
billconner
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12/14/2021 12:47PM  
When I did Philmont trek, I brought post cards and stamps and every "outpost" stop had a mail drop. Granted to hê en laat couple arrived after my return but it was appreciated at home. Kind of fun.
 
billconner
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12/14/2021 12:58PM  
Lot to read in this thread. Can't help but wonder if the virulent anti-communicators are married or single or divorced. I freely admit I use one because my wife asked me to.
 
12/14/2021 03:22PM  
billconner: "Lot to read in this thread. Can't help but wonder if the virulent anti-communicators are married or single or divorced. I freely admit I use one because my wife asked me to."

I'm a non-Communicator, not anti. Communicators are uxorious. Or don't trust their wives to make decisions while they're gone.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14081)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
12/14/2021 03:59PM  
bobbernumber3: "billconner: "Lot to read in this thread. Can't help but wonder if the virulent anti-communicators are married or single or divorced. I freely admit I use one because my wife asked me to."


I'm a non-Communicator, not anti. Communicators are uxorious. Or don't trust their wives to make decisions while they're gone."


Trust has nothing to do with the decision to stay in touch with my wife.
 
billconner
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12/14/2021 06:18PM  
bobbernumber3: "billconner: "Lot to read in this thread. Can't help but wonder if the virulent anti-communicators are married or single or divorced. I freely admit I use one because my wife asked me to."


I'm a non-Communicator, not anti. Communicators are uxorious. Or don't trust their wives to make decisions while they're gone."


Nothing to do with me. I'm still using a Spot 2 - and send a one-way "I'm OK" message once a day.

 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
12/14/2021 09:53PM  
bobbernumber3: "billconner: "Lot to read in this thread. Can't help but wonder if the virulent anti-communicators are married or single or divorced. I freely admit I use one because my wife asked me to."
I'm a non-Communicator, not anti. Communicators are uxorious. Or don't trust their wives to make decisions while they're gone."

Bobber, you post with condescending tongue. It's not very becoming.
 
RunningFox
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12/14/2021 11:14PM  
Porkeater: "RunningFox: "Another expensive electronic device, no doubt made in China . . . With a poorly written instruction manual that must be read and memorized. . . And a warranty “card” to register on a hard to navigate website with special offers for added distraction? …And subscription fees to be paid thru perpetuity? How can I, or any canoeist, possibly resist this temptation?



Not “speaking” with loved ones daily — just to “check-in”? What would mother say? She would worry, and so I suppose I should too. No doubt Jesus would take one on his wilderness trip if China was making these little miracles back then. He too had a mother.



And then there’s my personal safety - what if? Never mind I take greater risks in my daily driving. So, what if? I wasn’t meant to die. I can never be too safe or secure — ya know?



Where is Calvin Rutstrum when we need him (to further explain this new way of the “wilderness”)?



"



So nice of you to share your condescension. Sorry that many of us don't live up to your standards. What a fun place this is!"


To be clear, I’m not trying to set a standard to be lived up to by you or others. I’m sharing my feelings about communication devices. Truth is I almost bought one at one point. Glad I didn’t (at this point). I rented a sat phone twice; we didn’t need it. Told myself it was for others’ safety in our group. Personally, I feel some of the adventure is lost by carrying a communication device. Frankly, I feel safety and staying in touch with others on a daily basis are over rated when used to justify the cost, complexity, and bubble packaging associated with these devices. There are other values beyond safety and social interaction to be considered. There is philosophy and perception of experience.



 
12/15/2021 06:39AM  
Jackfish: "
Bobber, you post with condescending tongue. It's not very becoming."


My fault. Bad humor... sorry all.
 
billconner
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12/15/2021 07:30AM  
Running Fox - I appreciate your points. I resisted it at first when my wife asked, but now, pretty simple. While setting up camp, I set Spot on fire ring, turn on, an press "I'm OK" button. An hour or so later I put it back in my pack. Seems trivial effort for my wife's peace of mind and not much different than looking at my watch. Certainly less intrusive than using a weather radio (which I never have even considered).

I am looking at a 2-way communicator. Seems like an option to continue trekking into my 70's and maybe beyond. The fact that much of that will be in Adirondacks, where cell service is not perfect but pretty good, takes pressure off upgrading soon.
 
Banksiana
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12/15/2021 09:34AM  
RunningFox: "
To be clear, I’m not trying to set a standard to be lived up to by you or others. I’m sharing my feelings about communication devices. Truth is I almost bought one at one point. Glad I didn’t (at this point). I rented a sat phone twice; we didn’t need it. Told myself it was for others’ safety in our group. Personally, I feel some of the adventure is lost by carrying a communication device. Frankly, I feel safety and staying in touch with others on a daily basis are over rated when used to justify the cost, complexity, and bubble packaging associated with these devices. There are other values beyond safety and social interaction to be considered. There is philosophy and perception of experience.

"


I share much of your sense of things but still carry a SPOT (one way communication- and I'm ok/I am here or HELP! choice. I bought it because my family and friends fretted about my extended Quetico solos. I found it an imposition at first but it eventually brought me a sense of freedom. Previous to the SPOT I felt somewhat wedded to a route and itinerary the SPOT allows me to travel randomly and wander off plan or to travel without plan. I hit the "I am here" button around dusk and no longer feel compelled to produce a plan or itinerary so someone can find the body.
 
fishnfreak
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12/15/2021 10:12AM  
Best part of the trip is when I get just North of Duluth and I no longer have cell service. For what its worth, if I can't leave home for a week without worry that all will be fine..... then I'm either a micro manager or didn't do what I needed to before I left to put my mind at ease.
 
12/15/2021 01:49PM  
sedges: "Kind of old-fashioned, but I send my sweetheart(if she is not with me on the trip) letters from the wilderness. My trips are minimum ten days, so they have time to get there before i exit. I send one at the start of the second day, handing it off to someone going out the way I came in. Its just to let her know I'm feeling good on the first portages. i'm kind of old, so it reassures her that I'm likely to make it through the trip. Then I'll pass one off to someone on the middle day of the trip. It usually gets there a couple of days before I get out. If I am in a busy area, I might send more.


People are always happy to drop it in the mail on their way home, or at the office of an outfitter if they will be passing through one. I put the letter in a zip lock before handing it off. I've been sending letters from the wilderness since my first trip in 1968 and have never had one fail to arrive. "


I think this is one of the sweetest posts I have ever read on here! What a great idea!! Since I was always with my sweetheart on our canoe trips, it wouldn’t have worked for us, but it is still a great idea. Would have been a fun thing for our children who were waiting for us back in MInneapolis, and sorry I didn’t think of it four decades ago!
 
WonderMonkey
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01/21/2022 10:28PM  
I have a Garmin InReach that sends up my tracks at some interval to give my wife a level of comfort of where the insurance guy can find my body. I send a text (through the InReach) when I leave a campsite and when I arrive at the next one. If nothing else I'll send an end of the evening "I'm alive" text.

On my last trip, I helped her figure out what to do with my daughter's vehicle that had an issue. She COULD have done just fine on her own and would have, but two texts on each of our parts over a few hours made it go well.

Someone mentioned escaping the pressures of home. I don't have or feel those pressures. Heck, I'd bring my wife if she would come along.
 
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