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      How do you carry your eggs?     

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nicek
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03/26/2014 08:59AM
Some ideas are: plastic egg carrier, pressed boxes wrapped in bubble wrap, storing/taping on the bottom of a canoe seat....
I usually buy medium size and carry them in the plastic egg carrier with extra paper towel layer inside the box.
This spring I will be cooking for 9 of us and just the number of eggs needed for 2 planned breakfasts will require some more logistics. Any other ideas.
 
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OldFingers57
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03/26/2014 10:00AM
I just got a plastic egg carrier last year or I should say I found one someone had left at a campsite. I used to just use the cardboard ones they came in and had them protected with some other foods in a hard sided cooler or had them in a soft sided cooler down in one of my barrels. We also used different sizes of Tupperware containers or old protein powder containers with the eggs wrapped in paper towels.
 
nicek
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03/26/2014 10:41AM
We also used different sizes of Tupperware containers or old protein powder containers with the eggs wrapped in paper towels. "

I am pleased to hear this method was successful. Cylindrical shapes should provide solid protection. Extra paper towels are always great to use around camp!
 
mr.barley
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03/26/2014 10:45AM
Bring a few chickens with you.
 
CrookedPaddler1
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03/26/2014 11:08AM
cardboard egg containers from the store. That way I can use them as firestarters as we use up the eggs.
 
Savage Voyageur
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03/26/2014 11:57AM
We take a few of those yellow plastic egg holders. The trouble with these are you can't take large eggs, the holder only fits regular size eggs.
 
billconner
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03/26/2014 12:41PM
Medium, as fresh as possible, in the pressed paper cartons, two wraps of bubble wrap held with a bungee dealy bob, laid on top of food pack - a CCS Deluxe pack. Never a crack. Have taken two dozen - two people for many days.
 
OBX2Kayak
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03/26/2014 03:00PM
Dehydrated.
 
neutroner
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03/26/2014 05:27PM
I keep them in the Cardboard style container, wrapped in a grocery plastic bag. I use a separate cooler pack I made, so I have never had a problem with breakage. Usually we have enough eggs for 4-6 days, unless we choose to bring less. I intend to bring farm fresh ones next time so I can worry lees on spoilage. For coating fish I always use powder eggs for a wash and at the end of longer trips for cooking. I made the mistake ONCE to cook the dried eggs as scrambled substitute. I found the brand I chose inedible (fine for fish coating).
 
schweady
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03/26/2014 10:01PM
Plastic egg carrier. Once, when the bear hang branch broke and it all came down with a crash, only 2 eggs slightly damaged out of 2 dozen.
 
Clod
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03/29/2014 01:07PM
Last 2 trips, Before we leaveI I fry up a pound or two of sausage , depending on size of group. After sausage is done and drained I add eggs to the fried sausage. Then I freeze the concoction raw eggs and fried sausage in a Tupperware container and when we leave I put it in our cooler with the frozen meat we are taking in. Then in 2 or 3 days we take it out and fry it up for scrambled eggs and sausage. So far it has been a big hit.
 
okinaw55
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03/29/2014 07:21PM
quote schweady: "Plastic egg carrier. Once, when the bear hang branch broke and it all came down with a crash, only 2 eggs slightly damaged out of 2 dozen.
"


That's a pretty glowing endorsement for the plastic egg containers. I've seen Coleman selling these containers. Are there any that are cheaper / better?
 
schweady
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03/29/2014 08:48PM
quote okinaw55: "quote schweady: "Plastic egg carrier. Once, when the bear hang branch broke and it all came down with a crash, only 2 eggs slightly damaged out of 2 dozen.
"



That's a pretty glowing endorsement for the plastic egg containers. I've seen Coleman selling these containers. Are there any that are cheaper / better?"

Well, sure, they were in the top area of a larger food pack, but still pretty pleased. Basic Coghlans carriers or maybe even some other cheaper yet knock-offs that we've used for many years.
 
03/31/2014 09:52PM
I use Ova Easy eggs. Best tasting eggs by a long shot. Long shelf life. Bake with them, scramble them up, and no shells.
 
billconner
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04/01/2014 09:05AM
quote Knoozer: "I use Ova Easy eggs. Best tasting eggs by a long shot. Long shelf life. Bake with them, scramble them up, and no shells."

And no over easy or sunny side up!

To each their own.
 
PixiePaddler
member (44)member
 
04/01/2014 11:22AM
How about fresh eggs straight from the chicken? They don't need refrigeration until they are washed, right? So...if you can keep them from breaking, they should last pretty long. Or am I crazy?
 
PixiePaddler
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04/01/2014 11:22AM
How about fresh eggs straight from the chicken? They don't need refrigeration until they are washed, right? So...if you can keep them from breaking, they should last pretty long. Or am I crazy?
 
billconner
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04/01/2014 11:49AM
quote PixiePaddler: "How about fresh eggs straight from the chicken? They don't need refrigeration until they are washed, right? So...if you can keep them from breaking, they should last pretty long. Or am I crazy?"

You'll get both sides on this. I always have been fine with taking eggs and not refrigerating, and some others have here, but there is a lot of strong opinions on both sides. If you have concerns and want to take fresh eggs refrigerated, it seems most will agree that eggs from free range or pasture raised farms that have not been washed would be the safest. But it's strictly comparing odds and I can't swear it's the fact.

I'm good with picking up mediums at Zups in Ely - smaller eggs are reported thicker shelled and more naturally break resistant - and carrying refrigerated.

And someone here will tell me I'm risking food poisoning from salmonella. (Helped with Scout skit called Sam and Ellas once upon a time - of course about the dining hall.)
 
schweady
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04/01/2014 01:16PM
Ours ride in the top of the non-refrigerated food pack, used by 3rd morning.
 
sdebol
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04/02/2014 04:34PM
quote Knoozer: "I use Ova Easy eggs. Best tasting eggs by a long shot. Long shelf life. Bake with them, scramble them up, and no shells."
^this
 
jeroldharter
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04/09/2014 11:36PM
Ova Easy
 
Springishere
Guest Paddler
 
04/10/2014 08:22AM
If we are going to use fresh eggs only for our first day, I have cracked the eggs into a food safe container such a small nalgene. Shake & scramble, pour and cook. No egg shells, clean & use the container to rehydrate other meals. On long trips I forgo fresh eggs for other meals, preferring my egg fix on my travels to/from my destination. Car camping I take a Tupperware egg carrier that is ridiculously bulky but effective-extra large/jumbo eggs won't fit in this. Otherwise, egg carton wrapped in a little newspaper.
 
04/10/2014 08:28AM
quote billconner: "Medium, as fresh as possible, in the pressed paper cartons, two wraps of bubble wrap held with a bungee dealy bob, laid on top of food pack - a CCS Deluxe pack. Never a crack. Have taken two dozen - two people for many days."

Similar here except that we wrap ours in two brown paper grocery bags instead of the bubble wrap and duct-tape them under the stern seat of the canoe. Paper cartons and even the bags can be emergency fire-starter, or will compress very small and light to carry out.

I do not cook eggs "sunny-side up" or over easy after the first day, but if they are well cooked have no problem keeping them for a few days. We don't travel in July or August, and we don't let them sit out in the hot sun at camp either. Set the bag in the shade somewhere.

The only times I have used the hard plastic egg containers I have had breakage.

If I use powdered eggs, I have found that the Ova Easy are the best. We also sometimes use the Back Packers Pantry Denver Omelet.

 
nicek
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04/10/2014 10:31AM
This May I will cook for 9 of us. First time in seven spring trips we'll have a max number on the permit. I guess people enjoy tripping with us ( my best friend and I organize these outings). Planning meals for such an "army" presents with several logistical issues. Carrying eggs is one of them. Your responses are greatly appreciated.
 
drrick
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04/11/2014 04:01PM
Folks, We have raised chickens (free range ) for 20 years now. The eggs keep very well unrefrigerated at room temp. if they are unwashed. With higher temp. you will see some development of the ovum in fertilized eggs. The advise previously given here is all IMO very good. Buy unrefrigerated/unwashed farm fresh eggs and keep them out of the direct sun.

Cook the eggs fully and you will have very little to no problems with salmonella.

Once refrigerated eggs must stay refrigerated.

With fresh eggs the yolk will be firm and stand tall.

With fresh eggs the shell will be harder to remove cleanly.

Free range eggs will have brighter color in the yolk.

We carry our eggs in the cardboard packaging and wrap a layer of cardboard around the egg carton with rubber bands.

Happy trails, Rick


 
bhouse46
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04/15/2014 03:54PM
No science behind this but is sure seems to me brown eggs have thicker shells. I use the pressed paper egg containers with an extra paper towel for cushion, wrap with duct tape, this in a zip lock (just in case)and wrapped in kitchen towel then packed snugly with cool things. I am experimenting with bubble wrap rather than soft sided cooler. I stopped using the yellow crate as it was something else to tote around when empty and the system I use has not failed.
 
togue
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04/15/2014 06:05PM
When I bring them just pre-cook them scrambled or omelets then vacuum seal them. Cook sausage or bacon and seal that with them. Freeze until trip, boil in the bag for breakfast.
 
Jaywalker
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04/15/2014 09:17PM
I've heard enough convincing feedback about OvaEasy to convince me for any scrambled purposes, but if fresh is needed I am convinced not only getting fresh organic, but "unwashed" eggs is important. When a chicken lays an egg it is coated with a liquid called the "bloom". The bloom prevents bacteria from getting in, but is usually washed off in any commercial egg production (even organic) in the U.S.

Not long ago I bought several dozen unwashed eggs from a local farmer. I put them in a bowl on my kitchen counter, and used them for about 8 weeks - no refrigeration. They were the best eggs I have ever had - better than cagefree organic I get at the store.



 
okinaw55
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04/15/2014 09:28PM
quote PixiePaddler: "How about fresh eggs straight from the chicken? They don't need refrigeration until they are washed, right? So...if you can keep them from breaking, they should last pretty long. Or am I crazy?"

I hear this is true and this is what we do. I think the key is to make sure they are not refrigerated from chicken to trip. Could be wrong but never gotten sick.
 
nojobro
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04/17/2014 10:37PM
Drrick said what I was going to say (and more).

We have backyard chickens. We do refrigerate our eggs at home, but only because it's our most convenient storage place. We only wash them if they are soiled. (most aren't)

I haven't (yet) taken any to the BW, but when I do, I'll take unwashed, unrefrigerated eggs and probably attach them under the stern seat.
 
Grandma L
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04/19/2014 03:10PM
quote Knoozer: "I use Ova Easy eggs. Best tasting eggs by a long shot. Long shelf life. Bake with them, scramble them up, and no shells."

I also use and like them. We take them mostly on longer travel trips where weight and volume are a concern.

Serve them with dehydrated hash brown potatoes, non-refrigerated bacon bites and cheese. Great pan scramble!
 
Grandma L
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04/19/2014 03:13PM
quote Jaywalker: "I've heard enough convincing feedback about OvaEasy to convince me for any scrambled purposes, but if fresh is needed I am convinced not only getting fresh organic, but "unwashed" eggs is important. When a chicken lays an egg it is coated with a liquid called the "bloom". The bloom prevents bacteria from getting in, but is usually washed off in any commercial egg production (even organic) in the U.S.


Not long ago I bought several dozen unwashed eggs from a local farmer. I put them in a bowl on my kitchen counter, and used them for about 8 weeks - no refrigeration. They were the best eggs I have ever had - better than cagefree organic I get at the store.




"


What about the chicken droppings that carry salmonella that are still on the eggs?
 
billconner
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04/19/2014 03:21PM
quote Grandma L: "quote Jaywalker: "I've heard enough convincing feedback about OvaEasy to convince me for any scrambled purposes, but if fresh is needed I am convinced not only getting fresh organic, but "unwashed" eggs is important. When a chicken lays an egg it is coated with a liquid called the "bloom". The bloom prevents bacteria from getting in, but is usually washed off in any commercial egg production (even organic) in the U.S.



Not long ago I bought several dozen unwashed eggs from a local farmer. I put them in a bowl on my kitchen counter, and used them for about 8 weeks - no refrigeration. They were the best eggs I have ever had - better than cagefree organic I get at the store.




"



What about the chicken droppings that carry salmonella that are still on the eggs?"


I only eat the part inside the shell.
 
Grandma L
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04/19/2014 03:28PM

I only eat the part inside the shell."

Good answer Bill but, after doing egg research, I found that salmonella may be inside the shell as well and since the egg has to touch the shell to get out - It might get contaminated.

The USDA did mention only washing the egg if necessary, since the porous shell may take on bacteria and if you do need to wash them - coat them with oil to replace the cuticle. Center for Food Safety-Eggs
 
Jaywalker
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04/19/2014 07:10PM

I would encourage anyone to do some research and form their own opinion. There is some degree of risk no matter what. You are correct that cracking the egg does potentially expose some of the interior to salmonella bacteria. If one is going to immediately cook the egg, risk is then mitigated. Any bacteria introduced from the exterior to the interior in a moment or so before it hits the skillet will have no time meaningful time to reproduce. I personally also was careful about how I cracked and opened them, and and washed everything after. One could also wash the egg immediately before using if they chose. My eggs already looked very clean, so I did not worry.

When I did my research, what I found interesting is that eggs that are sold in US grocery stores would not be considered legal to sell in the EU/Europe. There they require that grocery store eggs NOT be washed to protect the bloom. The US is among the only countries out there to sell eggs in the refrigerated section. Also, even during the washing processes, it is enirely possible to introduce salmonella to an otherwise healthy egg.

Sanitation is a big part of this. Commercial egg farms, where hens may never touch the ground, see the sky, or eat a bug are I believe more likely to have and transmit salmonella. I bought my eggs from a small producer where the chickens run around outside all day, and each one has a name. The hens were raised in good conditions, and the eggs cost about 1/2 what they cost in the store. Additionally, the yokes were a very bright orange, and the eggs seriously tasted better than any others.

Here are a couple other things anyone interested could consider:
- the USDA found in a 2002 report that 1 in 30,000 eggs in the US had salmonella present (despite washing).
- The CDC recommends eggs be cooked until hard; no easy over, no soft scrambled, no gently poached, or my favorite no soft boiled. Any runny yoke, according to the CDC, represents risk. Personally, no matter what, I like a runny yoke.
- Salmonella can just inside the shell, but inside the egg itself if the hen was sick. In the US, hens are not required to be immunized against salmonella.

The original post was not about general egg safety - it was about how to bring them into the BW/Q. Given that refrigeration is not likely, non-washed eggs are something for people and research and consider, provided you can find a good supplier.

One last thing: i am going to read the link for Center for Food Safety, but i noticed it is from the Government of Hong Kong. I've wandered the market streets of Hong Kong, and if anyone would like to open a new thread on food health and safety there I have photos and am in! (great food though).

 
billconner
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04/19/2014 07:13PM
My aunt and uncle raised chickens and sold eggs for many years - like starting in the 1930s - and they never washed or refrigerated eggs. I guess fear sells but in this case I'm just not buying. Everybody has to make their own decision but I'm not likely to change.
 
Jaywalker
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04/19/2014 07:59PM
Ok, just read the Center for Food Safety-Eggs link, and listed under "main points" it says "Shell eggs need not be washed as any process that wets the shell may facilitate the entry of microorganisms." Given the lack of specificity in this article, I would encourage anyone interested to read more broadly.

I know my proposition about considering unwashed, unrefrigerated eggs is not easy for anyone not use to it. Read broadly is all I can say.
 
Dadov5
 
04/26/2014 08:56PM
We crack em and store them in a Nalgene and freeze them.
 
luckydog
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04/27/2014 01:01PM
I've taken fresh eggs on camping trips many times. Does anyone know a place in Ely to buy fresh, unwashed and unrefrigerated eggs?
 
okinaw55
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05/07/2014 08:31PM
quote billconner: "My aunt and uncle raised chickens and sold eggs for many years - like starting in the 1930s - and they never washed or refrigerated eggs. I guess fear sells but in this case I'm just not buying. Everybody has to make their own decision but I'm not likely to change."

Of course everyone should do what they are comfortable with but I'm with you Bill. Unchilled and unwashed are perfectly safe IMO for a good stretch. I think you hit the nail on the head with fear sells .. I think we all need from time to time to stop and think about how much 'garbage' the media and government is feeding us , pun intended. Again, just my opinion, don't use it as an endorsement. It's up to what you believe and have been told I guess.
 
05/21/2014 08:36PM
When I lived in Germany my host mother bought eggs and stored them in the cupboard. They considered refrigerating eggs barbaric. We used a lot of eggs, so I'm not sure how long they sat around, but for sure at least a few weeks. We never got sick. I feel totally comfortable bringing eggs to the BW for as long as I am willing to haul them around, which is normally just the first or second day. I have been known to bring hard boiled eggs for the first few days too.
 
sirlips
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06/23/2014 04:24PM
very interesting thread.

To be totally honest, the real reason that Americans dont refridgerate their eggs, in the end, is because people are vain about their food here. We didnt like having poop on our egg shells, so we started washing them, when you wash them you remove the coating that protects them, when you remove that coating you must use another method to compensate for the natural method you washed away...that is were the fridge comes in. Since that change to fridging eggs, we have added other reasons, for example our eggs are layed in horrible, mass chicken wearhouses. This leads to a bigger threat of disease spreading. thearfor more need to combat those diseases.

So yes, you must refridgerate your store purchased poop free eggs. No you do not have to refriderate your farm fresh unwashed eggs.

Transporting eggs. We Duct tape 1 Carton per 2 people for each 3 days on a trip under the seat of the Canoe when base camping. We use dried or shelf stable egg beaters when doing loops or not base camping.

The bigger concern should be the Bacon...as you simply can not eat eggs with-out bacon. It is in the constitution, the decleration and also the 3rd chapter of "Everything i need to know i learned in Kindergarten". We freeze the Bacon, wrap in between sheets of dry ice and make sure to bring 10lb per person per day....give or take a bit.

Just remember though, when you eat bacon, it makes you very thirsty....for MORE Bacon.
 
kfisher247
 
08/29/2014 08:29PM
Wrap the carton in my fleece and put that in a dry bag and lash under the canoe seat. Rides through several portages just fine. We always use them for the first breakfast so don't get too concerned about keeping cold.
 
campcook184
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08/31/2014 04:05PM

This is one of my favorite pix of all times.... We told him his job was to protect the eggs...



 
nicek
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08/31/2014 09:58PM
He understands the commitment!!!
Special it is.
 
Dances with Sheep
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09/02/2014 06:43PM
quote jeroldharter: "Ova Easy"

another vote for Ova Easy. I tried them this year and they are awesome.
 
billconner
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09/02/2014 06:54PM
I know some topics need to be repeated but beginning to think the egg carry topic needs a moratorium. I know - I should just not click it. I did love the last photo though.
 
nojobro
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09/03/2014 01:25PM
In a tupperware with packing peanuts was NOT a good idea.
 
Odie
Guest Paddler
 
09/18/2014 08:41PM

This year I stopped trying to keep eggs from cracking and went with Ova Easy eggs. Crystal egg powder that actually taste like real scramble eggs. Add in Hormel bacon bits and Laughing Cow Baby Bell chesse and make a tasty omlet. One packet is 12 eggs.

 
09/23/2014 04:25AM
When I go with a group of 4 or more we carry a BWJ insulated food pack with ice and our fresh meat in it, I freeze Egg Beaters and use them [we like the southwest style best], last Aug when we were up we still had slushy egg beaters after 6 days. FRED
 
belgiancurve22
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03/09/2015 11:57PM
I just put all the ingredients for a omelet eggs and all in a ziplock freeze it then use it up there turns out perfect every time, try it at home you will be sold it's so easy
 
mc2mens
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03/13/2015 02:01PM
I like hard boiled eggs. Boil them before leaving and keep them in the shell. Peel and eat when ready to use.
 
03/15/2015 05:34PM
Duct tape the carton under the rear seat when travelling. Kept with the rest of the food when at camp. The plastic egg carriers need perfectly sized eggs or they can crack from pressure or lack of support.
 
BigCurrent
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03/17/2015 02:01PM
quote Dadov5: "We crack em and store them in a Nalgene and freeze them. "

Ditto. This works great, but we crack them the night before we go in and they stay in the fridge overnight and then get carried in via the small soft-sided cooler we bring.

This year we are going to try powdered eggs. We used to use the Wakefield brand but I can't find it anymore. Just ordered some Augason Farms, fingers crossed they're at least edible. This will allow saving some weight and having eggs most mornings.
 
billconner
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03/17/2015 05:58PM
Medium eggs, cardboard carton, wrap in two layers of (small) bubble wrap, bdb, top of pack. Never a broken egg, over easy at end of week even.
 
schweady
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03/17/2015 07:15PM
Nothing beats it on that first morning in the wilderness.

Oh, man... pun definitely not intended...


 
openwide
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04/05/2015 05:52AM
quote Knoozer: "I use Ova Easy eggs. Best tasting eggs by a long shot. Long shelf life. Bake with them, scramble them up, and no shells."

+1 these worked great for my group of 5 last may.. cheap to and tasted better then dehydrated
 
nojobro
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04/30/2015 12:59PM
quote OldFingers57: " We also used different sizes of Tupperware containers or old protein powder containers with the eggs wrapped in paper towels. "

I did that and broke eggs. (well, actually, it was tupperware + packing peanuts, but the peanuts ended up being the cornstarch ones and so once one egg broke, it melted the peanuts...)

I'm thinking I'll try foam egg cartons taped under the seat next time....or would cardboard be better?
 
Spartan1
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04/30/2015 03:47PM
quote nojobro:

I'm thinking I'll try foam egg cartons taped under the seat next time....or would cardboard be better?"


We have always used the paper cartons. Not sure how the foam cartons would work.

S1
 
04/30/2015 04:46PM
Foam gives you resistance to the elements and/or cracked egg moisture. Cardboard is damaged by moisture but you can burn it when you're done with it....

We use cardboard cartons taped to the seat.
 
Goldenbadger
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05/15/2015 05:55AM
I carried them in their cardboard carton with a little bubble wrap stuffed inside with the eggs. Then I placed them on top of everything else in the blue barrel. They were cradled by other stuff on. Not a single broken egg.
Also, as previous posts in this thread mentioned, I got them farm fresh and did not wash them prior to taking them. I have a friend who has the chickens, so I was able to pick and choose the eggs with no poo on them. I washed them right before we cracked them open to cook. There's nothing like fresh eggs and bacon while camping. I buy the shelf stable bacon, so we have several breakfasts of bacon and eggs.
 
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