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  Last Visit: 02/28/2021 04:43AM

Entry Point 25 - Moose Lake

Moose Lake entry point allows overnight paddle or motor (25 HP max). This entry point is supported by Kawishiwi Ranger Station near the city of Ely, MN. The distance from ranger station to entry point is 21 miles. Access is an boat landing or canoe launch at Moose Lake. Many trip options for paddlers with additional portages. This area was affected by blowdown in 1999.

Number of Permits per Day: 27
Elevation: 1356 feet
Latitude: 47.9877
Longitude: -91.4997
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rockstaranon
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06/25/2010 05:51PM
 
New Trip Report posted by rockstaranon

Trip Name: Appeasing the fish gods.

Entry Point: 25

Click Here to View Trip Report


Some of the pictures don't show up on thumbnails but if you click the icon you can see them.

"The fish and I were both stunned and disbelieving to find ourselves connected by a line." - William Humphrey
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boonie
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06/25/2010 09:36PM
 
Thanks for the trip report.
That first campsite on Ensign looks like a dandy. A lot of people don't want to carry everything up to the elevated ones, but I like the views. Sounds like you had a real enjoyable trip with your friends.
fishguts
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06/25/2010 10:24PM
 
Nice report and good pictures....I don't know why some don't show up..?

fishguts
bobby726
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06/28/2010 05:43PM
 
Dang, nice report. Very detailed. Almost felt like I was there. I may have been inclined to dump the 3rd guy into the lake for the trifecta.

Always be the second one in the outhouse, it's going to smell anyway so you might as well have a warm seat.
rockstaranon
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06/30/2010 02:48PM
 
quote bobby726: I may have been inclined to dump the 3rd guy into the lake for the trifecta. "


We seriously considered pushing him into the lake when he was shore fishing one day, just so he knew how it felt, but we decided to be nice :)

"The fish and I were both stunned and disbelieving to find ourselves connected by a line." - William Humphrey
TuscaroraBorealis
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07/01/2010 01:17PM
 
Great report! Nice photos.


Nice to hear the full story. I was in the group you camped near on Disappointment. I must say you drew the respect of our crew. Staying above water, paddling solo with that wind & wave overload was impressive.


Until hearing it from you, We had no idea that bear was in our camp. Nothing had been disturbed and there was no sign he had been there. Glad to hear he left you alone as well. I think you built up enough karma (to avoid bear trouble) for both our groups paddling in that wind?
imcold
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07/27/2010 09:54AM
 
Great Report and photos.
I have to agree with you 2 years ago I tried to go solo in a canoe while my 2 partners shared a canoe. I disliked the way it paddled so much that I bought a kayak. That I like 100 times better but now I have to retool in order to fit my gear in my new ride.

I did not tip it
Koda
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07/27/2010 12:38PM
 
Nice trip report - it was a fun read.


You were paddling a MorningStar, which is the same length as the RockStar but 4" wider at the waterline. That makes it a lot slower and of course harder to paddle into a headwind. Next time get a true solo boat and you'll have a better experience.


You mentioned something that made me scratch my head - that the bow person is first in and last out. Seems to me that the boat is more stable if the stern is in first and out last. Does that make sense to you?


Anyway, thanks for the report.
rockstaranon
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07/27/2010 02:11PM
 
Thanks Koda and imcold. Really appreciate the feedback.


@Koda: I spent 5 summers when I was younger attending a camp outside of Ely, I also worked as a canoe instructor at the same camp a couple years ago, all my canoe experience stems from what I learned there. I was taught that the bow is always first in and last out because the bow is closer to the center of the canoe, thus having more stability. If the bowman exits a canoe first, then the stern is left exiting the canoe with the bow at an angle, and the same if the bowman enters after the stern. Another rule I live by when paddling together is that you never paddle on the same side. I have watched a number of times where a pair of canoers are paddling hard through a headwind and three sharp strokes on the same side of the canoe dumps it. Not to say this is the case every time, but again, it was how I learned. I know many will disagree with probably both of these, but it was drilled into me for so long that I live by it, and teach my canoe mates the same.


I really loved your trip report for your 10 day solo and I must say your picture of the Jitterbug portage helped me locate it when we were out there, much appreciated. And thanks for the clarification on the the canoe name, I couldn't quite remember the name after I dropped it off, just that it had "Star" in there somewhere.

"The fish and I were both stunned and disbelieving to find ourselves connected by a line." - William Humphrey
Koda
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07/27/2010 04:07PM
 
quote rockstaranon: "Thanks Koda and imcold. Really appreciate the feedback.

@Koda: I spent 5 summers when I was younger attending a camp outside of Ely, I also worked as a canoe instructor at the same camp a couple years ago, all my canoe experience stems from what I learned there. I was taught that the bow is always first in and last out because the bow is closer to the center of the canoe, thus having more stability. If the bowman exits a canoe first, then the stern is left exiting the canoe with the bow at an angle, and the same if the bowman enters after the stern.


You're correct that the bow paddling station is closer to the center of the boat. But the stern paddler can move forward toward the middle and provide greater stability. However, as I think about it, I can see that may be true with an unloaded boat, but not one that's filled with packs. Uh oh ... I think I just learned something.

Another rule I live by when paddling together is that you never paddle on the same side. I have watched a number of times where a pair of canoers are paddling hard through a headwind and three sharp strokes on the same side of the canoe dumps it. Not to say this is the case every time, but again, it was how I learned. I know many will disagree with probably both of these, but it was drilled into me for so long that I live by it, and teach my canoe mates the same.

IMO you got it right. Paddling on the same side is a great way to rock the boat, especially if the paddlers use the "lifting water" version of the forward stroke.

I really loved your trip report for your 10 day solo and I must say your picture of the Jitterbug portage helped me locate it when we were out there, much appreciated. And thanks for the clarification on the the canoe name, I couldn't quite remember the name after I dropped it off, just that it had "Star" in there somewhere."

Thanks, I'm glad it helped someone.
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