Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Group Forum: Solo Tripping
      Items You Add or Drop For Solo Trips     

Author

Text

thinblueline
distinguished member (463)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 08:47AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
All my trips have been tandem, which seems to allow for bringing certain things to not only survive but to be comfortable for however long, because you have the added packs and person to carry them. I have my first solo planned for late May and I decided to go big or go home with a nine night trip into Quetico.

It appears there is just no way for me to single portage so I've accepted I will be double portaging. As I try to reduce what I take to reduce weight, I'm curious what you solo specialists drop from your tandem or group equipment lists when going solo, or what you might even add when going solo.

Right off the top of my head, I know I'm dropping the folding toilet seat I bring for my wife. I'm also debating on leaving behind my Helinox chair and my CCS 10x10 tarp but being up there nine nights is a long time to go without a chair and tarp, so I don't know. So what do you folks add or drop for your solo trips?
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
HappyHuskies
distinguished member (383)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 09:24AM  
First, everyone's trip is different. Only you know what you "need" to stay safe and comfortable. Personally I don't change very much when going solo compared to going with my wife or a buddy. Instead of a two person tent I take a solo tent. I take a smaller cook pot (usually ether 550 ml or 640 ml) and I leave my bowl and mug at home and just drink my hot beverages out of my pot. I do freezer bag cooking exclusively when going solo, so no need for a bowl to eat out of. Off the top of my head, that is about all that I change.

I single portage when solo or paddling with someone else. My solo boat is quite a bit lighter than my tandem, so makes up for any minor differences in gear weight that might otherwise be shared. I should add that I pack like a backpacker for canoe trips, largely because that is the gear that I have.

Take what makes you smile. No right answers here. It's all good!
 
jeepgirl
distinguished member (441)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 12:19PM  
I take a smaller camera and less food. Other than that, I don't change what I take from going tandem. I have through the years bought lighter gear. That has helped lighten the load without sacrificing what is important to me. Take what makes you happy. As Happy Huskies said there is no right or wrong answer. I double portage when soloing and when going with others.
 
02/05/2016 12:31PM  
depends if i'm moving every day or base camping, when moving no chair, smaller hand saw, less food, 1 fishing pole, less tackle, coffee can stove, smaller tarp, less rope and just alot less stuff.
 
02/05/2016 03:26PM  
I would not go without a tarp. Learned that lesson back around 1986. I use a crazy creek canoe seat that doubles as a chair in camp. No binoculars or hatchet. I bring a folding saw.

Real food I mostly leave at home too. I now have a dehydrator so can do things like pork and beans and fruit for home made gorp. I'm leaving behind the salami and cheese this year too. Lots of oatmeal and then freeze dried for dinners. No fry pan. Grill fish filets in foil but no frying.

 
02/05/2016 04:25PM  
I almost always go solo so it is more what would I change if I were to go tandem. I would up-size the cook kit and food items and bring a larger tarp. I hang and have back up hammocks for guests so that would not be much change.
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(1931)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 04:41PM  


Two packs instead of one. This is so I can distribute weight in the solo canoe easier.

And that is about it. I still bring my chair and tarp though. Heck, I bring a chair when I go backpacking. Nothing beats it. Keep it in your pack I suggest.
 
HangLoose
distinguished member(814)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 04:53PM  
Good thread.

On my solo trips, I lessen the load by removing or changing a few items from pack.

The first thing that I removed for solo trips was the small sport axe that I sometimes bring along on tandems. I now bring only a small pack saw on solos.

I also leave my single burner white gas stove at home and bring a small alcohol stove instead for the solo trips.

I usually bring less food on a solo because I find that I don't eat as much when I'm alone.

I find that a kayak paddle works well for a solo canoe. You might consider strapping a spare paddle under the thwarts just in case.

I can cut my fishing gear by up to 75% or sometimes even completely while solo.

I still double portage when I am solo because I don't want to twist an ankle while out in the wilderness alone.

Good luck





 
02/05/2016 07:08PM  
I have also accepted that I'll double portage, not single portage. I leave my wife at home also, so that I can forget the toilet seat. I don't take a solar shower either.

I have gradually dropped things, or taken less of some, as well as replacing others.

I've gradually replaced gear -sleeping pad, bag, tent, tarp, stove, etc. - with smaller, lighter things.

It's not a whole lot different from a tandem trip, except that tandem loads are lighter. I do take a smaller tent. I can get by with a Sawyer Squeeze instead of my gravity filter. I take the same CCS tarp. I wouldn't go on a trip without the tarp, but I skip things that others won't.

Some things I've changed to simplify things and save time, as well as reduce bulk and weight. I'm not only the only one carrying it, I'm also the only one doing camp chores.

I eat dehydrated foods right out of the bag. Just boil water with my JetBoil and rehydrate in a cozy. Nothing to clean but the spoon. Minimizes fuel use and weight, as well as time spent on kitchen chores. I used a bear canister, but switched to an Ursack last year to save weight and bulk. It's also a lot quicker and easier than hanging. I don't take as much food as I used too and consequently, I only carry an extra pound or so around the BW rather than an extra five pounds!

I rarely have a fire, so I don't take a saw or hatchet, which reduces weight and bulk and eliminates a way for me to possibly injure myself.
I don't take a chair (yet). I don't take fishing gear anymore.

I do take a PLB, but not just on solos. I also take a weather radio. I take a headlamp for light, but don't use it much.

 
thinblueline
distinguished member (463)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 08:13PM  
Thank you all for the great input. So far what I've decided from the responses is I will leave my Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe behind and stick with just my folding saw. I will also keep my tarp and chair, and already plan on a smaller tent. I will reduce my fishing tackle by 50 percent but fishing is important and I want to eat fish two or three times so I can't eliminate it completely. On a tandem trip, I might take three rods for myself, but now I will only take two....one for trolling and or casting heavier lures and one for jigging and casting smaller lures.

I think I'll leave my frying pan behind and cook all my fish in foil over a fire like someone suggested. I'll stick with my tiny little canister stove and a couple canisters because that is just so easy for boiling water for hot beverages and dehydrated meals. My cooking gear will be reduced to one small pot. In general, I'll reduce my food to a mere oatmeal bar for each morning, an energy bar for lunches, and one big meal for the day consisting of a 2.5 serving freeze dried meal and/or fish with a side. Maybe a big bag of MM peanuts as a snack!

Instead of two bent shaft paddles, I think I will rent a kayak paddle from the outfitter to use in big wind or when I want to eat up some distance, but since I've never used a kayak paddle I'll still bring one of my bent shafts in case I don't like it or when I'm fishing and leisurely paddling.

I might leave my small shovel or trowel behind because I've found I can dig just as good of a cat hole with a stout stick as I can with the trowel. I always burn my toilet paper.

I'll bring a Luci light for my tent lighting and of course a headlamp for getting around camp. I think I will either buy a Delorme Inreach SE or borrow my friend's, as that will give my wife a little peace of mind and for me an avenue of communicating the need for rescue if I break a body part that prohibits me from getting out. Any other ideas are greatly appreciated but this has been a good start to streamline what I take.


 
kanoes
distinguished member(24748)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
02/05/2016 08:37PM  
I would go without a chair....id NEVER go without a tarp. also, bring a trowel. the orange ones weight almost nothing. paddles? a straight and a bent, yak paddles are a just crutch for bad single paddle technique. ;-)
 
02/05/2016 08:48PM  
I would never drop the tarp and the older I get, the more I know I would appreciate a chair, although I've never taken one on any trip yet. It's on my Canoecopia list for next month.
 
gkimball
distinguished member(619)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 09:27PM  
I have also tried to find lighter and less bulky gear rather than leave things behind.

I bring much simpler, basic food than when with companions as I'm pretty easy to please about eating, often eating cold meals. Switched to a squeeze-type Sawyer water filter to save weight and bulk. Switched to a Trangia alcohol stove and a home made 3 lb coffee can stick stove (to heat water) for light weight and efficiency. Switched to a 1.5 lb down sleeping bag (35 degree rating but i don't believe it.) Have actually added a couple creature comforts like a larger tarp and a comfy sleeping pad, but in as light versions as possible.

Everything's a trade off in some way.
 
gymcoachdon
distinguished member(571)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 09:44PM  
My first solo trip, I took a bent shaft paddle, and a Kayak paddle. I did use the Kayak paddle briefly into the wind on Iron, and Lac LaCroix, but I'm not sure it was really any more efficient. I just enjoy the traditional canoe stroke, I guess.
 
hobbydog
distinguished member(1977)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 10:09PM  
I think you got a good starting point. You will find what works for you and adjust. A thing about fishing....I love to fish, especially when it is good. But I am usually just too dam tired at the end of the day to fish much. I look back and think...why didn't I fish more? I wasn't really that tired out was I? But you get to do everything and when solo it is nice to just kick back and enjoy. If you are going to fish, plan on shorter days than what you would do with a group.
 
thinblueline
distinguished member (463)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 10:14PM  
quote gymcoachdon: "My first solo trip, I took a bent shaft paddle, and a Kayak paddle. I did use the Kayak paddle briefly into the wind on Iron, and Lac LaCroix, but I'm not sure it was really any more efficient. I just enjoy the traditional canoe stroke, I guess."

I wonder if the type of canoe being paddled solo would make a difference on whether to use a kayak paddle or not. For instance, a true solo like a wenonah prism or encounter or bell magic, true solos intended for hit and switch paddling, would do better with a kayak paddle, while something like a symmetrical prospector where you're paddling backwards from the front seat and using more traditional paddle strokes would of course not reap as much benefit from a kayak paddle. I don't know.
 
PineKnot
distinguished member(1884)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 10:21PM  
The only thing different between my trips with others and solos is the gear pack is a little lighter since I don't have to bring their food, clothes, bags/pads, chairs, extra kitchen gear/utinsels, etc. I find I still have to double portage though because I still bring:

A solo canoe, yoke, PFD, SPOT, yak paddle, single blade paddle, etc;

Smaller tent, same pad, bag, camp chair, tarp, bug net, saw and sport ax for evening campfires, book or two, etc;

Food--same stuff I like to eat when tripping with others, although I do tend to eat less when solo...;

Cooking gear but a smaller skillet and pot since I still like to have variety such as backed fish and pizza on the fire and fried fish from a skillet, Jetboil because I still like to have my coffee each morning;

Same fishing gear I use when I trip with others, 2-3 rod/reels, tackle, depth finder, etc (I do like to fish a bit)
 
PineKnot
distinguished member(1884)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/05/2016 10:40PM  
quote thinblueline: "quote gymcoachdon: "My first solo trip, I took a bent shaft paddle, and a Kayak paddle. I did use the Kayak paddle briefly into the wind on Iron, and Lac LaCroix, but I'm not sure it was really any more efficient. I just enjoy the traditional canoe stroke, I guess."


I wonder if the type of canoe being paddled solo would make a difference on whether to use a kayak paddle or not. For instance, a true solo like a wenonah prism or encounter or bell magic, true solos intended for hit and switch paddling, would do better with a kayak paddle, while something like a symmetrical prospector where you're paddling backwards from the front seat and using more traditional paddle strokes would of course not reap as much benefit from a kayak paddle. I don't know."


My first solo was with a tandem canoe I modified by putting a seat near the middle. I got a tow to Prairie Portage and rented a yak paddle from the outfitter just to see what it would be like on a 2+ week solo....

Bottom line is I really liked the yak paddle with the tandem canoe as a solo, especially in rougher water.

Since then, I now have paddled a Magic and Rapidifire solo canoes as well as my Northwind and I still prefer the yak paddle when traveling solo...I go to the single-blade when in twisty streams or fishing....

I would recommend you rent a yak paddle if possible and try it, bring a single blade as well, and see what works best for your style...

Happy paddling and may the wind be always at your back on your first solo!!
 
02/06/2016 07:03AM  
My biggest change is cook set. On solo I take a 700 Snow Peak for my cook pot / coffee mug, but I also have a Sea to Summit X mug that I use for drinking the first morning cup of coffee as I use the 700 for my oatmeal. I do take less food.

My first aid kit is smaller, but I still bring a good one. I used to be an EMT so I know what I need for me.

I hammock it when solo, so I do bring the Superfly to use with the Warbonnet Blackbird. I still bring my 10 x 10 CCS tarp as well. I also have a CCS 10 x 14, but it stays at home. My rope bag & stake quantity are smaller.

I bring less fishing tackle but I do bring an extra Ugly Stick 4 pc fishing pole. I caught a SMB on day 3 of a solo once that snapped the first 8" or so off of my pole (it was an Ugly Stick as well). That made fishing for the next 7 days like fishing with a broomstick. I still do bring a spare spool or line for my reel

I do not bring the Vexilar LC-10 on solo trips and from the price that they are bringing these days, maybe I should put it up for sale and buy another carbon fiber paddle.

 
02/06/2016 07:08AM  
It sounds like you have a good starting plan. You might also consider not planning as ambitious a route as you would tandem. You have to do all the work, which is more time-consuming. I usually plan a couple of miles or an hour less per day of travel, especially on portage-heavy days, and maybe an extra layover day.
 
PortageKeeper
distinguished member(2535)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/06/2016 10:09AM  
I have gone with less than 25 lbs (one pack) and have gone with full-on gear. I mostly choose to pack really light because when solo, I like to keep moving. I may use a hammock or I may use a solo tent, but I never go without a tarp because the tarp is my backup shelter. Imagine a bear deciding to rip apart your tent while you are out fishing and you are two or three days paddle from your car. Take a tarp, even if it is only a 6'X 8'. If I brought a double blade, I would definitely take a bent for a spare.
 
MacCamper
distinguished member(520)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/07/2016 09:36AM  
On my last solo of 2015 in mid-October, I brought a chair (my wife's "14 xmas present) along, a first for me as I consider myself a young 55 yo. It was nice, but added weight and bulk. On future trips I will go back to my PFD laid against a rock. Depending on time of year I consider night lighting. Long nights I bring a small lantern. Short nights just a head lamp. Same with reading material. Kindle for short nights and ipad mini for long. Last year I dropped my digital SLR from the "bring" list in October, I didn't miss it and took some great shots with my Olympus Stylus (bring extra batteries).

My 1980 vintage Optimus white gas stove was pulled from the mothballs late last summer. The unit is a backpacking set up complete with pots, tiny fry pan and accessories. I had forgotten how incredible this unit is and it is small, lightweight and complete. Re-engineered with a foil covered felt cozy, my jetboil pot sets real nice on top of the stove. No more canisters, however I do bring fuel in an aluminum bottle. The trade off here is a much smaller cook kit. I love to fish but have cut my gear to only the necessities. If I lose a lure I trade up to something else.

Something I added was a thermos, per Cliff Jacobson's suggestion, and dropped one h2O bottle. Once my jet pot is boiling I fill the thermos for hot water throughout the meal, you know how quick water cools in the BW. Just prior to hitting the water, I boil up another pot for hot coffee on the trail.

In cool seasons I will also add a small micro fiber blanket to warm a chilly afternoon of reading in camp or just an extra layer if night temps get below 20° as they did last October. The first night I thought layering my rain gear would be a dandy extra layer. Unfortunately it collected condensation and saturated my bag. The blanket, that my dog had used to cuddle in at night, became my extra layer. Perfect solution.

A Lean 1+ is in my future to reduce a tent and tarp from the solo load.

Love to have both double and single blades on board. The double for speed and or wind and the blade for pure enjoyment.

I always bring a weather radio and plan my trek based roughly upon anticipated weather conditions as I like to have the breeze at my back.

Mac
 
cgchase
distinguished member (215)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/07/2016 10:15AM  
I go solo a lot but this year will be my first time solo in the bwca. I plan to bring the same stuff that I brought on my tandem trip PLUS a few extras. The extras being:

An extra tarp so I can set up a cooking area and/or make my camp seem "bigger". I don't know why, but I have this idea in my head that a group of 5 will come along and tell me they really need my site since I'm only one person.

Reading material - obviously.

A decent camera - on my tandem trips I just took pics with my phone but I think being solo I will want to take better pictures.

The only thing I'm dropping is the booze - no need for that on a solo trip.

 
02/07/2016 11:21AM  
I solo backpack and kayak with only one solo canoe trip under my belt, so take the following for what it's worth.

I usually only take my stick stove now. I used to take a pop can alcohol stove as backup, but I've never used it instead of the stick stove.

I always take my kindle and my chair.

I hang, so it's hammock, bug net and tarp. I carry a second small tarp to use, so I'm not cooking and sleeping under the same tarp.

I always take too much food and too much tackle. Just can't bring myself to pare the tackle down any further and the extra food is justified by thinking I might get delayed a day or two due to weather.
 
BLee
senior member (89)senior membersenior member
 
02/08/2016 04:50PM  
My first solo I took way too much stuff, mostly food. I like two fishing poles, one for casting and one for jigging. I like a small light weight chair, just because I'm not flexible.

I will cut down on food and tackle this June.

I like a small axe. Just because I like to split wood and it gives me something to do.

I bring a tarp and bought a two person Big Agnes tent this summer to use, which will cut down weight.

I'm going to try to take just dehydrated food this time and fish for my meals.

My first solo, I had to triple portage and it just about killed me. Got me in shape real quick though and I felt more alive a few days later than I have in a long time.
 
02/08/2016 05:47PM  
Weather in May is always a toss up. That length of trip the forecasts are less reliable so you may need a warm layer and some extra socks, maybe even a extra set of clothes. That plus the amount of food makes if difficult to single portage. But if backpackers can gear up and have 6-8 as of food why can't paddlers....

I brought way to much food my first paddle solo. I eat a big dinner and your right on with a 2.5 serving meal and a small desert. I don't regret bringing my chair and tarp one bit. Or my heavy ENO hammock to lounge in. The extra cold weather gear I brought...couldn't be helped. I broke my saw mid-trip and did just fine without one.

Last May or the May prior I brought 3 sets of clothing and after 4 solid days of wet weather I was wearing my last dry set of clothes. Not the greatest feeling knowing you have nothing truly dry to change into.

I think you may find you will either travel longer, or set up camp and explore/fish more. Consider a top end life jacket as well since you will be in the seat more or longer.

I hated using a double blade in a solo canoe. In a magic I sat to high, the angles were wrong, and the tips were so high the water continually dripped down the shaft and I ended up wet. It stayed secured to the thwarts an entire 90 mile trip.

I brought a small aluminum pot to boil water on the campfire for washing up, dishes, etc. I nested other stuff into it and it was worthwhile.

The single biggest weight and bulk savings will come down to your sleeping bag and your shelter. And the highest costs.

Regards,
A fellow WI blueline brother
 
thinblueline
distinguished member (463)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/08/2016 08:49PM  
quote Exo: "Weather in May is always a toss up. That length of trip the forecasts are less reliable so you may need a warm layer and some extra socks, maybe even a extra set of clothes. That plus the amount of food makes if difficult to single portage. But if backpackers can gear up and have 6-8 as of food why can't paddlers....


I brought way to much food my first paddle solo. I eat a big dinner and your right on with a 2.5 serving meal and a small desert. I don't regret bringing my chair and tarp one bit. Or my heavy ENO hammock to lounge in. The extra cold weather gear I brought...couldn't be helped. I broke my saw mid-trip and did just fine without one.


Last May or the May prior I brought 3 sets of clothing and after 4 solid days of wet weather I was wearing my last dry set of clothes. Not the greatest feeling knowing you have nothing truly dry to change into.


I think you may find you will either travel longer, or set up camp and explore/fish more. Consider a top end life jacket as well since you will be in the seat more or longer.







I hated using a double blade in a solo canoe. In a magic I sat to high, the angles were wrong, and the tips were so high the water continually dripped down the shaft and I ended up wet. It stayed secured to the thwarts an entire 90 mile trip.


I brought a small aluminum pot to boil water on the campfire for washing up, dishes, etc. I nested other stuff into it and it was worthwhile.


The single biggest weight and bulk savings will come down to your sleeping bag and your shelter. And the highest costs.


Regards,
A fellow WI blueline brother
"


What community do you serve?
 
wetcanoedog
distinguished member(4446)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
02/08/2016 10:45PM  
last Fall i cut back by taking a Gaz burner head and some cartridges rather than my Peak Feather and bottles of gas.
i left the big Baker Shelter and took MSR tarp tent.
food was a big cut back with not as many snack and candy bars.
left one book behind,took two.
same with tee shirts and shorts,took half of what i would take.
left my sneakers for campsite wear and took light house slippers.
now that i have a PLB i removed a lot of long term survival gear from my PLB.some "just in case"stuff stayed home like spare knives and flashlights.
 
02/09/2016 04:41PM  
I do not drop much other than food, amount of fuel and small ax (never have fires when I am alone).
 
RetiredDave
distinguished member (308)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/10/2016 10:58AM  
If you are interested in twig burning stoves, I recommend checking out the Emberlit. I have one, used it some on my most recent solo and I really like it. It packs up into the size of a CD.

Also, if you want to drop the axe but still have split would, go to youtube and check out the 'baton' technique for splitting wood. All you need is a good fixed blade knife.

By the way, I am 65 and I triple portage, even the long ones. I find that I would much rather split the weight up no matter how long it takes me to walk. But then I'm not as strong as some of the younger, more fit members here. (Wish I was!)

Good luck and enjoy your trip!

Dave
 
02/10/2016 04:31PM  
I'll second the emberlit suggestion above.
 
02/13/2016 02:49PM  
hooky and RetiredDave, do you take a backup burner in case of a fire ban? Any burner that produces ash is not allowed during fire bans.

I wind up adding some gear on solo ventures, no shared items like cooking/food, tarp, or even water treatment. Either way I pack pretty light and small.

butthead
 
02/13/2016 07:31PM  
I've never gone anywhere during a burn ban. If I did, I'd just take my pop can stove and alcohol.
 
02/14/2016 06:46AM  
quote hooky: "I've never gone anywhere during a burn ban. If I did, I'd just take my pop can stove and alcohol."

I think someone had noted on a thread some time back that even alcohol stoves were not permitted during a fire ban/restriction, which really surprised me. I think they had even linked or quoted the specific section that applied. And there's always the chance, especially on a longer trip, that one might be instituted after you had entered without the back up stove. You might want to double check that.
 
Merlin
distinguished member (377)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/14/2016 07:16AM  
My solo set up is mostly just down sizing. Smaller pot, stove and tarp. Since I won't have a buddy out fishing me with his hot lure, I will take a smaller tackle box.

I always make sure to pinch down the barbs on my hooks. Imagine having a set of treblles in your hand when you are alone.



 
02/14/2016 02:58PM  
quote boonie: "quote hooky: "I've never gone anywhere during a burn ban. If I did, I'd just take my pop can stove and alcohol."


I think someone had noted on a thread some time back that even alcohol stoves were not permitted during a fire ban/restriction, which really surprised me. I think they had even linked or quoted the specific section that applied. And there's always the chance, especially on a longer trip, that one might be instituted after you had entered without the back up stove. You might want to double check that."


That doesn't make much sense to me. I guess I'll look into it.
 
RetiredDave
distinguished member (308)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/15/2016 05:11PM  
quote butthead: "hooky and RetiredDave, do you take a backup burner in case of a fire ban? Any burner that produces ash is not allowed during fire bans.


I wind up adding some gear on solo ventures, no shared items like cooking/food, tarp, or even water treatment. Either way I pack pretty light and small.


butthead"


The twig burner was a new purchase this year and just a backup. I wanted to try it out and it really performs. I rely on a little gas stove.

Dave
 
Nineteenpack
member (35)member
 
02/21/2016 07:11PM  
JetBoil
Sleeping Bag with DryBag
1 LT Water Bottles X2
Sea to Summit Sleeping Mat
AA Barratries
Lighter/Flint
Gortex Suit
Hat
Garmin
Toilet Paper
Head Lamp
Knife (I split wood with this)
Quick Dry Towel
Tooth Brush/Paste
Glo Sticks X2
Gas Tank for JetBoil
Muckboots
Water Shoes
Light Weight Camp Chair (folds up to a 4"X11" tube well worth it)
BWCA Full Detail Map
Compas
Kayak Bow Bag
Kayak Hull Bag
20L DryBag X 3
Soap
Water Tabs
First Aid Kit
Map Case
Alps Mountaineering Zephyr 2 w/Footprint (packs small and is pretty light)
OR Waterproof Shell Mitts
Light Weight Lantern (Battery operated)
JetBoil Spark Kit
Sven Saw
50' of 550 Cord w/carabineer (hanging food bag)
Cabela”s Boundary ll 5000 cuin pack
PDF
Small Garbage bag
Sea to Summit collapsible bowl, cup
Titanium Spoon/Fork/Knife

I have to double portage but I like the walkers through the trail as much as the paddle through the lakes. I'm working on getting a little more lean but I like the fall trips and need a little more equipment to stay warm. Food is simple and cheap Breakfast is 2 oatmeal packets, Lunch (when I get hungry again) cliff bar, trail mix and beef jerky, Dinner is Mac & Cheese put into a sandwich bag with a pouch of tuna or chicken. I use my clothes bag for a pillow and boil water in a bind. I've drank it straight out of the lake if Im out far enough. No such thing as wind locked in a Kayak!

Dave
 
02/22/2016 05:09PM  
quote Nineteenpack: "JetBoil
Sleeping Bag with DryBag
1 LT Water Bottles X2
Sea to Summit Sleeping Mat
AA Barratries
Lighter/Flint
Gortex Suit
Hat
Garmin
Toilet Paper
Head Lamp
Knife (I split wood with this)
Quick Dry Towel
Tooth Brush/Paste
Glo Sticks X2
Gas Tank for JetBoil
Muckboots
Water Shoes
Light Weight Camp Chair (folds up to a 4"X11" tube well worth it)
BWCA Full Detail Map
Compas
Kayak Bow Bag
Kayak Hull Bag
20L DryBag X 3
Soap
Water Tabs
First Aid Kit
Map Case
Alps Mountaineering Zephyr 2 w/Footprint (packs small and is pretty light)
OR Waterproof Shell Mitts
Light Weight Lantern (Battery operated)
JetBoil Spark Kit
Sven Saw
50' of 550 Cord w/carabineer (hanging food bag)
Cabela”s Boundary ll 5000 cuin pack
PDF
Small Garbage bag
Sea to Summit collapsible bowl, cup
Titanium Spoon/Fork/Knife


I have to double portage but I like the walkers through the trail as much as the paddle through the lakes. I'm working on getting a little more lean but I like the fall trips and need a little more equipment to stay warm. Food is simple and cheap Breakfast is 2 oatmeal packets, Lunch (when I get hungry again) cliff bar, trail mix and beef jerky, Dinner is Mac & Cheese put into a sandwich bag with a pouch of tuna or chicken. I use my clothes bag for a pillow and boil water in a bind. I've drank it straight out of the lake if Im out far enough. No such thing as wind locked in a Kayak!


Dave
"


Any idea what your weight is?
That didn't look too bad if it is under 40#'s, I take more creature comforts when the canoe does the hauling, rather than backpacking.
I solo for a week at just under 40 pounds, my canoe is 35#. Due to my age 52 and some back issue's I really never plan to single portage. So I figure why not bring some comforts.
When I back pack im getting down to 25#'s, and hope to get lighter.
 
muddyfeet
distinguished member(753)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/22/2016 09:14PM  
Add for solo:
-lighter cookset
-Rented DeLorme
-journal
-sisu

Leave behind for solo trip:
-Hatchet (rely on batoning if needed)
-2/3 fishing gear
-cribbage board
-box (bag)wine
-social skills
-anything not immediately necessary or too heavy (lots of personal preference here)

I agree a tarp is necessary for all trips, but I hammock camp so it is part of the kit anyway. I might even bring two.

Packing a solo trip for single-portaging really teaches you how to pack well and deliberately.
 
02/23/2016 06:16AM  
quote muddyfeet:
-social skills

I agree a tarp is necessary for all trips, but I hammock camp so it is part of the kit anyway. I might even bring two.

"


That's funny. I also want you to know there's a private "hanging forum" here if you're not already aware. Go to the home page of messageboard and there's a list down at the bottom.

The item that's on the fence for me this year is my binoculars. I rarely use them but they can be so useful in seeing if sites are being used or maybe a moose back in a bay. I'm already taking a depth finder and an Eno Singlenest hammock as luxuries. I guess I'll see how the packing goes.



 
TrekScouter
distinguished member (374)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2016 11:45AM  
I feel the same way about the binoculars. They seem like dead weight most of the time, but when I need them, they're a big help.
 
sueb2b
distinguished member (233)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/22/2016 10:42PM  
I really appreciated having a radio on my solo. Much more than I thought I would. Couldn't get in the weather stations (why I'd originally brought it) but I did get NPR.
 
04/23/2016 06:56AM  
quote sueb2b: "I really appreciated having a radio on my solo. Much more than I thought I would. Couldn't get in the weather stations (why I'd originally brought it) but I did get NPR. "

Curious which radio you bought.

 
Nineteenpack
member (35)member
 
06/08/2016 10:11PM  

Any idea what your weight is?
That didn't look too bad if it is under 40#'s, I take more creature comforts when the canoe does the hauling, rather than backpacking.
I solo for a week at just under 40 pounds, my canoe is 35#. Due to my age 52 and some back issue's I really never plan to single portage. So I figure why not bring some comforts.
When I back pack I'm getting down to 25#'s, and hope to get lighter."

Not sure what the exact weight is off the top of my head but I know its under 60lbs everything included. Im 6'2" 205lbs and don't have any issue lugging it around. I will be looking to slim down a bit for 2016 BWCA Trip.
 
06/09/2016 06:34AM  
I've decided to cut my weather radio from my Sept. trip. Less weight and more adventure are the reasons. I'm also going without my trusty crazy creek seat pat/backrest and just using a pad.

I'm just trying to get more basic and old school for this trip. I did buy an Eno hammock so that, along with 2 books and my journal are my luxuries.

 
06/10/2016 09:35AM  
quote TomT: "I've decided to cut my weather radio from my Sept.
I'm just trying to get more basic and old school for this trip. I did buy an Eno hammock so that, along with 2 books and my journal are my luxuries.
"


In AK my weather radio is considered part of my survival gear, I do not carry it in my ditch kit. It just lets me know wether to venture out on a certain day of stay put. My weather radio Weighs about 4-5 ounces and works darn good.
With all of my survival gear, no one piece is stand alone ment to save my life, (except life jacket) they are considered parts of a whole package, that when put together with every other piece of survival gear, increase my chances of having a positive outcome from a negative situation.

I won't second guess anyone's reason for leaving a weather radio home in the BW or Quetico. With every decision we need to weigh Risk Vs Gain.

The binoculars are a comfort that I leave home now. Pic of some of my essential gear when traveling in Griz country in AK.
 
jeepgirl
distinguished member (441)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/10/2016 12:14PM  
I left my hammock at home this last trip. It was a good thing since there was not much dry weather between Memorial Day and June 5th.
 
06/10/2016 12:41PM  
quote LindenTree3: "quote TomT: "I've decided to cut my weather radio from my Sept.
I'm just trying to get more basic and old school for this trip. I did buy an Eno hammock so that, along with 2 books and my journal are my luxuries.
"



In AK my weather radio is considered part of my survival gear, I do not carry it in my ditch kit. It just lets me know wether to venture out on a certain day of stay put. My weather radio Weighs about 4-5 ounces and works darn good.
With all of my survival gear, no one piece is stand alone ment to save my life, (except life jacket) they are considered parts of a whole package, that when put together with every other piece of survival gear, increase my chances of having a positive outcome from a negative situation.


I won't second guess anyone's reason for leaving a weather radio home in the BW or Quetico. With every decision we need to weigh Risk Vs Gain.
."


I'm going to bring a barometer. The prediction of the radio takes a bit of the adventure out of it. I want to read the sky more and make decisions based on using my senses. Bringin' it old school this time.
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next