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mfl1776
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
03/25/2018 07:07PM
I know this is an oft-discussed topic but I just wanted to get some feedback. Trying to pack light this go-round.

Am I crazy to pack this minimalist for a mid-July trip? I don't mind being dirty and stinky. We'll only be out there for 4 days and some change.

One pair quick dry convertible pants (wearing)
One long sleeve poly/climacool t-shirt (wearing)
Long john bottoms for sleeping
Smartwool socks x 3 or 4 (for wet footing and for camp/sleeping - 3/4 might seem excessive but with wetfooting, especially on long paddling days, I've found in the past that socks don't dry fast enough for the next day).
Fleece jacket
Rain gear
Underwear x2 (incl. the pair I'll be wearing)
Cotton t-shirt for sleeping (I know..."cotton kills", but it's much more comfortable for sleeping)
Knit cap
Bill cap
Merrell Water Shoes
Crocs (for camp)
Bandanna (neck protection and many other uses)

Thanks in advance for weighing in.
 
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SPOTPRES1
member (16)member
 
03/25/2018 07:58PM
Hello! I am curious what kind of rain gear you are using? I also want to go as light as possible obviously and I seen that frogg toggs has a light weight rain gear set that is 10 oz. for the jacket and bottoms yikes that's light and sounds great for this trip have you ever used frogg toggs?
03/25/2018 08:13PM
No, you're not crazy, although I've never been in mid-July. I've taken almost the same for early Sept. trips. Three pair of socks is enough - one pair to wetfoot, one pair around camp, one for sleep.
03/25/2018 08:49PM
I'd only add that it's important to make sure there are enough "core-warming" layers. If it rains, even in mid-July, the temperatures could drop or the wind could pick up with the rain and result in hyperthermic conditions. It's just something to always guard against.
cyclones30
distinguished member(1753)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2018 08:51PM
I think you're good. Personally I'd drop the long johns for something like gym shorts for around camp and sleeping in, but to each their own.

I think you'll be warm enough if you basically put everything you have on under your rain gear for the "surprise cold" spell that may or may not happen while you're up there.
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1934)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2018 08:57PM
Not crazy. I've brought about that for July/August trips, and ended up not even using half of it. Just make sure there are no freak cold fronts.
mfl1776
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
03/25/2018 08:59PM
SPOTPRES1 - I have the heavier Frogg Toggs. I looked at replacing them with the lightweight kind but they are really effective at keeping the water out (I didn't need them when I was up there two years ago but I tested them by walking outside in them when we had the tail end of a hurricane come through our part of NC that same year. I was dry as a bone and that was some heavy rain!)

I think I'll stick with the ones I have. Plus, as someone else noted in this thread, they can be used as an outer shell/warming layer if a cold snap hits. Not sure the lightweight kind would be quite as effective in that case. They are somewhat bulky - especially when compared to the sparsity of other clothing I'm bringing - but I got the $5 stuff sack Frogg Toggs sells and they smush down real nice inside it. So not really a problem in terms of taking up too much pack space.
sedges
distinguished member (453)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2018 09:59PM
Do do mostly mid-June trips and always need to be prepared for a cold wet windy stretch. Last trip I had temps dip into the 30s. Mid-July should be more stable, but it is still possible to get a cold snap.

When going light in the summer I deal with that by making sure that if I layered everything I had in the pack including rain gear it will keep me warm into the 30s.
campnfish
distinguished member (207)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2018 10:45PM
Fleece jacket in july seems excessive, and bulky, September i would say bring it, not july. I would ditch the long underwear bottoms and bring a long underwear top and a long sleeve shirt to double up in place of fleece, save some room. 3 pair of socks works great in the fall, in july socks dry fast, so i would never bring more than 3, one for wetfoot, one for not, and i leave a pair in my hammock.
Banksiana
distinguished member(1928)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 12:43AM
mfl1776: "
Smartwool socks x 3 or 4 (for wet footing and for camp/sleeping - 3/4 might seem excessive but with wetfooting, especially on long paddling days, I've found in the past that socks don't dry fast enough for the next day).
"


If you're wet footing just put on wet or damp socks when traveling, they'll be wet soon enough. Also for a four day trip your forecast, especially temperatures will be fairly accurate, pack for the conditions predicted.
03/26/2018 06:16AM
You may find this information useful:
Intellicast Ely historic averages
OldFingers57
distinguished member(4998)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/26/2018 07:10AM
What you plan to take seems to me to be spot on. As others have said you should have enough clothing that if it got cold you could put it all on and stay warm.
bposteve
distinguished member (146)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 08:03AM
I think your list looks pretty good, darn near what I bring for a mid-summer trip. Only thing I do differently is I bring a Patagonia nano-puff instead of a fleece jacket. It is lighter, warmer, smaller, and also makes a nice pillow.

I generally just bring one spare set of socks. One pair may never be dry and I'm ok with that, the other pair is for when I'm done with the canoe and want dry feet in camp.
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12774)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/26/2018 08:43AM
One trip on the first week of June is was cool for the time of year. I ended up wearing my PFD for warmth. I think a fleece hoodie or jacket is worth taking. You can also use it as a pillow. Your clothes list looks good.
murphylakejim
distinguished member(611)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 08:45AM
campnfish: "Fleece jacket in july seems excessive, and bulky, September i would say bring it, not july. I would ditch the long underwear bottoms and bring a long underwear top and a long sleeve shirt to double up in place of fleece, save some room. 3 pair of socks works great in the fall, in july socks dry fast, so i would never bring more than 3, one for wetfoot, one for not, and i leave a pair in my hammock. "

+1
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1874)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 08:58AM
A little excessive for my liking but maybe my definition of dirty and stinky is different than yours.
salukiguy
distinguished member(515)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 12:35PM
I think I would substitute the long Johns for another pair of pants of your choice. That way if your other pair gets caught on something and rips you have a spare or your other pair gets wet or nasty. Then again I always sleep in underwear and would not be comfortable sleeping in long johns and a shirt.
SevenofNine
distinguished member(2335)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 12:44PM
Remove the long johns at your own peril is what I say. I wouldn't do it. I had a coworker leave a mid July trip because it was unseasonably cold and his wife was miserable.

You could replace the fleece jacket with a mid weight fleece long john or a light weight down coat like an Eddie Bauer Microtherm jacket with hood. My down jacket with hood (I've used the hood before on trips) is so light and packs small that it's silly to leave it behind but I don't take trips in July.

I bring a balaclava in place of a knit hat. I prefer being able to cover my face if it is windy and cold.

Also if you are willing to have a wet pair of pants and only a long john with rain pant as a replacement then go for it. Quick dry pants weigh so little that it's worth it to me to have a spare pair. To each his own.

Question, do you have any gloves or liner gloves you bring? I didn't see it on your list.

Have a great trip!

thebotanyguy
distinguished member(749)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2018 12:44PM
I would add a pair of leather gloves. My preference is for deerskin gloves as they do not get stiff after being wet and then dried.

You wouldn't necessarily need gloves for warmth, although they will supply that if unexpected cold and wet happens. The leather gloves are useful for wood gathering, pulling on a rope, or picking up hot pots and pans.

03/26/2018 03:54PM
Long Johns, fleece for me no matter what time of year. Got snowed on in July many years ago..... I do not trust Mother Nature in the North Woods.
03/26/2018 06:48PM
campnfish: "Fleece jacket in july seems excessive, and bulky, September i would say bring it, not july. I would ditch the long underwear bottoms and bring a long underwear top and a long sleeve shirt to double up in place of fleece, save some room. 3 pair of socks works great in the fall, in july socks dry fast, so i would never bring more than 3, one for wetfoot, one for not, and i leave a pair in my hammock. "

+1 I was going to post a similar comment but, you covered it. Fleece is bulky and relatively heavy. Use a short sleeve plus long sleeve shirt plus rain gear if it happens to be unseasonably cold. It’s 4 days, watch the weather forecast and leave it behind.
schweady
distinguished member(6663)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/26/2018 07:00PM
Good direction on the list. Looks a lot like my own, altho I'll bring 2 synthetic/wicking t-shirts (wear one, pack one) and switch each day. I never could sleep with a shirt on, so no food prep odor worries. I've finally learned to bring a bandana, if only to have some cotton for wiping my glasses.

A microfleece, like my Wintergreen full-zip hoodie is definitely not bulky and has been with me on a dozen or more summer trips, no matter the month. That, and my fleece winter beanie, are often welcome layers on chilly summer nights.
Bulldogge62
member (48)member
 
03/26/2018 09:28PM
AmarilloJim: "A little excessive for my liking but maybe my definition of dirty and stinky is different than yours." 2 pair of underwear for a trip less than week is excessive for me. We're going for 14 days in September and I'm bringing 2 pair.
03/26/2018 10:06PM
Almost exactly what I take. 3 wool socks.....the one pair goes on wet in the morning and gets wet soon again. I do take 2 pairs of Polypro socks for under the wool ones. Lightweight fleece....yes. long John bottoms .....maybe for June or later August. They are handy if it gets cool at night and your pants got wet from days travel. Pretty good list.
03/27/2018 03:06AM
I'd bring a second pair of pants. Getting to camp cold and wet they and the long johns could come in handy. I remember having to cover my tomatoes on July 4th one year. Be careful about temps in July. The good news is only four days and you can get a pretty accurate weather forecast right before you leave and adjust from there.
overthehill
distinguished member(4390)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/27/2018 04:34AM
Cowdoc's socks,microfleece, and I like THIN LAYERS that can be adjusted at any time. Remember to hang stuff up to dry at every sunny opportunity.
mastertangler
distinguished member(6169)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/27/2018 05:56AM
You need dedicated sleeping clothing for the sleeping bag in order not to get it filthy. I use a set of silk underwear for that purpose. Extremely light and packs tiny.

You also should always have a down type jacket. Mine packs to the size of two fists.

I am no fan of Frogg Toggs. But whatever you decide on it needs be bullet proof.

One pair of pants (Railriders) and one pair of shorts.

I am a huge fan of Under Armour heat max underwear which I often wear in camp getting out of my pants which are often wet and dirty. They are rather pricey but very comfortable and when it does get cold they are astonishingly effective. Go very large on the bottoms if you pull the trigger. Do not order these on line but rather keep trying them on in store or you will be sorry as your normal size will be to tight.

I am also quite fond of fleece fingerless gloves. I tend to sleep with them on and in the morning mosquito onslaught they offer excellent protection while still able to do all the normal tasks.

Here I am wearing Under Armour Heat Gear and Original bug suit which is a fine all purpose garment. The beanie is North Face, another article of clothing I wouldn't go without. Socks are Darn tough and the shoes are Astral Brewer's kayaking shoe (the ultimate camp shoe).


mfl1776
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
03/27/2018 09:17AM
Banksiana: "mfl1776: "
Smartwool socks x 3 or 4 (for wet footing and for camp/sleeping - 3/4 might seem excessive but with wetfooting, especially on long paddling days, I've found in the past that socks don't dry fast enough for the next day).
"



If you're wet footing just put on wet or damp socks when traveling, they'll be wet soon enough. Also for a four day trip your forecast, especially temperatures will be fairly accurate, pack for the conditions predicted."


You're right - your feet do get wet pretty quick. I guess I didn't care for the feeling of putting on wet socks first thing in the morning. But to save space it's probably worth it.
mfl1776
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
03/27/2018 09:22AM
SevenofNine: "Remove the long johns at your own peril is what I say. I wouldn't do it. I had a coworker leave a mid July trip because it was unseasonably cold and his wife was miserable.


You could replace the fleece jacket with a mid weight fleece long john or a light weight down coat like an Eddie Bauer Microtherm jacket with hood. My down jacket with hood (I've used the hood before on trips) is so light and packs small that it's silly to leave it behind but I don't take trips in July.


I bring a balaclava in place of a knit hat. I prefer being able to cover my face if it is windy and cold.


Also if you are willing to have a wet pair of pants and only a long john with rain pant as a replacement then go for it. Quick dry pants weigh so little that it's worth it to me to have a spare pair. To each his own.


Question, do you have any gloves or liner gloves you bring? I didn't see it on your list.


Have a great trip!


"


Yes, I will have work-type gloves that can be used for warmth as well.
mfl1776
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
03/27/2018 09:23AM
Thanks for the great input, everyone! Lots of smart ideas in these posts. Probably going to pack the extra pair of quick dry pants considering my single pair was growing algae by day three. I'll stick with the Columbia zip up fleece jacket despite warnings that it might be excessive b/c I am cold natured and would prefer to have it on a nippy evening. We went late June two years ago and I wore it quite a bit.

Will also make sure I pack gloves - probably work-type gloves to double as camp-duty and warmth. And will look into a pair of better quality of long johns - probably lighter weight.

As to my final item on the list - the bandanna - I highly recommend it to anyone who doesn't already carry at least one. This is something I picked up from the bushcraft crowd. I wore it around my neck the whole trip and used it for a million different things. (Plus it makes me feel like a tough guy when I wear it bandit style over the mouth.) And a clean one can be used for first aid purposes if things take a nasty turn. I'm a first aid instructor and one of the videos we use from the American Heart Association shows the guy using about three bandanas to secure a splint. But three is probably excessive.
03/27/2018 11:56AM
One other thing that I have found very useful for the weight/bulk is a [UV/insect shield] "buff".
SevenofNine
distinguished member(2335)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/27/2018 05:04PM
I think your quote about being cold natured says it all about taking your fleece jacket. It’s hardly excessive once you need it!

If looking for new long johns I would consider merino wool from Minus 33. I have no data to back up this statement but I think wool pound for pound is warmer than synthetics.
03/28/2018 12:59AM
I guess I am in the minority but instead of long johns I take a pair of fleece lined nylon "wind" pants, my sons used to wear them for spring and fall soccer warm ups. They weigh almost nothing pack really small, are wind proof and are warm, but the best thing I like about them is my pants slide in them, no binding. FRED
OldFingers57
distinguished member(4998)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
03/28/2018 06:03AM
It's better to have items to keep you warm like the fleece jacket than to not have them and wish you did while trying to prevent getting hypothermic. Remember more cases of hypothermia occur in non winter conditions then in winter.
mags459
member (10)member
 
04/19/2018 02:42PM
Great list and mine is almost the same but 1 pair of spare socks, smart wool t shirt, and i use an eddie bauer package down jacket rather than a fleece. This is my list for June July or August.

Mags
treehorn
distinguished member (452)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/19/2018 03:22PM
I know forecasts are far from gospel, but the day before your trip, pull up a forecast and adjust as needed. It doesn't need to be precise to get a good idea of general highs/lows.

Personally, I like clean underwear - I always overpack on that.
jfinn
distinguished member (163)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/19/2018 04:21PM
I count grams, you are close to me on a list.

#1 Forcast can suck. Be prepared to suffer or not. Your choice if dropping equipment based on forecast.

Many have chimed in......I would ask, long johns of synthetic material? I use some poly pro's that come in under 8oz for top and bottom total. Sometimes they are used and sometimes not. Rolled up and tucked into sleep gear.

Fleece jackets are heavy. I am cold in the AM, almost year round. I like a 100 wt fleece pullover and a lightweight puffy. I have used the puffy on most tips...including June and Aug. 8.7 oz for pure comfort on those not so steamy mornings. I've got a few pics of my girls over the years in their puffys. They only trip in summer.

2-3 pair of socks-
1 wool for wet footing (1 they will get wet, sucks to put on, but then it doesn't)
1 pair simple lightweight running socks for camp or two if I think it might rain and keep a pair with my sleeping gear.

I would not bring extra pants. I bring a light pair of shorts as a second "pant"

04/19/2018 05:33PM
I would add a light weight long underwear top (Helly Hensen is great), light weight camp pants and shirt ( dry after paddling is nice to have) Loss a pair of socks and the fleece jacket ( substitute it with a light fleece pull over) It's foolish to think July will be always be nice and cozy. I've been there when it barely got in the 50s during the day. Everything else looks great.
04/19/2018 09:23PM
I am also a UL backpacker so am pretty minimalist...but I also do not ever want to be cold if I can layer to avoid it.

Part of this depends on your sleep system. If you have a nice pad and quilt/bag and do not need to add any warmth from clothing, then OK...but if there is a chance you would want to augment your sleep system, well...factor that in!

And the one situation I - personally - might want one more layer for...hanging out in the evening when the temperature drops. Everyone is different, but for a couple hours with temps in the 40's or 50's in the evening where I am not moving, I need my rain gear, a fleece layer (top & bottom), possibly a puffy jacket and a base layer. And a fleece hat. For sure a hat! And a hot cider + 151.

I am indeed a man most wimpy.
mastertangler
distinguished member(6169)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/20/2018 06:58AM
Sns, wimpy?

I think not! Well, maybe just a bit. Like you, I don't do cold real well. I used to clean my ice fishing hole with bare hands but now I need a wee little sweater in the movie theatre. Brrrrrr.

Probably has something to do with living in Florida during the winter months.

I'm with you, a knit watchmans hat is a must have article, I also like fleece fingerless gloves.
Bushman
distinguished member (166)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/20/2018 08:12AM
Never trust a forecast. Only job I know where you can be wrong most of the time and still keep it.

I once did a fly in to North Ontario with a forecast of 74-80 degrees all week, no rain in the second week of August.
It was 90+ the first two days and by the end it was rain, fog and 55 degrees.

I am hitting the BW same time frame, August 12 and I am bringing a swimsuit and a hoodie but no long johns. Like others have said I will use long pants and rain gear if it gets that cold. Bandannas are the best from face protection, hat, to forgetting TP.

Convertible pants are great and this year I am trying the bug free shirts. We will see.
I will try them out at home and most likely soak them in permethrin anyways.
I am also bringing a head net for skeeter portages. Lightweight leather gloves for fire-wooding and general camp stuff.

I've been using Frogg Toggs for several years. They aren't the best but they have gotten me through several days worth of rain. I do tend to get wet at the waist and on top of the thighs where my hands sit. I will replace them eventually, just have a few other things taking priority as far as gear goes.
mutz
distinguished member(1314)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/20/2018 09:22AM
The one thing I don’t skimp on is my sleeping bag. I have the newer military system, and with the outer bag I can easily sleep in my underwear and remain warm in twenty degree weather. I just can’t sleep bundled up in long underwear, down jackets, heavy socks etc. I use silk long underwear if it’s cool in the evenings, very warm and absolutely no weight. I am guilty though of packing a bit of extra clothing, if it’s wet and cold I want to be dry. I don’t mind being a bit cold, but if I am wet and cold I am miserable and if I’m miserable I am not having fun, if I’m not having fun, I’m going home.
Bumstead
distinguished member (304)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/24/2018 08:31AM
Besides wearing a pair of pants, socks, underwear, t-shirt, long sleeve, and rubber boots on the way in, this is what I pack...and it'd be close to the same for a June - September trip of 5 - 7 days:

2 pairs wool socks
2 pairs underwear
1 long sleeve
2 cotton t-shirts
2 polyester hoodies
1 pair pants
1 pair thin long john pants
1 pair shorts
1 pair sleeping pants
1 stocking hat
1 baseball cap
1 pair of light gloves
rain pants and jacket.
1 pair trail running shoes
head net
20° synthetic mummy bag either used as a quilt or zipped up if into the lower 40°'s or below


If it'd be very cold going on entry day, I'd wear one of the hoodies I have along. Rain gear and hats in my small day pack, extra shoes packed in one of the main packs, the other clothing easily fits into a 15 - 18L dry bag, compresses down, and goes in one of the main packs. The sleeping pants, one t-shirt, one pair socks, and one hoodie always remaining in the tent and dry for comfort at night. With t-shirt, long sleeve, hoodie, rain jacket....long johns, pants, rain pants and stocking hat all together, I could be comfortable into the 20°'s if needed.

Extremely nice forecast might make for a couple less pieces.
x2jmorris
distinguished member(810)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/24/2018 08:54AM
I'd ditch the fleece and long underwear. I would add swim shorts though.
rdricker
senior member (96)senior membersenior member
 
04/24/2018 09:58PM
Been in the Q twice now...once in June and once in July. First time in a tent, second time in a hammock. I packed the same both times and was happy with it, below is my list. Everything fit in a 30 liter dry bag (including the hammock the second time.

2 - switchback pants/shorts (one wet, one dry for camp)
2 - synthetic t-shirts (one day, one camp)
1 - long sleeve synthetic shirt (Columbia are the best)
1 - lightweight full zip fleece (used a North Face)
1 - lightweight rain jacket (Columbia)
2 - pair of synthetic underwear
1 - nylon jogging shorts (I sleep in them without underwear....double as swimwear if you want.
2 - pair of synthetic boot socks
1 - set of synthetic long underwear (never used it)
1 - pair of crocs (wear around camp to let feet dry and stay dry)
1 - bandana
1 - mosquito head net (I think Sea to Summit is the best)
1 - inflatable sleeping pad (Sea to summit)(need for tent and used in hammock to keep mosquitos from biting through)
1 - 30 degree F sleeping bag (Used a North Face coated down last time and liked it)
1 - inflatable pillow (Sea to Summit)

This was all that I took and felt that it was plenty.

MarshallPrime
distinguished member (306)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/25/2018 09:34AM
One thing I will do is use my small compression bag and in it place my under armor long sleeve top, my long under ware and a pair of warm/wool socks. Then compress it all the way down to not much bigger than a can of pop, maybe small shoe size if I add something else to it.

This bag almost NEVER gets used except 3 trips ago (June 10th I think) it was cold and a guy slipped into the water on a portage so when we got to camp he wore my stuff until his dried out in a couple days. He was pretty cold.

The list looks solid to me.

I also use my rain jacket as a outer laying in the mornings/evenings so I can cut down one long sleeve item. Also helps with bugs, which never seem as bad once we leave the outfitters.

I have never used gloves on my trips. EVER. I take them when I remember but for me they just dont get used.

Abbey
distinguished member (177)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/25/2018 10:03PM
Similar list, but add a second pair of convertible pants as backup for rips, and I prefer a soft shell (grabs less vegetation) to a fleece.

I know some (most?) disagree, but I just wear Chacos in the canoe and wet foot anytime between Memorial Day and Labor Day. One pair of warm socks go under the Chacos in the evening, and one pair of thin liner socks in case I need a bug layer.
10/15/2018 08:54AM
Confess I didn't read this thread really closely, but one comment.

We always took silk long underwear for sleeping. WinterSilks lightweight long johns and either mockneck or turtle. Very, very lightweight, packs into almost nothing. Warm enough for summer, June and September. Feels very good in a sleeping bag, and doesn't stink either.

Wool socks an absolute must any time of year. I wouldn't wear anything else in my 'real life' either. :-)
2NDpaddlers
member (25)member
 
10/22/2018 02:41PM
My wife and I have the All Sport Frogg Toggs rain gear, not the super light weight ones you are talking, but have the stuff sack and they pack down really nice. We paddled the whole day in the rain and they kept us dry. They worked great for us.
scotttimm
distinguished member (195)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/23/2018 10:08AM
nctry: "I'd bring a second pair of pants. Getting to camp cold and wet they and the long johns could come in handy. I remember having to cover my tomatoes on July 4th one year. Be careful about temps in July. The good news is only four days and you can get a pretty accurate weather forecast right before you leave and adjust from there."
+1 - I bring along a pair of cheap track-type pants for wearing around camp if not raining or in bed if it is cold. If your pants get soaked (you fall in the water, get caught in the rain, etc) then you are stuck walking around in long underwear with little wind protection. They weigh next to nothing and sure are comfortable around camp. I found a lightweight, super packable thin down coat that stuffs into a bag smaller than a water bottle with same weight as fleece - $19 at COSTCO. That coat gets me through the fall here in NE Iowa and usually overkill in the BWCA.

And I agree with the three pair of socks reccomendations.

We had record highs in mid-July on our trip this past summer. It must have hit 90 a couple of days, had to cool off in the water. I wore shorts the whole time.
CCBBSpeckled
Guest Paddler
 
10/23/2018 04:57PM
Seems about right to me.
HowardSprague
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10/24/2018 12:34PM
sounds pretty much perfect to me; I do also bring another t-shirt to wear in camp, and maybe even an old flannel shirt, but very similar list as yours.
10/25/2018 11:54AM
I'd ditch the second pair of undies, knit hat, long john bottoms and fleece jacket and add a a long sleeve shirt (maybe the top that goes with the bottoms I'd leave behind?). I'd go with 3 pair of socks, but you'd probably be able to get by with 2. Other than that, it's what I would take.

If you need extra warmth, you can take a 30 degree bag instead of a 40.
Captn Tony
distinguished member(1370)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/27/2018 06:44AM
Make sure you check the forecast before going in. I didn't pack enough clothes for a cold rainy trip in the middle of July. Was hypothermic for 2 days.
It got down to the low 40s at night and low 50s during the day. I always pack 2 sets of clothes and a least one set of warm clothes. Also it your rain gear is new make sure it sheds water. I put it on and go stand in the shower to check it out.
10/28/2018 06:43AM
I'd take 3 pair of good quality wool socks. Keep one pair dry for around camp and sleeping if need be. Rotate the other two for wetfooting. One thing I would add is a good down vest. It packs small and weighs near nothing but it comes in handy if the temp drops.

This one is priced right for its quality. If dedicated to using only for trips it will last a lifetime. Comes with a stuff sack. Patagonia down vest

Check out the reviews.

 
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