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      Trip Report - First Solo: Sawbill loop up to Cherokee and back down through Temperance. September 2016.
 
  Last Visit: 02/27/2021 12:51PM

Entry Point 38 - Sawbill Lake

Sawbill Lake entry point allows overnight paddle only. This entry point is supported by Tofte Ranger Station near the city of Tofte, MN. The distance from ranger station to entry point is 25 miles. Access is a boat landing at Sawbill Lake. This area was affected by blowdown in 1999.

Number of Permits per Day: 14
Elevation: 1802 feet
Latitude: 47.8699
Longitude: -90.8858
Author Message Text
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/11/2016 06:39AM
 
New Trip Report posted by movington

Trip Name: First Solo: Sawbill loop up to Cherokee and back down through Temperance. September 2016. .

Entry Point: 38

Click Here to View Trip Report
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mastertangler
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09/11/2016 08:26AM
 
That was good, I enjoyed it very much and brought back some of the very same feelings I had on my first solo. Thanks!

Lets Go!
MagicPaddler
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09/11/2016 10:17AM
 

There is still hope for you to double portage. I am 70 and I double portage. Thanks for taking the time to post the report. Print out your report and put it in a loose leaf note book. Eventually you will have a nice collection.


The question of the day is Freedom or Socialism?? MagicPaddler
pswith5
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09/11/2016 06:17PM
 
Hey,movington. It was nice meeting you. Nice trip report. I also triple portaged. I am surprised i did not run into you again. I got to jack about the time you were leaving. I even checked out the site you stayed on. Thinking maybe someone left some firewood. Also was in two harbors around 11 Thursday. We will have to get a raincheck on lunch. Maybe we can do a "group" solo together.? It sounds like we have similar abilities. Age also similar. Let's keep in touch.

Without the bad times, the good times wouldn't seem so good.
NotSoFast
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/11/2016 06:27PM
 
If you get some clear ideas on how you're going to shave off gear weight, please post them. I've always double portaged when solo, even when young (now I'm 55). I've been trying to cut out gear I seldom use and still can't get down to single portaging, but at least have easier doubles. Thanks for the report.
cowdoc
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/11/2016 07:06PM
 
So, you experienced the most relaxing AND the most terrifying times in your life in the same day. That is what they call adventure. It was nice to see that as days progressed, your mind kept thinking less of schedules and "what ifs" and instead you saw, heard and felt your surroundings more. Nice report.

"What could happen?"
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/12/2016 01:23PM
 
Thanks, everyone. I appreciate the nice comments. Especially since this is the first trip report I've ever done. I'm glad you liked it.
ducks
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09/12/2016 08:44PM
 
Nice report. Thanks for sharing. I feel it's so much easier to be flexible and adjust on the fly when going solo. Also, from my first solo to my 3rd solo I was able to cut down a lot of weight and stuff. I went from double portaging to single portaging. 1st solo I had 1 40 lb pack and 1 30 lb pack and a 40lb canoe. 3rd solo I had 1 45 lb pack and a 30 lb canoe.

Ride EZ
Bannock
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/12/2016 11:52PM
 
Nice! It's one of my top 5 solo routes. 5 days is perfect for that route. Also, I think the Vagabond is a nice boat for that route. Sounds like you learned a lot.

Bannock
missmolly
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/14/2016 09:41AM
 
As a professional storyteller, I say, "Hey, you tell a good yarn!"


I'm returning to northwestern Ontario next June, but I'm taking armor. The storms up there are bigger and badder and more dangerous than they used to be, so I bought a Nissan Xterra Pro4X and I'll sleep in that. Your tale of the most frightening moment of your life is a story I'm reading more and more. Of course, people died in the BWWCA this year because of the storms that are now occurring. So, it'll be great to have an elevated, insulated steel box for sleeping and the Xterra's back folds flat and the passenger side front seat also collapses, giving me about nine feet of level pad. I've outfitted it with mosquito netting too, so I'll have a breeze.

I will paddle eternal, Kevlar and carbon.
Jim1955
membermember
 
09/15/2016 05:31AM
 
Thank you, I enjoyed your report very much. I'm planning my first BWCA solo for next summer. It's been years since I soloed into the wilderness. (To many to mention). But yet over the years of working and raising a family the call has always been there. As yourself, I find this site to be a valued resource and read everything I can related to the BWCA.

In wilderness is the preservation of the world. - Henry David Thoreau BWCA/Quetico Forever
hooky
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/15/2016 11:39AM
 
We saw you portage out Tuesday morning. We were on #890 right there on the point across from the portage. You're the only guy we saw leave the lake that day and one group came in. Monday, we saw 2 groups leave the lake and one group come in. We probably paddled past you Sunday evening on the way to our site. Cherokee seemed to be mostly empty.


We followed you out the next morning and spent Wednesday night on S. Temperance, then bailed out on Baker Thursday evening due to some medical issues instead of going back to Sawbill.


Stopped in Two Harbors Thursday night as the electricity for the entire town went out.


Sounds like I just missed everyone that you ended up seeing.


Great report.

“It is clearly absurd to limit the term 'education' to a person's formal schooling.” - Murray Rothbard
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/15/2016 04:44PM
 
quote hooky: "We saw you portage out Tuesday morning. We were on #890 right there on the point across from the portage. You're the only guy we saw leave the lake that day and one group came in. Monday, we saw 2 groups leave the lake and one group come in. We probably paddled past you Sunday evening on the way to our site. Cherokee seemed to be mostly empty.



We followed you out the next morning and spent Wednesday night on S. Temperance, then bailed out on Baker Thursday evening due to some medical issues instead of going back to Sawbill.



Stopped in Two Harbors Thursday night as the electricity for the entire town went out.



Sounds like I just missed everyone that you ended up seeing.



Great report."



Thanks. Sounds like we just missed each other. I remember seeing that your site on Cherokee was occupied. It was pretty quiet after Sunday out there.
boonie
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/16/2016 02:45PM
 
Thanks for the report. I always enjoy hearing how first solos go - usually not exactly as planned - which describes my first one and some other ones, too. But I kept doing them and I have a feeling you will too. I've learned a lot from my solos and made a lot of changes to lighten the load and simplify the process. I'm sure you will too. I double portage them and I'm older and smaller than you, so don't give up on that idea.
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/16/2016 06:02PM
 
quote boonie: "Thanks for the report. I always enjoy hearing how first solos go - usually not exactly as planned - which describes my first one and some other ones, too. But I kept doing them and I have a feeling you will too. I've learned a lot from my solos and made a lot of changes to lighten the load and simplify the process. I'm sure you will too. I double portage them and I'm older and smaller than you, so don't give up on that idea. "


I won't give up. It was still an amazing trip and I am looking forward to my next one. Thanks for the comments.
FLDoug
membermember
 
09/18/2016 09:08PM
 
In a sense it reminds me of my first BWCA trip (with a friend) and my first solo in the BWCA. First trip I learned a lot about gear and weight. Also experienced what seemed like the worst storm Ive been in. Had me worried as I experienced similar things as what you described.


Next trip was first solo. On that trip I learned lots more. I took a dog with me that decided not to cooperate and had to cut the trip short due to it. That was in May. I did meet an awesome Minnesot native and we shared a campsite together for three nights. Weve kept in touch and may end up doing some more trips together.


Now I'm planning another solo for September next year. Ill probably end up with a 40lb pack. Ive got a 29lb canoe... The gear is getting pretty minimal, but not crazy minimal. I think I'm just getting smarter about the qulity and weight of the gear I carry instead of reducing the number of things I take. Although I don't take much with me. Last trip almost everyone I saw had some comment to make about how little gear it looked like I had.


To me, that means I'm doing something right. I'm working on making lots of my own gear this winter and next spring. I think that's really the best way for me to reduce my load at this point. I cant afford to buy all the super fancy light weight stuff that I still would like to have. Ive also been developing my own little systems for canoe camping and m working on optimizing gear I plan on making to fit my needs better than whats on the shelves right now.


I think if I was having to do triple portages Id move pretty slow too... I fall into the less is more crowd these days.


What pieces of gear do you think you could do without on your next trip?
Koz
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/18/2016 09:36PM
 
Great trip report. Very much enjoyed reading it. Planning my first solo.
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/19/2016 10:18AM
 
quote FLDoug: "In a sense it reminds me of my first BWCA trip (with a friend) and my first solo in the BWCA. First trip I learned a lot about gear and weight. Also experienced what seemed like the worst storm Ive been in. Had me worried as I experienced similar things as what you described.



Next trip was first solo. On that trip I learned lots more. I took a dog with me that decided not to cooperate and had to cut the trip short due to it. That was in May. I did meet an awesome Minnesot native and we shared a campsite together for three nights. Weve kept in touch and may end up doing some more trips together.



Now I'm planning another solo for September next year. Ill probably end up with a 40lb pack. Ive got a 29lb canoe... The gear is getting pretty minimal, but not crazy minimal. I think I'm just getting smarter about the qulity and weight of the gear I carry instead of reducing the number of things I take. Although I don't take much with me. Last trip almost everyone I saw had some comment to make about how little gear it looked like I had.



To me, that means I'm doing something right. I'm working on making lots of my own gear this winter and next spring. I think that's really the best way for me to reduce my load at this point. I cant afford to buy all the super fancy light weight stuff that I still would like to have. Ive also been developing my own little systems for canoe camping and m working on optimizing gear I plan on making to fit my needs better than whats on the shelves right now.



I think if I was having to do triple portages Id move pretty slow too... I fall into the less is more crowd these days.



What pieces of gear do you think you could do without on your next trip?"



I haven't really gone through all my gear and decided what I could do without. But I could have brought less clothes and less food. I was planning on being out 7 days, so I did have more food and clothes than I needed. I had some fishing gear and fished a little, but fishing is not a big priority for me, so I could eliminate that. I don't think I'm too far from being able to double portage. Just eliminating these few items and I could probably do it.
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/19/2016 10:25AM
 
quote Koz: "Great trip report. Very much enjoyed reading it. Planning my first solo. "


Thanks. Hope your first solo goes well. You can learn from all the mistakes others make. LOL
veggykurt
membermember
 
09/24/2016 08:50AM
 
Thanks for the trip report! Reminds me a lot of my first solo--I have been on only two. I took my first one at about your age and now I am 62 and just got back from my second solo on 9/17 in Quetico. On my first solo, my planning was incredibly poor: Unrealistic length of route for the time allowed. WAY too much gear and food. Too long a solo for the first one (14 days planned). Probably too challenging a route--up the falls chain in Quetico intending to go up and around to Kashahpiwi, working my way south back to Cache Bay. Not in good enough physical shape. On and on I could go. I had to triple portage then, too. As it turned out, I didn't really get very far at all. I hunkered down in camps for days at a time, discouraged and afraid some of the time, wondering, like you at times, what am I doing here, what was I thinking in my planning? I felt foolish. BUT! On the day I turned back, the wind had been blowing hard day and night for a couple of days and was driving me nuts, literally--too much constant noise. I just got my head together, got focused, loaded up and headed back to Cache bay despite the wind in Kawnipi. Seldom in my life have I had the challenge of that day. Almost swamped in big waves--forced against a rocky shore by wind and waves--having to "tack" almost against the wind using just muscle power to get to very short distances. Taking on, probably foolishly, 3 falls chain portages near the end of the day. MUCH of the day was spent in very tough paddling. But at the end of the day I had made it, despite my relative inexperience, foolishness, etc. I was so utterly exhausted. But on that day and because of that trip, I grew and gained a lot of confidence. I gained by sheer experience some skills I didn't have--especially paddling big water in the wind. On this trip just finished (trip report to come this weekend) The planning was much better especially in respect to gear. I too had to adjust my trip length to capabilities and enjoyment quotient. But I had a good trip and my performance, although not entirely devoid of foolishness, was much better.
I applaud you for daring to do it and for being frank about shortcomings. Humility can be a life-saving attribute doing these kinds of things. I have so much to learn myself, but I enjoy the unique dividends of the solo challenge.
Crazy plan posted by me somewhere else too--my son and I plan to start at 2 different points solo, then meet up somewhere and continue on together for a few days to complete the 8 or 9 day trip.
TAKE CARE!
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
09/24/2016 12:24PM
 
quote veggykurt: "Thanks for the trip report! Reminds me a lot of my first solo--I have been on only two. I took my first one at about your age and now I am 62 and just got back from my second solo on 9/17 in Quetico. On my first solo, my planning was incredibly poor: Unrealistic length of route for the time allowed. WAY too much gear and food. Too long a solo for the first one (14 days planned). Probably too challenging a route--up the falls chain in Quetico intending to go up and around to Kashahpiwi, working my way south back to Cache Bay. Not in good enough physical shape. On and on I could go. I had to triple portage then, too. As it turned out, I didn't really get very far at all. I hunkered down in camps for days at a time, discouraged and afraid some of the time, wondering, like you at times, what am I doing here, what was I thinking in my planning? I felt foolish. BUT! On the day I turned back, the wind had been blowing hard day and night for a couple of days and was driving me nuts, literally--too much constant noise. I just got my head together, got focused, loaded up and headed back to Cache bay despite the wind in Kawnipi. Seldom in my life have I had the challenge of that day. Almost swamped in big waves--forced against a rocky shore by wind and waves--having to "tack" almost against the wind using just muscle power to get to very short distances. Taking on, probably foolishly, 3 falls chain portages near the end of the day. MUCH of the day was spent in very tough paddling. But at the end of the day I had made it, despite my relative inexperience, foolishness, etc. I was so utterly exhausted. But on that day and because of that trip, I grew and gained a lot of confidence. I gained by sheer experience some skills I didn't have--especially paddling big water in the wind. On this trip just finished (trip report to come this weekend) The planning was much better especially in respect to gear. I too had to adjust my trip length to capabilities and enjoyment quotient. But I had a good trip and my performance, although not entirely devoid of foolishness, was much better.
I applaud you for daring to do it and for being frank about shortcomings. Humility can be a life-saving attribute doing these kinds of things. I have so much to learn myself, but I enjoy the unique dividends of the solo challenge.
Crazy plan posted by me somewhere else too--my son and I plan to start at 2 different points solo, then meet up somewhere and continue on together for a few days to complete the 8 or 9 day trip.
TAKE CARE!"

Thanks for the comments. I also learned a lot and grew in confidence as the trip progressed. It's what I was hoping for anyway in deciding to do this trip. To challenge myself. To have an experience like no other that I've ever had. My first night on Cherokee was the first night I've ever spent by myself outside. It's good to hear from others who have experience similar trips.
I like your trip idea with your son.
mjmkjun
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/24/2016 07:22PM
 
You did it! And you did it with 'flexibility' factor. Perfect.
Wrote a dandy trip report too.




“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” Sir Isaac Newton
Guest Paddler
 
09/25/2016 02:13PM
 
quote mjmkjun: "You did it! And you did it with 'flexibility' factor. Perfect.
Wrote a dandy trip report too.
Thanks. I learned that how important a "flexibility" factor is. Especially for the first solo.



"
paddlefamily
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/27/2016 02:37PM
 
Great report - thanks for sharing. I love that area and you covered a lot of territory.


I just completed my first solo up Sawbill, but headed north into Kelo, the Louse River area with a loop over to Mesaba. Had 7 great days in the wild and saw 6 people total.


Looking forward to another.
jaek5199
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2016 01:07PM
 
Hey, Movington - great report- thanks for the detail. I was in Burnt/Smoke a week after you on my first solo trip. Loved every minute of it! What did you use for a stove on this trip? Thanks for the info.

JohnMN
scramble4a5
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2016 08:29PM
 
A very nice report. I am a couple years older than you and do double portage. For me, keeping the smaller of my two packs under 20 pounds is the key. Usually it is 15 at most. My larger pack is in the 43 pound range. So maybe just shift more weight to your heavier pack? I am not a small guy but have never been a bodybuilder either. I will press 50-60 pounds over my head for three sets two to three times a week for several months prior to my trip. For me, making sure I am in shape makes the trip possible.


By the way, a fellow Chicago area resident here.
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
01/02/2017 04:30PM
 
quote jaek5199: "Hey, Movington - great report- thanks for the detail. I was in Burnt/Smoke a week after you on my first solo trip. Loved every minute of it! What did you use for a stove on this trip? Thanks for the info."


Hi, Thanks,
I used a Etekcity Ultralight Portable Outdoor Backpacking Camping Stove with Piezo Ignition. It is small and light and worked great for me. I plan on using it again on my next trip.
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
01/02/2017 04:36PM
 
quote scramble4a5: "A very nice report. I am a couple years older than you and do double portage. For me, keeping the smaller of my two packs under 20 pounds is the key. Usually it is 15 at most. My larger pack is in the 43 pound range. So maybe just shift more weight to your heavier pack? I am not a small guy but have never been a bodybuilder either. I will press 50-60 pounds over my head for three sets two to three times a week for several months prior to my trip. For me, making sure I am in shape makes the trip possible.



By the way, a fellow Chicago area resident here.
"



I've had plenty of time to analyze my trip and think about what I will do different on the next trip. First of all I took too much stuff, so I am already thinking about what I can do without and different ways to lighten my load. I also bought a CCS Pioneer pack, which I really like. I started a workout program, which I have been on for 3 months now. I walk 2 miles on the treadmill 3 days a week with my pioneer pack filled with gear and weights. I started at 30 lbs and am up to 50 lbs now. Also three days a week I workout on my bowflex. I'm getting in better shape and stronger every day. I am planning my 2nd solo for the third or fourth week of May, just prior to Memorial Day. I am planning on taking the trip I intended to take last fall, but, as I wrote in my trip report, couldn't complete and had to cut short and re-route. I know that I will be able to double portage, at least, hopefully, single portage. I plan on starting a Sawbill and heading up through Cherokee, Tuscarora, and Little Saganaga then back down through Hub, Meseba, through Zenith and Kelso back to Sawbill. I started thinking about going to a different area, but I really want to complete the trip I started last fall first. Nice to meet a fellow Chicago area resident.
boonie
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/03/2017 10:19AM
 
It's good to hear of your plans for a second solo and the changes you are making to lighten the load and get in better shape; both will pay big dividends.


That will be a nice route. I have been on all parts of it, except the part from Sawbill to Long Island. You will see some nice country and beautiful lakes, some lesser-visited, and will do some long portages, some tough portages, and some awkward ones.


You can find out some information on the last half of your route from a 2014 trip inspector13 and I did from Kawishiwi Lake to Little Saganaga. We both posted trip reports. I also posted a bunch of pictures from the trip here .


In 2015 I went in at Cross Bay, down to Snipe, across to Tuscarora, west to Mora, and out through Missing Link. There are pictures at the above link, but no trip report. I do have some notes and can email you some relevant information if you like - just let me know. How do you plan to go from Long Island to Tuscarora - Snipe to Copper and across the Howl Swamp portage or Snipe to Missing Link?


Have you plotted out the mileage of your route? I'm guesstimating it's about 60 +/- miles, assuming double portaging. How many days/nights and where do you plan to camp? I've camped on several different lakes on your route.


You will enjoy this adventure and route. Snipe is a really cool lake. The trip across Copper, Hubbub, Howl was interesting, and I can give you some useful information. Tusc is a nice lake and I spent some nights there at 2 different sites. Little Saganaga is a beautiful lake - Steve and I laid over there for a day. There was no one else there. The portage from Fente to Hub will test you - it's almost a mile and begins with a long steep climb if you haven't the elevation gain on the topo maps. Crank the grade on that treadmill as high as it will go! The Zenith-Lujenida portage was "fun", but I think it may have been "improved" some since we did it. The Kelso River is a nice paddle - be sure to stop at the dolmen.


Let me know if you want me to email any additional info I can dig up.


movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
01/03/2017 04:31PM
 
Hey boonie, thanks for the info. Your 2014 trip from Kawishimi to Saganaga and back down through Kelso is the trip I was thinking about taking this spring. But, like I said, I have to complete the trip I started last fall. I missed so much of what I wanted to see and experience when I had to shorten it. I'll probably plan on taking the Kawishimi trip in the fall. I have searched for information on the Snipe to Copper and across Howl Swamp portage route and have read a few trip reports about that route. I was leaning towards the Snipe to Missing Link route because it seems like more of a sure thing. I was worried about the condition of the Howl Swamp route and worried about finding the portages. Let me know what information you have on that and I may change my mind.
boonie
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/03/2017 06:32PM
 
I'll dig up my notes and email you whatever info I find on that movington.


In the meantime, if you click the link to my photos on shutterfly and go to the 2015 album, you can see some very good pictures of it. Click slideshow and when the pictures enlarge, they are labeled (lower left corner) and a few pictures in you'll be going to Snipe and be on your route all the way out to Mora Lake. Same things are true of the 2014 album at the bottom - when you get to Little Saganaga, the rest will be right on your way out.


I went out from Tuscarora to Missing Link then to Round Lake, and walked from there back to my car at Cross Bay.


I didn't do the Snipe to Missing Link but, but DeterminedOrange told me it had a very awkward and somewhat hard spot in it, and it's not short. Based on that, what I know about the Missing Link to Tuscarora portage, and having gone through Copper/Howl, I'd take the latter. It's probably faster and shorter. I really enjoyed that section myself.


However, there was and probably still is, a flooded section on the Snipe to Copper portage that required a short paddle with the consequent reloading/unloading. The same is true of the Hubbub-Tuscarora portage. Howl Lake isn't there anymore, but there's a beaver dam and pond that floods the portage.


Those portages are not hard to find, nor are they otherwise hard. They see more use than some of the other portages you'll be on later in your trip.
boonie
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/03/2017 07:45PM
 
Email sent, Mark.
scramble4a5
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2017 09:33PM
 
quote movington: "quote scramble4a5: "A very nice report. I am a couple years older than you and do double portage. For me, keeping the smaller of my two packs under 20 pounds is the key. Usually it is 15 at most. My larger pack is in the 43 pound range. So maybe just shift more weight to your heavier pack? I am not a small guy but have never been a bodybuilder either. I will press 50-60 pounds over my head for three sets two to three times a week for several months prior to my trip. For me, making sure I am in shape makes the trip possible.




By the way, a fellow Chicago area resident here.
"




I've had plenty of time to analyze my trip and think about what I will do different on the next trip. First of all I took too much stuff, so I am already thinking about what I can do without and different ways to lighten my load. I also bought a CCS Pioneer pack, which I really like. I started a workout program, which I have been on for 3 months now. I walk 2 miles on the treadmill 3 days a week with my pioneer pack filled with gear and weights. I started at 30 lbs and am up to 50 lbs now. Also three days a week I workout on my bowflex. I'm getting in better shape and stronger every day. I am planning my 2nd solo for the third or fourth week of May, just prior to Memorial Day. I am planning on taking the trip I intended to take last fall, but, as I wrote in my trip report, couldn't complete and had to cut short and re-route. I know that I will be able to double portage, at least, hopefully, single portage. I plan on starting a Sawbill and heading up through Cherokee, Tuscarora, and Little Saganaga then back down through Hub, Meseba, through Zenith and Kelso back to Sawbill. I started thinking about going to a different area, but I really want to complete the trip I started last fall first. Nice to meet a fellow Chicago area resident. "



That's a serious workout plan! I don't think you'll have any problems on your next trip.
Eric7753
membermember
 
01/06/2017 07:18PM
 
I loved the report, the detail and honesty is great. I never count problems as downfalls, only learning opportunities for the next time.


I would love to do a solo trip sometime and the route you took is on my list of wants. Someday...

A vacation day not on the water, might as well be a work day...
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
01/08/2017 12:57PM
 
quote Eric7753: "I loved the report, the detail and honesty is great. I never count problems as downfalls, only learning opportunities for the next time.



I would love to do a solo trip sometime and the route you took is on my list of wants. Someday..."



All I can say is...just do it..make it a goal and do it.


I was not as prepared as I should have been. I just kinda jumped in with both feet. It was only the 2nd time I have ever been to the BWCA and the 1st time I had ever spent a night alone in any kind of wilderness setting. I was not as prepared as I should have been, I took too much stuff, I didn't do any kind of trial run to see how much I could carry at one time and I planned too long of a route.
But I'm glad I did it and I learned so much from it. I have no regrets about that trip. I just, like you said, used it as a learning opportunity for the next time.
paddlinjoe
distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/10/2017 01:30PM
 
I really enjoyed reading about the learning you did and your enthusiasm. Given your workout routine and determination you may end up doing your loop twice in your allotted time. I look forward to reading about it.

paddlinjoe
movington
senior membersenior membersenior member
 
01/10/2017 03:15PM
 
quote paddlinjoe: "I really enjoyed reading about the learning you did and your enthusiasm. Given your workout routine and determination you may end up doing your loop twice in your allotted time. I look forward to reading about it."


Thanks. I expect to cover a lot of territory on my next trip. But I'll be happy just to be out there experiencing whatever happens.
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